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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Matthew Lee and Julie Battilana

We consider how the commercialization of social ventures may result from their founders’ personal experiences of commercial organizing. Building on theories of individual…

Abstract

We consider how the commercialization of social ventures may result from their founders’ personal experiences of commercial organizing. Building on theories of individual imprinting, we theorize that the commercialization of social ventures is influenced by two types of commercial experience: parental imprinting from the commercial work experience of a founder’s parents, and work imprinting from a founder’s professional experience within for-profit organizations. We find support for our theory based on analysis of a novel dataset of over 2,000 nascent social ventures and their founders. We further find that the marginal effects of additional work imprinting from a founder’s commercial experience decline with the longevity of this experience. We discuss implications of our findings for literatures on social ventures, imprinting, and hybrid organizations.

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Organizational Hybridity: Perspectives, Processes, Promises
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-355-5

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2017

Achim Oberg, Gili S. Drori and Giuseppe Delmestri

Seeking an answer to the question “how does organizational identity change?” we analyze the visual identity marker of universities, namely logos, as time-related artifacts…

Abstract

Seeking an answer to the question “how does organizational identity change?” we analyze the visual identity marker of universities, namely logos, as time-related artifacts embodying visual scripts. Engaging with the Stinchcombe hypothesis, we identify five processes to the creation of visual identities of organizations: In addition to (1) imprinting (enactment of the contemporary script) and (2) imprinting-cum-inertia (persistent enactment of epochal scripts), we also identify (3) renewal (enactment of an up-to-date epochal script), (4) historization (enactment of a recovered older epochal script), and (5) multiplicity (simultaneous enactment of multiple epochal scripts). We argue that these processes work together to produce contemporary heterogeneity of visualized identity narratives of universities. We illustrate this, first, with a survey of the current-day logos of 814 university emblems in 20 countries from across the world. Second, drawing on archival and interview materials, we analyze the histories of exemplar university logos to illustrate the various time-related processes. Therefore, by interjecting history – as both time and process – into the analysis of the visualization of organizational identity, we both join with the phenomenological and semiotic analysis of visual material as well as demonstrate that history is not merely a fixed factor echoing imprinting and inertia but rather also includes several forms of engagement with temporality that are less deterministic. Overall, we argue that enactment engages with perceptions of time (imaginations of the past, present, and future) and with perceptions fixed by time (epochal imprinting and inertia) to produce heterogeneity in the visualization of organizational identity.

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Multimodality, Meaning, and Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-332-8

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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Sakari Sipola

The purpose of this paper is to examine how entrepreneurship culture affects start-up and venture capital co-evolution during the early evolution of an entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how entrepreneurship culture affects start-up and venture capital co-evolution during the early evolution of an entrepreneurial ecosystem (EE) and its ability to foster the emergence of ambitious entrepreneurship as an outcome of its activity. Unlike studies that capture entrepreneurship culture at the national level, this study focusses specifically on the culture of venture capital-financed entrepreneurship and understanding its implications to the development of venture capital markets and successful firm-level outcomes within ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

Relying on EE and organisational imprinting theory, this study specifies characteristics of venture capital-financed entrepreneurship of Silicon Valley to illustrate the American way of building start-ups and examine whether they have as imprints affected to the entrepreneurship culture and start-up and venture capital co-evolution in Finland during the early evolution of its EE between 1980 and 1997.

Findings

The results illustrate venture capital-financed entrepreneurship culture as a specific example of entrepreneurship culture beneath the national level that can vary across geographies like the findings concerning Finland demonstrate. The findings show that this specific culture matters through having an impact on the structural evolution and performance of EEs and on the ways how they deliver or fail to deliver benefits to entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

The results show that venture capital-financed entrepreneurship and the emergence of success stories as outcomes of start-up and venture capital co-evolution within an EE are connected to a specific type of entrepreneurship culture. This paper also contributes to the literature by connecting the fundamentals of organisational imprinting to EE research.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Jun Zhang, Meng Wang, Pu Liu, Xiaoyan Zhang, Ting Huo, Zhengcan Chen, Chunli Liu, Boyuan Zhang, Shengyuan Zhao and Zhenbin Chen

In this study, a novel glutathione (GSH) surface molecular imprinting polymer (SMIP) was successfully prepared by using macroporous adsorption resins (MAR) as substrate…

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, a novel glutathione (GSH) surface molecular imprinting polymer (SMIP) was successfully prepared by using macroporous adsorption resins (MAR) as substrate, which could separate and purify GSH efficiently.

