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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2021

Sabina Riboldazzi and Antonella Capriello

The predominant role played by large-scale retailers in consumer goods markets has led to substantial changes in the promotion and advertising flows of companies operating…

Abstract

The predominant role played by large-scale retailers in consumer goods markets has led to substantial changes in the promotion and advertising flows of companies operating in this sector. Manufacturing companies are in fact investing an increasingly larger share of their resources in communication strategies managed by retailers by way of in-store communications, taking advantage of both traditional and digital media. As a result, besides being a place of purchase, the point of sale has become an environment where customer relationships are being built and developed over time. In this book chapter, we take a closer look at current in-store communications via cutting-edge digital media solutions designed to boost customer experience and brand loyalty. To gain a better understanding of these new forms of communication, we have also conducted a qualitative case study on “The Supermarket of the Future,” a new retail format recently launched by Coop Italia in Milan, using data from different sources, including internal and external document reviews and in-store observations. Overall, this study outlines an innovative customer relationship format consistent with an omni-channel approach and informative in-store communications integrating traditional and new digital media.

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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2021

Bethan Alexander and Anthony Kent

Continuous change has long been recognized as a core characteristic of retailing, its recent acceleration unprecedented, yet innovation in retailing remains…

Abstract

Purpose

Continuous change has long been recognized as a core characteristic of retailing, its recent acceleration unprecedented, yet innovation in retailing remains under-researched, especially within fashion retailing. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to generate a deeper understanding of if, and to what extent, fashion retailers across different market segments are innovating in terms of in-store technology diffusion over time by taking a long-term perspective over five years.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on retail change and innovation diffusion theory, the study takes a qualitative approach, using direct observation of 71 fashion stores in London (UK) in 2014 and 2019. In total, 142 stores were tabulated in Excel and qualitatively analysed manually and with NVivo.

Findings

The findings identify the innovation adoption strategies implemented, the types of in-store technologies adopted over time and the fashion retail innovation adopters.

Originality/value

The research offers new knowledge in terms of retail innovation and retail change, specifically on retail diffusion of innovation and the importance of in-store technology integration. Several practical implications for improving technology innovation management are also identified.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Angelo Bonfanti and Georgia Yfantidou

This study aims to detect the dimensions of the in-store customer shopping experience from the sports retailer perspective and to investigate how the role of sports…

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1738

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to detect the dimensions of the in-store customer shopping experience from the sports retailer perspective and to investigate how the role of sports equipment stores is changing.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study performs semi-structured interviews with retail managers of sports equipment stores.

Findings

This research reveals the importance of the dimensions of immersive design, sensorial ambient elements, social relationships, trialability and real experience sharing in designing a memorable in-store shopping experience in sports stores, and it highlights that the store's role in the sports context is transitioning from sales space to an interactive, immersive, engaging and convivial place. It proposes a model to design the in-store customer shopping experience effectively.

Practical implications

Sports equipment managers can make their physical stores as experiential as possible by investing in expert, passionate personnel and technology in order to create a real in-store experience of the product and the sports practice.

Originality/value

While sports equipment retailers acknowledge the importance of providing customers with a memorable shopping experience by creating an evocative environment and placing multiple touchpoints in stores, management scholars have paid limited attention to sports stores. This study explores the ways in which sports retail managers can design their stores effectively in experiential terms.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Isabelle Collin-Lachaud and Mbaye Fall Diallo

This research seeks to investigate how in-store mobile use affects store loyalty directly or indirectly via the mediation of store value and whether social influence…

Abstract

Purpose

This research seeks to investigate how in-store mobile use affects store loyalty directly or indirectly via the mediation of store value and whether social influence moderates such relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 862 actual customers from a market research company panel, we used structural equation modelling to test a series of research hypotheses.

Findings

The results show a positive but weak effect of in-store smartphone use on loyalty. This effect is significantly mediated by the store’s hedonic and symbolic value dimensions, but not by its utilitarian value. This research also uncovers significant moderation effects of social influence on the relationships investigated. The effect of in-store smartphone use on store loyalty is stronger when social influence is lower. However, the effects of hedonic and symbolic store value are stronger when social influence is higher.

Research limitations/implications

This research is carried out in one country (France). It focuses on social influence through in-store mobile phone use; it would also be useful to consider physical social influence.

Practical implications

Retailers should position their stores on specific value dimensions and use social influence appropriately to improve loyalty. For instance, utilitarian value should be offered to customers with low social influence. To prevent negative social influence, retailers could develop “controlled” social influence through their own private mobile app to favour interaction.

