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Article

Ipek Kocoglu, Gary Lynn, Yunho Jung, Peter G. Dominick, Zvi Aronson and Pamela Burke

The purpose of this paper is to expand our understanding on team listening by incorporating an action component. The authors empirically test the effect of this expanded…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand our understanding on team listening by incorporating an action component. The authors empirically test the effect of this expanded concept, namely team action listening on team success, and investigate how team commitment moderates the relationship between team trust and team action listening.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explored listening in teams in the field and in the lab, both qualitatively and quantitatively, through studying 474 team members representing 100 teams. The authors tested the hypotheses by structural equation modeling augmented with in-depth team interviews.

Findings

The findings showed that: teams demonstrate that they listen by taking action, teams that exhibit action listening are more successful, there is a direct relationship between team trust and team action listening and team commitment negatively moderates this relation in larger teams.

Practical implications

Managers should encourage taking action in team discussions. Yet, they should be wary of the detrimental effects of team commitment to team action listening particularly in teams with high trust. Commitment increases the risk of groupthink and decreases the participation to team discussions and listening. In particular, managers may benefit from keeping the team smaller, as in large teams, commitment suppresses the relationship between trust and team action listening.

Originality/value

This study extends research on team listening by adding the action aspect that distinguishes successful teams. It is one of the first to investigate the interrelationships between team trust, commitment, team action listening and success in teams.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Vicente Martínez-Tur, Agustín Molina, Carolina Moliner, Esther Gracia, Luisa Andreu, Enrique Bigne and Oto Luque

The purpose of this paper is to propose that the manager’s perception of the service quality delivered by his/her team acts as a precursor of his/her trust in team

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose that the manager’s perception of the service quality delivered by his/her team acts as a precursor of his/her trust in team members. In turn, the manager’s trust in team members is related to team members’ trust in the manager. Furthermore, engagement and burnout at the individual level are considered outcomes of trust reciprocity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test this trust-mediated multilevel model with a sample of 95 managers and 754 team members working in services for people with intellectual disability. These services are delivered by team-based structures of workers who perform coordinated tasks.

Findings

The findings suggest that service quality delivered by team members is positively and significantly related to the manager’s trust in them. The results also suggest that the manager’s trust in team members leads to the trust that managers received by team members. Finally, team members who trust their managers show less burnout and high engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Previous literature has neglected the reciprocity of trust. In contrast, this research study considered the perspective of both managers and team members and how this reciprocity of trust is related to service quality and well-being at work.

Practical implications

The current study highlights the critical role of service quality and achieving high-quality relationships between managers and team members.

Originality/value

Performance and well-being are compatible because team members’ efforts are compensated by forming relationships with managers based on trust, and the quality of these relationships, in turn, prevents burnout and stimulates engagement among employees.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part

Trevor N. Fry, Kyi Phyu Nyein and Jessica L. Wildman

Theories of trust imply that team trust develops and grows over time, yet relatively few researchers have taken on the challenge of studying team trust in longitudinal…

Abstract

Purpose

Theories of trust imply that team trust develops and grows over time, yet relatively few researchers have taken on the challenge of studying team trust in longitudinal research designs. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a concise summary of the existing literature on team trust over time, and to offer a conceptual model of team-level trust development over time to aid future research on this topic.

Methodology/approach

We draw from the Input–Mediator–Output–Input (IMOI) framework, as well as previous multilevel models of organizational trust development, and published findings from longitudinal team trust studies.

Findings

Taking a temporal perspective, we consider how team-level mediators and outcomes can both predict and be predicted by team trust trajectories and feedback loops over time, as well as how those relationships with team trust might change based on the existence of other moderating variables including trust violation and repair.

Research implications

Future longitudinal team research may use the model as a starting point for investigating the antecedents, as well as the team processes and dynamic emergent states, that can effectively predict trajectories of team trust across various stages of teamwork.

Practical implications

Based on our review of extant literature, we provide several recommendations for training and organizational intervention including the importance of management’s consideration of team-level trust in providing feedback, enhancing cohesion, and mitigating conflict.

Originality/value

We provide insight into the development of team trust trajectories and offer a framework to help guide future longitudinal team trust research.

Details

Team Dynamics Over Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-403-7

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Book part

Stephen M. Fiore, Dorothy R. Carter and Raquel Asencio

In this chapter we discuss attitudinal and affective factors in the context of science teams. We review some of the key findings on conflict, trust, and cohesion in teams

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss attitudinal and affective factors in the context of science teams. We review some of the key findings on conflict, trust, and cohesion in teams and discuss the differentiation between team-related and task-related definitions of each. In so doing, we discuss their relevance to team effectiveness in science teams and provide guidance on notional areas of research for understanding how these are related to effectiveness in science teams.