Design/methodology/approach

SMIP was synthesized by chloromethylated modified MAR (LX1180-Cl) as the substrate, N, N’-methylenebisacrylamide (NMBA) as a crosslinker, GSH as a template, acrylamide (AM) and N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) as functional monomers. The morphology and structure of the polymer were characterized by scanning electron microscope and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy.

Findings

The maximum adsorption capacity toward GSH was 39.0 mg/g and the separation decree had relation to L-cysteine (L-cys) was 4.2. The optimal operation conditions were studied in detail and the got as follows: the molar ratios of NMBA, AM, GSH and NVP, were 7.0, 0.8 and 0.5. The optimal time and temperature were 14 h and 40°C, respectively. The Langmuir and pseudo-first-order model were fitting these adsorption characteristics well.

Practical implications

GSH has a diversity of medicinal and bioactive functions, so the purpose of this study representing a method in separate and purify technology of GSH, which provided a way for the development of medicine.

Originality/value

This contribution provided a novel way to separate GSH from L-cys. Under the optimal conditions, the maximum adsorption capacity toward GSH was 39.0 mg/g and the separation decree had relation to L-cys was 4.2.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Sushanta Kumar Sarma

The purpose of this paper is to understand how social enterprises (SEs) sustain social focus as they shift their legal format from nonprofit to for-profit. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how social enterprises (SEs) sustain social focus as they shift their legal format from nonprofit to for-profit. The investigation is driven by the understanding that historical persistence of organizational action can influence the sustenance of social focus.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study approach and traces the commercialization process of two microfinance organization from India. The data come from interviews and archival documents spanning across the biography of the selected organizations. The constitutive elements of the commercialization process are identified by using the lens of path creation.

Findings

Evidence suggests that the framing of purpose for microfinance as empowerment of women formed the triggering event to path creation. The organizations retained the focus on social goal by adopting a community centered delivery model of self-help groups. The organizational practices adopted after commercialization helped these organization to address the issues of drift actively.

Research limitations/implications

The paper suggests that framing of organizational purpose can play a crucial role in sustaining hybrid character in SEs. It reinforces earlier findings that stakeholders can exert significant influence in balancing social and commercial goal. The aspiration to be identified as a pro-community organization is another critical driver in sustaining social focus. Finally, for SEs to sustain their social focus, proactive engagement with the community should become an integral part of organizational practices.

Originality/value

The paper explores the constitutive elements of path creation and demonstrates the sustenance of social focus through three stages of organizational path development. It also offers insights into the literature on historical imprinting by exploring the internal process through which imprinting is sustained and amplified and by presenting sources and outcome of imprinting.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Shoujun Yin, Fangmei Lu, Yong Yang and Runtian Jing

The purpose of this paper is to provide an imprinting perspective of the organizational culture evolution at a large state-owned heavy equipment manufacturer. It aims at…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an imprinting perspective of the organizational culture evolution at a large state-owned heavy equipment manufacturer. It aims at exploring sensitive periods and the tension between persistence and decay of imprints.

Design/methodology/approach

It employs the case study approach. Both qualitative (interviews) and quantitative (survey) data were collected, from the directors, middle managements, and grass-roots staffs of Dong Fang Turbine Co. Ltd. Based on the set of four scenarios, both within-scenario analysis and cross-scenario analysis were conducted following the “replication logic.”

Findings

New survival threats are more possible to develop sensitive periods with new imprints than transition periods, and the authors suggest organizational culture can be divided into two categories as the institutional sensitive and the local community sensitive.

Originality/value

This study is not only an exploitation of imprinting theories, but also provides a different understanding of organizational evolution, especially in terms of imprints dynamic. Meanwhile, the case shows how institutional environment and local community has shaped differently the organizational culture.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

George Gregoire

Imprint patterning is a new circuit formation process that is based on a well‐established technology called microreplication. Microreplication has been used for many years…

Abstract

Imprint patterning is a new circuit formation process that is based on a well‐established technology called microreplication. Microreplication has been used for many years for making a diverse range of products such as compact discs (CDs), roadside reflective signs and even holographic wrapping paper. As is the case with printed circuit boards microreplication is typically practised where the surface features are very small in relation to the length and width of the product. This paper reports details of a new and potentially disruptive technology that draws on a well‐established imprinting process to provide a comparatively low cost and shorter route to the fabrication of high density interconnections and microvias.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2017

