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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Dirk De Clercq, Inam Ul Haq and Muhammad Umer Azeem

This paper aims to investigate how employees’ perceptions of psychological contract violation or sense of organizational betrayal, might diminish their job satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how employees’ perceptions of psychological contract violation or sense of organizational betrayal, might diminish their job satisfaction, as well as how their access to two critical personal resources – emotion regulation skills and work-related self-efficacy – might buffer this negative relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Two-wave survey data came from employees of Pakistani-based organizations.

Findings

Perceived contract violation reduces job satisfaction, but the effect is weaker at higher levels of emotion regulation skills and work-related self-efficacy.

Practical implications

For organizations, these results show that the frustrations that come with a sense of organizational betrayal can be contained more easily to the extent that their employees can draw from relevant personal resources.

Originality/value

This investigation provides a more complete understanding of when perceived contract violation will deplete employees’ emotional resources, in the form of feelings of happiness about their job situation. A sense of organizational betrayal is less likely to escalate into reduced job satisfaction when employees can control their negative emotions and feel confident about their work-related competencies.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2018

Dirk De Clercq, Inam Ul Haq and Muhammad Umer Azeem

With a foundation in conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to unpack the relationship between employees’ self-efficacy and job performance…

3573

Abstract

Purpose

With a foundation in conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to unpack the relationship between employees’ self-efficacy and job performance, investigating the mediating role of job-related anxiety and the moderating role of perceived workplace incivility.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from employees and their supervisors in Pakistani organizations.

Findings

An important reason that employees’ self-efficacy enhances their job performance is that they experience less anxiety while undertaking their daily job tasks. This mediating role of job-related anxiety is particularly salient to the extent that employees believe that they are the victims of uncivil behaviors.

Practical implications

Organizations should note that the anxiety-mitigating effect of self-efficacy is particularly strong for generating adequate performance to the extent that rude and discourteous behaviors cannot be completely avoided in the workplace.

Originality/value

This study establishes a more complete understanding of the benefits of employees’ self-efficacy by revealing how reduced worries about their organizational functioning represent critical mechanisms that connect this personal resource to higher job performance, as well as by showing how employees’ perceptions of workplace incivility invigorate this process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2022

Muhammad Umer Azeem, Dirk De Clercq and Inam Ul Haq

This study aims to unpack the link between co-worker incivility and job performance, by detailing a mediating role of psychological detachment and a moderating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to unpack the link between co-worker incivility and job performance, by detailing a mediating role of psychological detachment and a moderating role of psychological capital.

Design/methodology/approach

The research hypotheses are tested with three-wave, time-lagged data collected from Pakistani-based employees and their supervisors.

Findings

An important reason that disrespectful co-worker treatment curtails job performance, with respect to both in-role and extra-role work efforts, is that employees detach from their work environment. This mediating role of psychological detachment is less salient to the extent that employees possess high levels of psychological capital.

Practical implications

For organizations, this study pinpoints a key mechanism, a propensity to distance oneself from work, by which convictions that co-workers do not show respect direct employees away from productive work activities. This study also shows how this mechanism can be subdued by ensuring that employees exhibit energy-enhancing personal resources.

Originality/value

This study expands extant research on the dark side of interpersonal co-worker relationships by revealing pertinent factors that explain why and when co-worker incivility can escalate into diminished performance-enhancing activities.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 October 2022

Ghulam Murtaza, Olivier Roques, Qurat-ul-ain Talpur, Rahman Khan and Inam Ul Haq

The purpose of this study is to examine the moderating effects of mindfulness on the relationships between work stressors (perceived organisational politics [POP] and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the moderating effects of mindfulness on the relationships between work stressors (perceived organisational politics [POP] and effort–reward imbalance [ERI]) and work outcomes (job burnout [JBO] and job satisfaction [JS]).

Design/methodology/approach

Time-lagged data were collected from public sector employees in France and Pakistan. The final samples (France, N = 204; Pakistan, N = 217) were tested using multiple moderating regression.

Findings

Mindfulness moderates the relationship between work stressors and work outcomes. Mindfulness serves as a personal resource for employees: it mitigates the negative influence that POP and ERI have on JBO and JS.

Originality/value

This study extends current knowledge on the relationships between work stressors and work outcomes across cultures by testing mindfulness as a valuable personal resource.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 January 2023

Dirk De Clercq, Muhammad Umer Azeem and Inam Ul Haq

This study investigates how leaders react when they perceive a threat to their hierarchical position, such as by engaging in abusive supervision in ways that diminish…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates how leaders react when they perceive a threat to their hierarchical position, such as by engaging in abusive supervision in ways that diminish followers’ organizational citizenship behavior. It also tests for a dual harmful role of leaders’ dispositional contempt in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Three-wave survey data were collected among 231 leader–follower dyads across different industry sectors.

Findings

Leaders’ beliefs that their authority is being threatened by high-performing followers can lead followers to halt their voluntary work behaviors, because leaders engage in verbal abuse. The harmful role of leaders’ dispositional contempt in this process is twofold: It enhances abusive supervision directly, and it operates as an indirect catalyst of the mediating role of abusive supervision.

Practical implications

Organizations would be better placed to decrease the risk that disruptions of the hierarchical order, as perceived by leaders, escalate into diminished work-related voluntarism among employee bases by promoting leadership approaches that consider employees deserving of respect instead of disdain.

Originality/value

This study details how and when leaders who fear they may lose authority, evoked by the strong performance of their followers, actually discourage followers from doing anything more than their formal job duties.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 December 2022

Muhammad Umer Azeem, Dirk De Clercq and Inam Ul Haq

This study investigates how and when employees' exposure to organizational leaders who propose major changes might direct those employees toward efforts to mobilize…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates how and when employees' exposure to organizational leaders who propose major changes might direct those employees toward efforts to mobilize support for innovative ideas. It specifically theorizes a mediating role of performance pressure beliefs and a moderating role of perceived organizational underperformance in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Three-wave, multi-rater survey data were collected among employees and their supervisors across various industries.

