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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Frank W. Agbola and Maylene Y. Damoense

This study seeks to examine empirically import demand for total pulses, chickpeas and lentils in India based on the concept of unit root and cointegration.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine empirically import demand for total pulses, chickpeas and lentils in India based on the concept of unit root and cointegration.

Design/methodology/approach

The Stock‐Watson dynamic OLS (DOLS) model – which is robust to small sample and eliminates simultaneity bias – is used to derive the long‐run price, income and urbanisation elasticities of import demand. The data covers the period 1970‐2000.

Findings

Results indicate that real GDP, relative price and urbanisation are the key determinants of import demand for pulses in India. The estimated long‐run elasticities of import demand with respect to income (relative price) are 0.4 (−1.7) for chickpeas, 0.56 (−0.87) for lentils and 0.36 (0.00) for total pulses. The estimated long‐run elasticities of import demand with respect to urbanisation are 9.9 for chickpeas, zero for lentils and 7.2 for total pulses. The policy implications of the results are discussed.

Originality/value

Provides evidence that the response of import demand for pulses to key determinants differ substantially from product to product.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2019

Nomfundo Portia Vacu and Nicholas Odhiambo

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of aggregate and dis-aggregated import demand for Ghana for the period from 1985 to 2015.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of aggregate and dis-aggregated import demand for Ghana for the period from 1985 to 2015.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed the autoregressive distributed lag bounds testing approach.

Findings

The long-run finding show that aggregate import demand (AIMD) is positively determined by exports of goods and services and consumer spending, but negatively determined by foreign exchange reserves. It is found that consumer spending is the key positive determinant of the import demand of consumer goods, while foreign exchange reserves, trade liberalisation policy and relative import price are negative determinants. It is found that import demand of intermediate goods is positively determined by consumer spending, government spending and investment spending. The long-run findings further confirm that import demand of capital goods is negatively determined by relative import price. In the short run, the findings suggest that AIMD is positively affected by exports of goods and services, investment spending and consumer spending, but negatively affected by foreign exchange reserves. Import demand of consumer goods is positively influenced by consumer spending, but negatively determined by relative import price. Finally, import demand for intermediate goods is found to be positively determined by investment spending and government spending, while import demand for capital goods is positively associated with exports of goods and services and trade liberalisation policy in the previous period.

Originality/value

A number of studies have looked at the determinants of import demand, focussing on the aggregated import demand. This study adds the component of dis-aggregated import demand, as it assist in dealing with the issues of bias.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

Andrew Muhammad, Anthony R. Delmond and Frank K. Nti

Chinese beer consumption has undergone major changes within the last decade. The combination of a growing middle class and greater exposure to foreign products has…

Abstract

Purpose

Chinese beer consumption has undergone major changes within the last decade. The combination of a growing middle class and greater exposure to foreign products has resulted in a significant increase in beer imports. The authors examined transformations in this market and how beer preferences have changed over time. This study focuses on changes is origin-specific preferences (e.g. German beer and Mexican beer) as reflected by habit formation (i.e. dynamic consumption patterns) and changes in demand sensitivity to expenditure and prices.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors estimated Chinese beer demand – differentiated by source – using a generalized dynamic demand model that accounted for habit formation and trends, as well as the immediate and long-run effects of expenditures and prices on demand. The authors employed a rolling regression procedure that allowed for model estimates to vary with time. Preference changes were inferred from the changing demand estimates, with a particular focus on changes in habit formation, expenditure allocating behaviour, and own-price responsiveness.

Findings

Results suggest that Chinese beer preferences have changed significantly over the last decade, increasing for Mexican beer, Dutch beer and Belgian beer. German beer once dominated the Chinese market. However, all indicators suggest that German beer preferences are declining.

Originality/value

Although China is the world's third largest beer importing country behind the United States and France. Few studies have focused on this market. While dynamic analyses of alcoholic beverage demand are not new, this is the first study to examine the dynamics of imported beer preferences in China and implications for exporting countries.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Abstract

Details

Panel Data Econometrics Theoretical Contributions and Empirical Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-836-0

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Abiodun S. Bankole, Olanrewaju Olaniyan, M. Adetunji Babatunde and Rifkatu Nghargbu

The purpose of this paper is to estimate Nigeria's audiovisual services import demand using foreign football transmitted through digital satellite television (DSTV) as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate Nigeria's audiovisual services import demand using foreign football transmitted through digital satellite television (DSTV) as a case study. The major focus is on whether such imports effectively replace local recreation in watching domestic football.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined descriptive statistics. The methodology employed is a combination of descriptive analysis and cross‐sectional regression.