Originality/value

This research underlines the critical role of store value and social influence on the relationships between smartphone use and store loyalty. It shows that the effects of value dimensions (utilitarian, hedonic and symbolic) on loyalty differ depending on social influence level.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 March 2020

Michelle Childs, Tiffany Blanchflower, Songyee Hur and Delisia Matthews

Revolutionary changes are happening in retail, and the term “retail apocalypse” reflects these dramatic changes. As a growing number of traditional brick-and-motor…

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2668

Abstract

Purpose

Revolutionary changes are happening in retail, and the term “retail apocalypse” reflects these dramatic changes. As a growing number of traditional brick-and-motor retailers are closing, the aim of this study is to understand and test the dimensions of specific store and consumer factors that are driving this shift towards non-traditional retail marketplaces (e.g. pop-up stores, fashion trucks), factors that drive consumer loyalty (i.e. re-patronage intentions) and the mediating role of shopping enjoyment in this context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a consumer panel (n = 237) of previous shoppers of non-traditional retailers. Utilising exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), this study identifies possible store and consumer factors that are associated with consumers' patronage of non-traditional retailers. Based on results, we propose a model for non-traditional retail shopping behaviour.

Findings

EFA revealed that quality of personal experience and consumer curiosity were dominant factors explaining variance. Key findings revealed that in-store factors (in-store ambiance, quality and value of products) and consumer factors (consumer curiosity, quality consciousness) influence consumers' re-patronage intentions. This highlights the importance of maintaining quality elements in shopping experiences. Shopping enjoyment was found to mediate relationships, indicating that while not all factors directly impact loyalty, it can be enhanced through pleasurable shopping experiences.

Practical implications

Our findings help retailers understand which factors are driving this dramatic change in consumer behaviour so they may develop better strategies to attract and retain customers. Retailers need to highlight product quality and in-store atmosphere and spark consumers' quality consciousness and curiosity to enhance consumer loyalty.

Originality/value

Despite the rise in popularity, this is the first study to investigate non-traditional retailers comprehensively.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Merve Coskun, Shipra Gupta and Sebnem Burnaz

The purpose of this paper is to understand the effect of store messiness and human crowding on shoppers' competitive behaviours, in-store hoarding and in-store hiding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the effect of store messiness and human crowding on shoppers' competitive behaviours, in-store hoarding and in-store hiding, through the mediating effect of perceived scarcity and perceived competition.

Design/methodology/approach

2 (store messiness: messy × tidy) × 2 (human crowding: high × low) between-subject factorial experiment was conducted online to manipulate retail store atmospheric factors. A total of 154 responses were collected through Amazon MTurk. The hypotheses were analysed using ANOVA and PROCESS (Hayes, 2013) procedure.

Findings

Results suggest that store messiness and human crowding within a fast-fashion store lead to perception of scarcity and competition that further affects competitive behaviours. When consumers experience store messiness, they are likely to hide merchandise in store, thus making it inaccessible for other consumers. Further, when they experience human crowding in the store, they feel that the products will be gone immediately so they have a tendency to hoard them.

Research limitations/implications

This study examined the effects of scarcity perception by studying the case of fast-fashion retailers; generalizability needs to be established across different contexts.

Practical implications

Retailers by manipulating human crowding and store messiness can create a perception of scarcity in their stores, thus enhancing sales. However, they should also pay attention to deviant behaviours such as in-store hoarding and in-store hiding as these behaviours may decrease the store sales.

Originality/value

This research contributed to the retailing literature by finding a significant relationship between human crowding, store messiness and competitive behaviours through perceived scarcity and competition.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Sita Mishra, Gunjan Malhotra and Garima Saxena

The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of in-store private label marketing to impact the attitude of consumers towards private label brands (PLBs) by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of in-store private label marketing to impact the attitude of consumers towards private label brands (PLBs) by influencing consumers' perceived quality variations between the PLBs and national brands.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on “Cue utilisation theory” and focusses on how retailers can influence consumers' perception of quality variations by providing them in-store marketing cues. Data was collected through the mall intercept method in New Delhi, India. Data analysis was done using AMOS 25 and the PROCESS SPSS macro.

Findings

This study establishes the effect of in-store private label marketing in improving consumers' quality perception of PLBs vis-à-vis national brands and thereby leading to a positive attitude towards PLBs. Further, the national brand promotions attitude is found to moderate the relationship between private label marketing and attitude towards PLBs. However, contrary to the authors' expectations, it has a positive effect on this relationship. The study found an insignificant moderation influence of price consciousness.

