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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Tammi Walker, Jenny Shaw, Lea Hamilton, Clive Turpin, Catherine Reid and Kathryn Abel

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of prison staff working with imprisoned women who self-harm in English prisons. In this small-scale study, 14…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of prison staff working with imprisoned women who self-harm in English prisons. In this small-scale study, 14 prison staff in three English prisons were interviewed to examine the strategies currently used by them to support imprisoned women who self-harm.

Design/methodology/approach

Thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006) was used to identify three key themes: “developing a relationship”, “self-help strategies” and “relational interventions”.

Findings

Many staff expressed some dissatisfaction in the techniques available to support the women, and felt their utility can be restricted by the prison regime.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that there is currently a deficit in the provision of training and support for prison staff, who are expected to fulfil a dual role as both custodian and carer of imprisoned women. Further research into prison staff’s perception of the training currently available could highlight gaps between current theory and practice in the management of self-harm and thus indicate content for future training programmes. Research exploring the impact of working with imprisoned women who self-harm is suggested to identify strategies for supporting staff. It must be acknowledged that this is a small-scale qualitative study and the findings are from only three prisons and may not apply to staff in other settings.

Originality/value

Currently few studies have focussed on the perspective of prison staff. This study is one of very few studies which focusses on the techniques and resources available to support the women, from the perspective of the prison staff.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2020

Chloé Constant

The aim of this study is to analyze how the dispositif of sexuality operates toward trans women imprisoned in a male prison in Mexico City, to understand how sexual norms…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to analyze how the dispositif of sexuality operates toward trans women imprisoned in a male prison in Mexico City, to understand how sexual norms that come from the heteropatriarchal model so as from the “internal law” produce transphobic violence.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the queer theory, Foucault’s works on sexuality and power, Segato’s theory about war against women’s bodies and on a fieldwork realized between 2015 and 2019 in Mexico City, with prisoners and former prisoners.

Findings

The sexuality dispositif works in a particular way inside prison. It is the result of the heteropatriarchal model and laws defined by both prisoners and prison workers, all involved in the Mexican war context. The effects are materialized through violence toward trans* women whose bodies serve for rape, male appropriation and exchange between powerful subjects.

Research limitations/implications

This paper produces knowledge about imprisonned trans* people, a very few developped field in prison studies, especially in Latin America.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates how specific violence toward trans* women imprisoned in a male prison in Mexico City deepens violent dynamics that occur out of the prison. So, it questions the meaning of a sentence in the actual Mexican prison system. It may help to think about staff’s training/education to guarantee basic human rights for imprisoned trans* people. Additionally, the theorization of “internal law” could help prison authorities to rethink classification and treatment for prisoners.

Social implications

This paper provide specific knowledge on imprisonned trans* women and helps to think and act different with this people through the understanding of their special vulnerability.

Originality/value

There are only a few papers about imprisoned trans population throughout the world and fewer in Latin America and Mexico. Additionally, this paper aims to overcome the “internal order” as it is always theorized as proper of detainees. It wants to show that the prison order in a Mexico City prison, borns from the meeting of cultural specificities from outside and inside, and from both prisoners, organized crime and prison staff.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Amee Rice, Judith Anne Thompson and Kathy Briffa

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the presence of bladder and bowel symptoms in women recently imprisoned in Western Australian prisons, specifically; stress…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the presence of bladder and bowel symptoms in women recently imprisoned in Western Australian prisons, specifically; stress, urge and mixed urinary incontinence, faecal incontinence, nocturia, nocturnal enuresis and constipation and the impact on the quality of life (QOL).

Design/methodology/approach

Over a 12-month period 29 women, recently released from Western Australia’s female prisons, were surveyed using a questionnaire previously validated for the prison population. The Short Form King’s Health Questionnaire and a modified version of the Manchester Health Questionnaire were used to assess the effects of these symptoms on QOL.

Findings

Of those surveyed only one respondent reported having no bladder or bowel symptoms following release from prison. Trends assessed by Chi-square analysis suggest women imprisoned for any period of time are more likely to develop both bladder and bowel symptoms which persist after release back into the community. A history of substance or alcohol abuse is often concurrent with the presence of symptoms. QOL scores are also lower for those reporting either bladder or bowel symptoms affecting total scores and the domains of both activities of daily living and mental health.

