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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Helen Miller and Reza Kiani

Prevalence of hearing impairment is quite common in people with learning disabilities (double jeopardy). However, this debilitating co‐morbidity remains largely undetected…

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Abstract

Prevalence of hearing impairment is quite common in people with learning disabilities (double jeopardy). However, this debilitating co‐morbidity remains largely undetected by carers and professionals due to presence of additional disabilities and complex clinical presentation in this population on the one hand, and lack of specialist hearing impairment service provision and difficulty in accessing generic audiology services on the other hand. This article aims to provide practical guidance on assessment and management of hearing impairment in people with learning disabilities by offering a narrative review of available literature on gaps in service delivery.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Qiubin Huang and Mengyuan Xiong

This paper aims to examine the effects of managerial ability (MA) on the likelihood and the timeliness of goodwill impairment and explore whether the desirable effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of managerial ability (MA) on the likelihood and the timeliness of goodwill impairment and explore whether the desirable effect of MA vary with the degree of agency problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a unified framework to simultaneously examine the effects of MA on the likelihood and the timeliness of goodwill impairment by incorporating a market-based impairment indicator (denoted as BTM), MA and the interaction of BTM with MA to this study’s regression model to account for the likelihood of goodwill impairment. BTM addresses the timeliness of goodwill impairment.

Findings

This study finds that firms with higher MA have lower likelihood of goodwill impairment, and such firms are more likely to recognize goodwill impairment in a timely manner when the underlying value of goodwill is economically impaired. This desirable effect of MA is more pronounced in non-state-owned enterprise (SOEs) and firms without chief executive officer (CEO) duality.

Practical implications

Firms can reduce the losses arising from goodwill impairment by enhancing the ability of their management teams combined with improved corporate governance structure.

Originality/value

This paper provides novel insights on understanding the role of MA in not only reducing the likelihood but also enhancing the timeliness of goodwill impairment. The findings help advance the upper echelons theory by uncovering the heterogenous effects of executives with different levels of ability.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Stacy M. Kelly

Assessment techniques for students with visual impairments (that is, those who are blind or have low vision) are designed to meet their unique learning needs…

Abstract

Assessment techniques for students with visual impairments (that is, those who are blind or have low vision) are designed to meet their unique learning needs. Considerations for assessment both within the general curriculum and expanded core curriculum (ECC) for students with visual impairments are presented. The roles of educational team members are discussed, especially as related to special education service providers trained to teach students with visual impairments. The heterogeneous nature of the population of students with visual impairments and the importance of assessment as a collaborative process are additional discussion points presented within this chapter for specific consideration.

Details

Traditional and Innovative Assessment Techniques for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-890-1

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Sara E. Green and Brianna Vice

The Social Model of Disability, which views social and economic barriers rather than individual bodily differences as the main sources of disadvantage faced by people…

Abstract

Purpose

The Social Model of Disability, which views social and economic barriers rather than individual bodily differences as the main sources of disadvantage faced by people living with impairments, has gained considerable traction in the literatures of both disability studies and the sociology of disability over the past several decades. Despite this success, however, concern has been expressed that there is a dearth of empirical evidence to back Social Model claims that people with disabilities are not emotionally distressed by their bodily differences or functional limitations, but rather by the layers of social and economic disadvantage imposed on top of their impairments.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Using results of a community survey in a small town in Florida, we examine the degree to which workforce participation and other social and economic disadvantages mediate the relationship between subjective well-being and the presence of functional impairments or self-described disability identity.

Findings

We find that study participants who report functional impairments or identify as disabled report lower levels of subjective well-being than participants who do not. Findings also suggest, however, that these differences in subjective well-being can be explained by lack of workforce participation and other aspects of social inclusion and economic disadvantages that are associated with functional impairment and disability identity. Results indicate that work is one, but not the only, important aspect of community participation that mediates between disability experience and well-being. Results also problematize the conflation of functional impairment and disability identity.

Implications

Findings point to a need for future qualitative and quantitative research to address differences between functional impairment status and disability identity and to evaluate the relative importance of work and other forms of social inclusion and access to economic recourses to the well-being of people living with impairments and disability.

Originality/value

Findings of this study provide empirical support for, but also add complexity to, the Social Model perspective. They can be used to provide guidance to community leaders in terms of ways in which the lives of residents with disabilities might be improved.

Details

Factors in Studying Employment for Persons with Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-606-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 January 2011

Stacy M. Kelly and Christine Clark-Bischke

Defined functionally, having low vision can mean the inability to read newsprint even with best correction (when wearing conventional eyeglasses or contact lenses) (Maino

Abstract

Defined functionally, having low vision can mean the inability to read newsprint even with best correction (when wearing conventional eyeglasses or contact lenses) (Maino, 1993). Other functional definitions of low vision refer to a loss of vision that may be severe enough to hinder an individual's ability to complete daily activities such as reading, cooking, or walking outside safely, while still retaining some degree of useable vision. Low vision is decreased visual performance that prevents performance to full capacity compared with a typically sighted person of the same age and gender. It may be a consequence of reduced acuity, abnormal visual field, reduced contrast sensitivity, or other ocular dysfunction (Faye, 1984). This definition includes people who are legally blind and those who have a more significant amount of remaining vision.

Details

History of Special Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-629-5

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2007

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2016

Stacy M. Kelly

This chapter outlines the progression in the development of educational settings and services for students with visual impairments over the past several hundred years…

Abstract

This chapter outlines the progression in the development of educational settings and services for students with visual impairments over the past several hundred years. Information is provided that explains how the education systems have advanced to the present state for students who are blind or have low vision. An explanation of the professionals who support the unique disability-specific needs of students with visual impairments in inclusive settings is also presented. This chapter concludes with a discussion of current issues related to the inclusion of students with visual impairments including personnel shortages, technological developments, and unemployment rates.

Details

General and Special Education Inclusion in an Age of Change: Impact on Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-541-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Frances Mary D’Andrea and Yue-Ting Siu

For students who are blind or visually impaired, technology enables greater access to the educational curriculum, immediate and independent access to information, and full…

Abstract

For students who are blind or visually impaired, technology enables greater access to the educational curriculum, immediate and independent access to information, and full participation in community and citizenship. This chapter reviews research on technology use by students with visual impairments, and highlights effective practices, promising developments, and ongoing challenges. The authors discuss the implications of these advancements on policy, instruction, professional development, and future research.

Details

Efficacy of Assistive Technology Interventions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-641-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2015

Stacy M. Kelly

The role of the teacher of students with visual impairments and the role of the orientation and mobility specialist are presented and discussed in this chapter. Background…

Abstract

The role of the teacher of students with visual impairments and the role of the orientation and mobility specialist are presented and discussed in this chapter. Background information about the population of students who are visually impaired and their unique disability-specific characteristics is also provided to situate the role of vision specialists within the context of the population that they serve. The population of students served by teachers of students with visual impairments and orientation and mobility specialists is incredibly diverse. Vision specialists enable students who are visually impaired to overcame barriers and create educational successes within the Common Core and Expanded Core Curriculum. The Expanded Core Curriculum is an additional set of disability-specific skills and a framework used in the planning, instruction, and assessment of student learning. Vision specialists work closely with parents and school professionals to adapt the educational environment and support their students.

Details

Interdisciplinary Connections to Special Education: Key Related Professionals Involved
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-663-8

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Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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