Originality/value

This study complements existing literature on “Cue utilisation theory” by demonstrating the importance of in-store private label marketing in improving consumers' attitudes towards PLBs. It also extends to fill some gaps in the literature by studying the direct, mediating and moderating relationship among in-store private label marketing, perceived quality variations, price consciousness, national brand promotion attitude and attitude towards PLBs, especially in an emerging market such as India.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Olfa Bouzaabia, Allard C.R. van Riel and Janjaap Semeijn

Traditional retailers still insist on using price, product, and promotion as sources of competitive advantage. This emphasis typically ignores the potential of in‐store

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3935

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional retailers still insist on using price, product, and promotion as sources of competitive advantage. This emphasis typically ignores the potential of in‐store logistics operations in the creation of customer value. A major objective of retail customers is to navigate the retail servicescape in an efficient, convenient, enjoyable and effective manner. In‐store logistics operations largely determine how and to what extent the customer may achieve this objective. However, customer‐perceived indicators of in‐store logistics performance, such as product returns, order information, opening hours, and product availability and accessibility, have been largely ignored in research on retail service. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of in‐store logistics in determining customer outcomes such as store image, satisfaction and loyalty intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is developed based on extant research in the areas of logistics service quality, service logic, store image, and customer loyalty. To test the plausibility of the model, 200 supermarket customers were surveyed in an exploratory field study. Data were analyzed by means of structural equation modeling in SmartPLS.

Findings

Results show that customers may derive a substantial share of their satisfaction from interactions with in‐store logistics operations. Customer‐perceived performance of these operations – an important element of the retail servicescape – influences customer satisfaction directly, but also through its influence on store image.

Research limitations/implications

In‐store logistics dimensions were identified based on exploratory research. A more structured, theory‐driven approach, might yield further insight. Explained variance levels in the outcome variables point at unobserved influences. Future research into the drivers of retail experience satisfaction could further complete the picture.

Originality/value

From a customer perspective, the paper investigates in‐store logistics performance and its effects on customer outcomes in a field study.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2018

Anu C. Haridasan and Angeline Gautami Fernando

The purpose of this study is to compare online and in-store shoppers motivations based on product type.

Downloads
3162

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare online and in-store shoppers motivations based on product type.

Design/methodology/approach

Means-end approach was used to extract motivational factors that drive shoppers channel choice for hedonic and utilitarian products. A total of 100 respondents were interviewed using laddering technique. Hierarchical virtual maps were constructed to determine values associated with attributes and consequences identified by the consumer.

Findings

Shopping motivations differed for online and in-store shoppers based on product type. Variety, value for money and delivery were important attributes for online shoppers. In-store shoppers looked for social interaction and personalized attention. Convenience, affordability and gratification were unique online consequences, while nostalgia and loyalty benefits were specific to in-store hedonic purchases. Self-confidence, availability of wider choices and in-store shopping experience were the values sought for hedonic products. Control of shopping experience was the desired value for utilitarian purchases irrespective of channels.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to shopping motivation research by comparing motives of online and in-store shoppers for hedonic and utilitarian products.

Practical implications

Retailers need to enhance online trust and strengthen in-store customer service for hedonic products. They should also work on the online delivery capabilities and in-store personalized services for utilitarian purchases.

Originality/value

Prior research on deconstructing channel choice motivations based on product type is sparse. This paper uses hierarchy of means-end elements to illustrate attributes and consequences that drive consumer motives and values.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Sung‐Joon Yoon

This paper aims to verify the hypothetical relationships between antecedent and consequence variables of consumer's shopping experiences based on an experiential typology…

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5026

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to verify the hypothetical relationships between antecedent and consequence variables of consumer's shopping experiences based on an experiential typology advocated by Schmitt.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the study takes a holistic view of shopping experiences by adopting three experiential components (sensory, affective, and rational) with a view to uncovering the roles of antecedent (shopping motives) and consequence (impulse buying) of shopping experiences. Specifically, the study seeks to affirm the effects of shopping motives on shopping experiences for three types of retail store (department store, discount store, and internet store) and two product types (perfume and detergent). Second, the study confirms whether store type and product type influence the kind of experience preferred by shoppers and verifies whether types of product and store moderate the relationship between shopping motives and shopping experiences. Thirdly, the study investigates the effects of shopping experiences on impulse buying, with special attention given to the role of store atmospherics.

Findings

The study found that shopping motives had significant effects on shopping experiences. Product‐based shopping motive exerted greater significant influence on shopping experiences than experience‐based motive. The result showed that product type (detergent) was a significant moderator between experience‐based shopping motive and sensory experience. And, both department store and discount store were found to significantly moderate between experience‐based motive and affective experience. It also found that affective shopping experience boosted impulse buying and rational experience decreased it significantly at department store. However, no consistent pattern of influence was detected for the effects of atmospherics on impulse buying when examined by store type.

Originality/value

The study results will offer important retailing implications which accommodate customers' experiential needs that are not only consumer‐centric, but also context specific. The study reflects the growing recognition of the role of sensory stimuli, as they were found to influence advertisement and brand effectiveness. Also, antecedents of experiential shopping in relation to its impact on impulse buying have not been fully explored in the past.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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