Findings

A critical explanatory mechanism that links change-oriented leadership with enhanced championing efforts is that employees experience performance-related hardships. The extent to which employees perceive that their organization is unable to meet its own performance targets triggers this process.

Practical implications

For organizational decision makers, the findings identify results-driven pressures as key mechanisms by which employees' exposures to change-oriented leadership can be leveraged to promote novel ideas. This translation is more likely among employees who are convinced that there is significant room for organizational improvement.

Originality/value

This study unravels the previously unexplored link between change-oriented leadership and idea championing, pinpointing the influences of two performance-related aspects: beliefs about strenuous organization-induced performance expectations and perceptions of an underperforming employer.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Dirk De Clercq, Muhammad Umer Azeem and Inam Ul Haq

This study seeks to unpack the negative relationship between employees' political ineptness and their job performance, by proposing a mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to unpack the negative relationship between employees' political ineptness and their job performance, by proposing a mediating role of organization-induced emotional exhaustion and a moderating role of perceived organizational unforgiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The research hypotheses were tested with three-round survey data collected among employees and their supervisors across multiple industry sectors.

Findings

Political ineptness diminishes the likelihood that employees undertake performance-enhancing work behaviors because they perceive that their employer is draining their emotional resources. This mediating role of organization-induced emotional exhaustion is particularly salient when they perceive that organizational authorities do not forgive mistakes.

Practical implications

This study reveals a critical risk for employees who find it difficult to exert influence on others: They become complacent in their job duties, which then might further compromise their ability to leave a positive impression on others. This counterproductive process is especially prominent if organizational leaders appear unforgiving.

Originality/value

This study contributes to extant research by explicating an unexplored mechanism (organization-induced emotional exhaustion) and catalyst (organizational unforgiveness) related to the escalation of political ineptness into diminished job performance.

Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Dirk De Clercq, Inam Ul Haq and Muhammad Umer Azeem

This study investigates the mediating role of improvisation behavior in the relationship between employees' perceptions of procedural justice and their job performance, as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the mediating role of improvisation behavior in the relationship between employees' perceptions of procedural justice and their job performance, as evaluated by their supervisors, as well as the invigorating role of their organization-based self-esteem in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected in three rounds among employees and their supervisors in Pakistan.

Findings

An important factor that connects procedural justice with enhanced job performance is whether employees react quickly to unexpected problems while carrying out their jobs. This mediating role of improvisation is particularly salient to the extent that employees consider themselves valuable organizational members.

Practical implications

For organizations, this study pinpoints a key mechanism—willingness to respond in the moment to unanticipated organizational failures—by which fair decision-making processes can steer employees toward performance-enhancing activities. It also reveals how this mechanism can be activated, namely, by ensuring that employees feel appreciated.

Originality/value

Improvisation represents an understudied but critical behavioral factor that links employees' beliefs about fair decision-making procedures to enhanced performance outcomes. This study shows, for the first time, how this beneficial role can be reinforced by organization-based self-esteem, as a critical personal resource.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Shazia Nauman, Usman Raja, Inam Ul Haq and Waqas Bilal

The extant research on emotional labor (EL) has focused on positive and negative outcomes observed in the workplace; however, many fundamental questions remain unanswered…

1883

Abstract

Purpose

The extant research on emotional labor (EL) has focused on positive and negative outcomes observed in the workplace; however, many fundamental questions remain unanswered. The research has yet to consider what factors buffer the negative outcomes of EL. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between workload job demand and employee well-being with mediating effects of surface acting (SA) and moderating effects of emotional intelligence (EI) in service organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used two wave data from a sample of 207 emergency medical technicians to test the hypotheses.

Findings

By integrating SA, EI and employee well-being with the conservation of resource theory, the authors found evidence of an indirect effect of workload job demand on emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction via SA. The results of moderated mediation show that the negative relationship between SA and job satisfaction was low when EI was high and the positive relationship between SA and emotional exhaustion was low when EI was high.

Research limitations/implications

A major limitation of the present study is that all the participants were male and drawn from a single profession within the same organization. Another limitation is that the data were collected through self-reports.

Practical implications

This research has important theoretical and practical implications for service organizations wishing to buffer the harmful effects of SA on employees. This study presents key theoretical implications for the EL and well-being literatures. An important practical implication is that EI is a good resource for managing SA’s negative outcomes.

Originality/value

The current study contributes to the extant research by showing that workload job demands have negative effects on employee well-being via SA resulting in reduced job satisfaction and increased emotional exhaustion. Further, the negative outcomes of SA on employee well-being can be buffered through EI by taking EI as an emotional resource. High level of EI helps employees to mitigate the harmful effects of SA.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Dirk De Clercq, Inam Ul Haq and Muhammad Umer Azeem

With a basis in the conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between employees’ experience of time-related work…

2206

Abstract

Purpose

With a basis in the conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between employees’ experience of time-related work stress and their engagement in counterproductive work behavior (CWB), as well as the invigorating roles that different deviant personality traits might play in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Two-wave survey data with a time lag of three weeks were collected from 127 employees in Pakistani organizations.

Findings

Employees’ sense that they have insufficient time to do their job tasks spurs their CWB, and this effect is particularly strong if they have strong Machiavellian, narcissistic or psychopathic tendencies.

Originality/value

This study adds to extant research by identifying employees’ time-related work stress as an understudied driver of their CWB and the three personality traits that constitute the dark triad as triggers of the translation of time-related work stress into CWB.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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