Originality/value

Women imprisoned for any length of time developed bladder and bowel symptoms which had a negative impact on their QOL. Larger studies need to be conducted to investigate these trends and whether small changes in conservative measures can influence outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2019

Diana M. Palma and Jennifer Parr

The imprisoned population is increasing worldwide and is overrepresented in the HIV epidemic. The purpose of this paper is to explore the HIV vulnerability of female…

Abstract

Purpose

The imprisoned population is increasing worldwide and is overrepresented in the HIV epidemic. The purpose of this paper is to explore the HIV vulnerability of female Filipinos who are pre-trial prisoners, as the specific needs of imprisoned women are poorly understood and fewer resources are granted to pre-trial detainees, especially in low and middle-income countries (LMICs).

Design/methodology/approach

This study was based on a Qualitative Descriptive Design. In total, 18 semi-structured interviews were conducted with prisoners and NGO directors. Data were analysed through Framework Analysis, using the individual, social and community categories of the Modified Socio-Ecological Model.

Findings

Results from this study suggest that the prison environment and management practices maximise the HIV vulnerability in the sample. This vulnerability is shaped by low HIV knowledge, combined with the existence of multiple social vulnerabilities prior to incarceration.

Social implications

HIV care in Filipino prisons needs urgent attention from government and international organisations, as it is a major public health and human rights concern. International goals of ending the epidemic by 2030 cannot be reached if efforts are not translated into action within this setting.

Originality/value

In the Philippines, few studies have addressed this issue and little is known about the conditions of Filipino prisons. This paper aims to fill a gap in literature regarding the vulnerability of imprisoned women in LMICs, which is even more limited in examining pre-trial detention.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Claire Powell, Karen Ciclitira and Lisa Marzano

Imprisoned mothers are at increased risk for poor psychological health and psychological distress when separated from their children, so staff need to be highly skilled to…

Abstract

Purpose

Imprisoned mothers are at increased risk for poor psychological health and psychological distress when separated from their children, so staff need to be highly skilled to support the women. However, there is a paucity of research focusing on staff experiences around sensitive issues such as mother–child separation. This study aims to understand the challenges faced by staff and how these might be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative interview study explored the views and experiences of 24 prison-based staff in England working with female prisoners separated from their infants.

Findings

Staff emphasised the challenges of working with separated mothers, specifically the emotional impact of this work, and the impact of the wider criminal justice system on their sense of agency.

Originality/value

A focus on the experience of separation highlights the broader problem of incarcerating women in general. Reducing the number of mother–child separations would mitigate the impact on both women and staff.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Abstract

Details

Ethnographies of Law and Social Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-128-6

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Book part
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Julie Stubbs

Despite the burgeoning research on mass incarceration, women are rarely its focus. Racialised women, whose rates of incarceration have increased more rapidly than other…

Abstract

Despite the burgeoning research on mass incarceration, women are rarely its focus. Racialised women, whose rates of incarceration have increased more rapidly than other groups, are at the best marginal within much of this literature. Within juvenile justice systems, racialised girls and young women are also disproportionately criminalised and remain markedly over-represented but are often overlooked. The absence of racialised women and girls from dominant accounts of punishment and incarceration is a matter of epistemological, ethical and political concern. Intersectionality offers one means to treat racialised women and girls as focal points for research and advocacy directed towards a reduction in criminalisation and incarceration. While intersectionality does not determine how the knowledge produced is deployed, recognising those who have been unrecognised is a necessary first step in striving to bring about positive change through praxis. Flawed mainstream accounts are unlikely to generate strategies that are well-aligned with the needs and interests of those who remain largely invisible.

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The Emerald Handbook of Feminism, Criminology and Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-956-4

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Kelly Lockwood

Abstract

Details

Mothering from the Inside
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-344-0

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Abstract

Details

History & Crime
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-699-6

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Rachel Dolan

There is limited research on the mental health of pregnant women in prison in England, mother and baby unit (MBU) applications and associated factors. Eighty-five pregnant…

Abstract

There is limited research on the mental health of pregnant women in prison in England, mother and baby unit (MBU) applications and associated factors. Eighty-five pregnant women were interviewed in eight different prisons in England, UK. Schedules for the Clinical Assessment of Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) were used to assess mental health; Severity of Dependence Questionnaire (SOD-Q) for drug misuse; Alcohol Use Identification Test (AUDIT) for hazardous drinking and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-II) to identify personality disorder. About 51% of participants had depression and 57% had anxiety. Those with prior social services involvement, diagnosis of personality disorder or history of suicidality were less likely to be admitted to MBUs. The high levels of depression and anxiety can have negative impacts on both the mother and her unborn child. Factors which influence MBU admission suggest those who might benefit most from MBU placement are least likely to be admitted. Other countries offer feasible alternatives to imprisonment for pregnant women and mothers which could be implemented in England.

Details

Mothering from the Inside
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-344-0

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