Details

Team Cohesion: Advances in Psychological Theory, Methods and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-283-2

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Article

Torbjørn Bjorvatn and Andreas Wald

With faster innovation and shorter product cycles, time pressure is a highly relevant factor affecting contemporary business processes. This study aims to extend prior…

Abstract

Purpose

With faster innovation and shorter product cycles, time pressure is a highly relevant factor affecting contemporary business processes. This study aims to extend prior research on the effects of velocity at the firm level by considering the effect of time pressure on knowledge transfer effectiveness (KTE) on the team level and the role of trust as a mediator of this effect.

Design/methodology/approach

We empirically assess the impact of time pressure on knowledge transfer effectiveness in teams. Further, we test the mediating effect of trust on this relationship. We study a sample of 285 project teams applying partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The authors find that time pressure is negatively associated with KTE. Moreover, trust among team members has a complementary mediating effect on this relationship. Thus, while trust is urgently needed for enhancing KTE under time pressure, time pressure reduces trust-building too.

Research limitations/implications

This study establishes empirically the importance of time pressure and trust as drivers of KTE in teams. The contribution connects the field of knowledge management to important streams in the wider business literature: organization studies, management, strategic management, project management, innovation etc. Whereas the model is parsimonious, it has high explanatory power and high generalizability to other contexts.

Practical implications

Team managers should take care to allow enough time for knowledge transfer within the team. This is particularly important when knowledge sharing is central, e.g. in innovation, development and change processes. If this is not possible, measures should be taken to maintain trust among team members.

Social implications

Effective knowledge management enhances the performance of business entities and public-sector organizations alike. Today, both the private and public sectors are under considerable pressure to increase both efficiency and effectiveness. Effective knowledge transfer within teams is a core capability to achieve this goal. More effective organizations result in more competitive private firms, more employment opportunities and improved public services to citizens.

Originality/value

Time pressure is an increasingly relevant factor in contemporary business but so far little explored in research. This study extends current knowledge by considering the effect of time pressure on KTE.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article

Tiina Kähkönen

This study examines trust-repair practices at the team level after organizational change.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines trust-repair practices at the team level after organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach was adopted, and data were collected from key informants through focus group discussions and interviews. The data analysis involved thematic coding and followed the structured procedure.

Findings

This study found that after organization change, trust can be repaired at the team level by improving team leaders' information sharing and knowledge in change management, and by enforcing communication, collaboration and ethical behaviour among team members.

Research limitations/implications

This paper makes three key contributions by (1) identifying trust violations in teams, (2) proposing trust-repair mechanisms and (3) extending the understanding of trust-repair and preservation at the team level following organizational change.

Practical implications

This paper provides practical information from a real-work context and can improve managers' understanding of active trust-repair.

Originality/value

This paper outlines active trust-repair mechanisms in an organizational change context and expands the current theory by presenting novel insights into organizational trust-repair at the team level. This study contributes to trust literature by proposing promising avenues for future trust-repair research.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article

Kara A. Arnold, Julian Barling and E. Kevin Kelloway

This paper investigates the differential effects of transformational leadership and the “iron cage” on trust, commitment and team efficacy at the team level…

Abstract

This paper investigates the differential effects of transformational leadership and the “iron cage” on trust, commitment and team efficacy at the team level. Transformational leadership has been shown to have positive effects on trust, commitment and team efficacy. However, it could be argued that these results are not due to the leadership but to the idea that the team has developed strong norms that constrain their behavior and “force” them to perform. The rival hypothesis that the iron cage results in trust, commitment and team efficacy is tested using hierarchical regression analysis. We find that transformational leadership in teams predicts trust, commitment and team efficacy over and beyond the perceptions of the iron cage. The iron cage adds to the prediction of commitment only. Results suggest that while encouraging strong values and norms within a team will lead to increased commitment, focusing on transformational leadership in teams is a more effective way to encourage the development of trust, commitment and team efficacy.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part

Leslie H. Vincent

This chapter examines the role of team processes in predicting overall effectiveness for multidisciplinary teams charged with commercializing new technologies. Theory…