Eunice Y. Rhee, Jade Y. Lo, Mark T. Kennedy and Peer C. Fiss

Drawing on the notion of imprinting, we develop a framework for understanding category emergence and durability by suggesting that the durability of a category reflects…

Abstract

Drawing on the notion of imprinting, we develop a framework for understanding category emergence and durability by suggesting that the durability of a category reflects its emergence conditions. We propose four ideal-typical mechanisms – consensus, proof, fiat, and truce – that arise from differences in the degree of agreement and the centralization of the authority regarding category definitions. Our framework not only relates category durability to emergence but also highlights the role of category promoters and constituencies in an ongoing process of category maintenance. We discuss implications for understanding the dynamics of the categorization process in various social and product market contexts.

Details

From Categories to Categorization: Studies in Sociology, Organizations and Strategy at the Crossroads
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-238-1

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2021

Jun Zhang, Xiaojian Ou, Lin Li, Qianqian Chen, Zifan Zhang, Ting Huo, Xiaoyu Lin, Fangfang Niu, Shengyuan Zhao, Fang We, Hui Li, Chunli Liu, Zhenbin Chen, Sujun Lu, Peng Zhang and Jinian Zhu

A novel grafted temperature-responsive ReO4 Imprinted composite membranes (Re-ICMs) was successfully prepared by using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) resin membranes as…

Abstract

Purpose

A novel grafted temperature-responsive ReO4 Imprinted composite membranes (Re-ICMs) was successfully prepared by using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) resin membranes as substrates, this study aimed to separate and purify ReO effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

Re-ICMs were synthesized by PVDF resin membranes as the substrate, acrylic acid (AA), acrylamide (AM), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) were functional monomers. The morphology and structure of Re-ICMs were characterized by scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

Findings

The maximum adsorption capacity toward ReO4 was 0.1,163 mmol/g and the separation decree had relation to MnO4 was 19.3. The optimal operation conditions were studied detailedly and the results as follows: the molar ratios of AA, AM, EGDMA, ascorbic acid, NH4ReO4, were 0.8, 0.96, 0.02, 0.003 and 0.006. The optimal time and temperature were 20 h and 40°C, respectively. The Langmuir and pseudo-second-order models were fit these adsorption characteristics well.

Practical implications

Rhenium (Re) is mainly used to chemical petroleum and make superalloys for jet engine parts. This study was representing a technology in separate and purify of Re, which provided a method for the development of the petroleum and aviation industry.

Originality/value

This contribution provided a novel method to separate ReO4 from MnO4. The maximum adsorption capacity was 0.1163 mmol/g at 35°C and the adsorption equilibrium time was within 2 h. Meanwhile, the adsorption selectivity rate ReO4/MnO4 was 19.3 and the desorption rate was 78.3%. Controlling the adsorption experiment at 35°C and desorption experiment at 25°C in aqueous solution, it could remain 61.3% of the initial adsorption capacity with the adsorption selectivity rate of 13.3 by 10 adsorption/desorption cycles, a slight decrease, varied from 78.3% to 65.3%, in desorption rate was observed.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Nadia Albu, Cătălin Nicolae Albu, Oana Apostol and Charles H. Cho

Mobilizing a theoretical framework combining institutional logics and “imprinting” lenses, this paper provides an in-depth contextualized analysis of how historical…

Abstract

Purpose

Mobilizing a theoretical framework combining institutional logics and “imprinting” lenses, this paper provides an in-depth contextualized analysis of how historical imprints affect social and environmental reporting (SER) practices in Romania, a post-communist country in Eastern Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a qualitative field study with a diverse dataset including regulations, publicly available reports and interviews with multiple actors involved in the SER field in Romania. The authors follow a reflexive approach in constructing the narratives by mobilizing their personal experience and understanding of the field to analyze the rich empirical material.

Findings

The authors identify a blend of logics that combine local and Western conceptualizations of business responsibilities and explain how the transition from a communist ideology to the free market economy affected SER practices in Romania. The authors also highlight four major imprints and document their longitudinal development, evidencing three main patterns: persistence, transformation and decay. The authors find that the deep connections that form between logics and imprints explain the cohabitation of logics rather than their straight replacement.

Originality/value

The paper contributes by evidencing the role of imprints' dynamics in the institutionalization of SER logics. The authors claim that the persistence (decay) of imprints from a former regime such as communism hinders (facilitates) the institutionalization of Western SER logics. Transformation instead has more uncertain effects. The pattern that an imprint takes hinges upon its usefulness for business interests.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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