Findings

The paper's analytical framework establishes a link between the conventional import demand and demand for football functions, while the estimated empirical counterpart found that the demand for foreign football via cross‐border satellite transmission is a statistically significant function of taste for foreign football, quality, and entertainment. While descriptive statistics indicate respondents’ preference for foreign football, the test of significance rejected the hypothesis that the demand for foreign football broadcast service imports has replaced demand for domestic football as an entertaining sport. In addition, the demand for foreign football broadcast is fairly inelastic, as a greater percentage of the respondents will watch foreign football even if the cost of subscription or cost of paying per view in the viewing centers increase.

Originality/value

The paper describes the first of this type of research to be conducted in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Seema Narayan and Paresh Kumar Narayan

This paper aims to estimate a disaggregated import demand model for Fiji using relative prices, total consumption, investment expenditure and export expenditure variables…

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3818

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to estimate a disaggregated import demand model for Fiji using relative prices, total consumption, investment expenditure and export expenditure variables for the period 1970 to 2000.

Design/methodology/approach

The recently developed bounds testing approach to cointegration to test for a long run relationship is used, while the autoregressive distributed lag model is used to estimate short run and long run elasticities. These methodologies are shown to perform well in small sample sizes, particularly given that the bounds F‐test critical values for small sample sizes generated by Narayan in 2004 and 2005 are used.

Findings

Amongst the key results it is found: a long run cointegration relationship among the variables when import demand is the dependent variable; and import demand to be inelastic and statistically significant at the 1 per cent level with respect to all the explanatory variables in both the long‐run and the short‐run.

Originality/value

The disaggregated import demand model estimated here provides a complete picture of the determinants of Fiji's imports. This model can be used by Fijian policy makers to draw pertinent policies and forecast import demand for Fiji.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2018

Yongqi Feng and Tianshu Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to provide a better understanding of the driving forces and structural changes of China as a market provider for Korea. This paper gives the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a better understanding of the driving forces and structural changes of China as a market provider for Korea. This paper gives the answers for the following questions: How do China’s final demands trigger the growth of its imports from Korea? And what’s the impact of China’s final demands on the import in different industries?

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the Multi-Regional Input-Output model and World Input-Output Table database, this paper constructs the non-competitive imports input-output (IO) table of China to Korea. According to this table, we can calculate the induced imports coefficient and comprehensive induced import coefficients of China’s four final demands for imports from Korea in the 56 industries in China.

Findings

Among the four driving forces, the strongest one is changes in inventories and valuables. The impact of final consumption expenditure and fixed capital formation is much lower than that of changes in inventories and valuables, but they have a broader impact for the 56 industries. This paper finds out the China’s import induction of the final demands to Korea peaked in 2005 and 2010 and decreased greatly in 2014, so the position of China as market provider for Korea will no longer rise substantially, contrarily it will be in a steady state.

Originality/value

First, this paper constructs the non-competitive IO table to analyze the market provider issues between two countries and provides practical ways and methods for studies on the issues of imports and market provider. Second, this paper investigates the different roles of four final demands on driving force of China as market provider for Korea and the structural changes of China as a market provider for Korea among 56 industries from 2000 to 2014.

Details

Journal of Korea Trade, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1229-828X

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

M. Adetunji Babatunde and Festus O. Egwaikhide

The purpose of this paper is to present an empirical analysis of the aggregated import demand behavior for Nigeria using annual data between 1980 and 2006.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an empirical analysis of the aggregated import demand behavior for Nigeria using annual data between 1980 and 2006.

Design/methodology/approach

The bounds test analysis was used to estimate the long‐run relationship between imports and its determinants.

Findings

Test results show that imports, income and relative prices are cointegrated. The estimated long‐run elasticities of import demand with respect to income and relative prices are 2.48 and −0.133, respectively.

Originality/value

These results suggest that the Marshall‐Lerner condition are not satisfied for Nigeria.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 1998

D.A.G. Draper

Abstract

Details

Explaining Unemployment: Econometric Models for the Netherlands
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-847-6

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Wei Chen, Mary A. Marchant and Andrew Muhammad

The purpose of this paper is to estimate China's demand for imported soybeans and soybean oil from both country‐of‐origin and product form perspectives.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate China's demand for imported soybeans and soybean oil from both country‐of‐origin and product form perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

A differential production approach is used to estimate China's demand for imported soybeans and soybean oil. The empirical demand estimates are then used to derive conditional and unconditional elasticities of demand for each exporting country with respect to changes in domestic and import prices, and the price of resources used in soybean meal and oil production.

Findings

Results indicate that both country‐of‐origin and product form competition exist in the Chinese market. Estimation results indicate that China's soybean meal prices significantly impacted its soybean and soybean oil imports. Seasonality is detected in China's soybean imports, but not in soybean oil imports.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that, in addition to country‐of‐origin competition, product form competition should be considered when analyzing China's soybean demand.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to a better understanding of China's soybean import market by integrating both country‐of‐origin competition and product form competition into a single demand framework.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

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