Abstract

This chapter examines the role of team processes in predicting overall effectiveness for multidisciplinary teams charged with commercializing new technologies. Theory suggests that both social- and task-related processes are essential in order for diverse teams to achieve their full potential. Furthermore, these team processes evolve over time, creating even more complexity related to technology commercialization. A panel of teams is surveyed over time to capture this dynamism and the role of key social and task processes. Results suggest that social team processes, such as cohesion and identification, predict affective performance (i.e., team satisfaction and commitment). Objective team performance is primarily a function of task cohesion and trust. Furthermore, affective performance serves as a mediator between social team processes and objective performance for these high-tech teams. Post-hoc analyses examine the differences in the development of both task and social processes for high- and low-performing teams. High-performing teams have higher levels of task-focused interaction, functional conflict and task cohesion early on in the commercialization process as compared with low-performing teams. Effective teams establish key social processes early on, which provides the foundation for team success.

Details

Spanning Boundaries and Disciplines: University Technology Commercialization in the Idea Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-200-6

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Article

Jan Merok Paulsen and Kjell Brynjulf Hjertø

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how school principals’ leadership competence is enhanced by participation in municipal school district leader teams in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how school principals’ leadership competence is enhanced by participation in municipal school district leader teams in the Norwegian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigated a field sample of 854 school principals working in 252 municipal school leader teams. Hypotheses were developed and tested by using multiple regressions and structural equation modeling; whereas individual- and group-level effects were tested using a hierarchical linear modeling approach. Moderator analyses where undertaken.

Findings

The results indicate that a supportive group climate in school leader teams is the strongest predictor of the principals’ learning outcomes. Moreover, trust to the superintendent and having a competent municipal school owner apparatus also predicted this form of professional development. Moderator analysis provides supplementary insights by showing that the positive effect of a trusting relationship to superintendents is contingent of a competent school owner.

Research limitations/implications

The study reinforces the crucial importance of school superintendents creating a supportive and risk-free learning climate within their team of school leaders. The study underscores the importance of a competent school owner in Norwegian municipalities and the study places emphasis on a trusting relationship between school principals and their immediate superintendent.

Practical implications

The study highlights the importance that school district administrators develop municipal school leader teams toward effective learning system through internal competence development and a supportive group climate.

Originality/value

The study provides empirical evidence regarding the complex dynamics involved in the professional development of school principals in district leadership teams.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article

Preeti S. Rawat, Shrabani B. Bhattacharjee and Vaishali Ganesh

The purpose of this paper is to study if trust on team members and leaders leads to an experience of civil behavior in the workplace or reduced incivility at the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study if trust on team members and leaders leads to an experience of civil behavior in the workplace or reduced incivility at the workplace. The study was conducted on women employees and therefore termed as selective incivility.

Design/methodology/approach

In the study, the relationship between team trust and leader trust was the antecedent variables and general well-being was the consequent variable. Civil behavior in the workplace was the mediating variable. The research was conducted on 228 working women in different sectors of the Indian organization. Trust (in leaders and on teams) and general well-being were measured by established scales. Selective incivility scale was developed based on the qualitative inputs from working women. Data were analysed on SPSS and AMOS version 20.

Findings

The study showed that trust (between leader and subordinates and among team members) led to an experience of civil behavior at workplace, and experience of civil behavior led to an experience of general well-being.

Research limitations/implications

This research has contributed to both theoretical and managerial aspects. On the theoretical front, this research has emphasized the role of trust in building a civil environment in the workplace. On the managerial front, it has contributed to showing how low incivility encourages inclusivity and maintains the general well-being of employees, and therefore advocates the practice of civil behavior.

Practical implications

The study is relevant in managing politics at workplace. With an environment of trust, the insecurity and doubt in the minds of employees are reduced. This leads to higher well-being of employees. In the modern times, workplaces are becoming more diverse. There are not only gender differences but also differences in age, sexual orientation and persons with disabilities. Presence of low incivility can go a long way in encouraging an inclusive workplace. It is thus relevant in managing workplace diversity and for creating a more inclusive environment.

Social implications

Diverse workplace constituting women and minority race have experienced more workplace incivility (Cameron and Webster, 2011). Also, presence of higher percentage of men in the workforce composition enhanced incivility toward women (Trudel and Reio, 2011). As the paper indicates that low incivility leads to general well-being, it also tries to point out that overall health of organization also improves. It should not be ignored that it is not only the employee who is exposed to incivility who gets affected but also the other employees who are witness to such situation.

Originality/value

This study investigates the mediating effect of civil behavior at the workplace between trust, both team member and leader, and general well-being.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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