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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Shulamit Ramon

This chapter focuses on the value of TED Lectures on the issue of domestic violence and abuse (DVA). It outlines a generic framework with which to understand and analyse…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the value of TED Lectures on the issue of domestic violence and abuse (DVA). It outlines a generic framework with which to understand and analyse the impact of TED Lectures on a theme as complex as DVA is, in the context of popular Western culture. It does so by looking in details at the Ted Lecture of Leslie Morgan Steiner from 2012, which aims to answer the question ‘Why Domestic Violence Victims Don't Leave: Crazy Love’ through her own personal experience.

In the attempt to understand the impact of this TED Lecture we look at the literature on TED Lectures, the unique aspects of DVA, who is the presenter, the impact and its components, the active viewers who sent written comments on the Ted Lectures, the technical effect, the comparison with two other Ted Lectures on DVA, ending by identifying gaps in the analysis provided by the three Ted Lectures.

Presenters share with the viewers their personal experience, as well as their experience as activists in organisations and programmes set out to change the status quo in the field of DVA.

The lectures impact through layers of emotional and intellectual facets, which speak to the individuals viewing them through the lens of their own emotional and intellectual experiences of DVA on the one hand, while on the other hand being also influenced by the mode of presentation and the presenter her/himself.

Details

Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Barry Armandi, Jeannette Oppedisano and Herbert Sherman

Leadership theory has little value if it cannot be applied to real world situations. A summary review of the literature on leadership theory is provided here first. A…

Abstract

Leadership theory has little value if it cannot be applied to real world situations. A summary review of the literature on leadership theory is provided here first. A disguised real case concerning Ted Shade, a Vice‐President at Galactic Chips, Inc. is then provided which describes a manager who is extremely task‐oriented. The case analysis follows. It includes questions and answers which connect leadership theory to case specifics and requires learners to analyze the case using differing leadership models.

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Management Decision, vol. 41 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Abstract

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Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

John E. Elliott

This article gives a centenary appreciation of the contributions to economic thought of Joseph A. Schumpeter, with special focus on his work, The Theory of Economic

Abstract

This article gives a centenary appreciation of the contributions to economic thought of Joseph A. Schumpeter, with special focus on his work, The Theory of Economic Development (TED). It proceeds, first, by providing an overview of Schumpeter's life and works; secondly, by giving an interpretative exposition of the main themes of TED, and, thirdly, Schumpeter's broader “economic sociology” in terms of the place of these ideas in the history of economic thought; fourthly, by examining the reception to TED and the impact of it and Schumpeter's dynamic methodology on the discipline.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 12 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Zamzami Zainuddin, Yin Zhang, Xiuhan Li, Samuel Kai Wah Chu, Saifullah Idris and Cut Muftia Keumala

This paper aims to analyze the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 48 selected empirical articles published during 2017 and 2018.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 48 selected empirical articles published during 2017 and 2018.

Design/methodology/approach

The inductive content analysis was used as a methodology to investigate the content of flipped classroom research, including subject-specific areas, methodological approaches, technology tools or platforms, the most frequently used trending searches, countries of research, positive impacts and challenges.

Findings

The results of the analysis were interpreted using descriptive analysis, percentages and frequencies. This analysis found that various subjects were implemented in flipped classroom learning, and some technological tools were also used to enhance teaching and learning. Analysis of the impact revealed that the flipped classroom yielded positive learning outcomes on students’ learning activities such as learning motivation and engagement, social interaction and self-directed learning skills. Meanwhile, the most significant challenges encountered by the instructor were the lack of students’ motivation to watch pre-recorded video lectures or to study the contents outside of the class time.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that the flipped classroom concept might be effective in promoting twenty-first-century learning skills and developing the technology and information literacy competency based on national standards.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Michael H. Morris

There are those who suggest the experiential and action-oriented nature of entrepreneurship makes traditional content-focused lecture a less appropriate pedagogical…

Abstract

There are those who suggest the experiential and action-oriented nature of entrepreneurship makes traditional content-focused lecture a less appropriate pedagogical approach when teaching entrepreneurship courses. This chapter challenges such suggestions, arguing that the lecture should be the centerpiece of entrepreneurship education, augmented by experiential learning tools and other pedagogical approaches. Such a blended model, when built around the lecture, has the potential to greatly enhance learning, improve student retention, encourage student thought and reflection, and better develop entrepreneurial skills and competencies associated with the entrepreneurial mindset. The chapter also summarizes the nature of the content delivered through entrepreneurship courses, classifying this content into three general categories, and concluding that this core content is substantive, complex, and highly inter-related. These characteristics reinforce the importance of great lectures for moving entrepreneurship education forward.

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The Great Debates in Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-076-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1970

UNTIL 1952 Queen's University was fortunate to have one main library building. With the establishment of the Institute of Clinical Science in the hospital area 1½ miles…

Abstract

UNTIL 1952 Queen's University was fortunate to have one main library building. With the establishment of the Institute of Clinical Science in the hospital area 1½ miles from the main university site, the formation of a separate medical library near the hospitals was considered essential.

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New Library World, vol. 71 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Alan McKinlay, Chris Carter, Eric Pezet and Stewart Clegg

The premise of the paper is that Foucault's concept of governmentality has important but unacknowledged implications for understanding strategy. Highlighting the strengths…

Abstract

Purpose

The premise of the paper is that Foucault's concept of governmentality has important but unacknowledged implications for understanding strategy. Highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the governmentality approach, the paper seeks to suggest how governmentality can be used to conceptualise strategy. More generally, the paper seeks to contribute to the body of research on governmentality articulated by authors such as Peter Miller, Ted O'Leary and Nikolas Rose.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reprises the argument that accounting is constitutive of social relations. It proceeds to discuss Peter Miller, Ted O'Leary and Nikolas Rose's seminal contributions to the conceptual development of governmentality. In outlining their work, the paper highlights the significance accorded to the emergence of standard costing and scientific management and its subsequent role in developing both the strategies and structures of managerial capitalism. The paper examines how this, in turn, was pivotal to the emergence of strategy as an important means through which organisations began to understand and conceive of themselves. The paper rehearses the standard criticisms made of governmentality within the accounting literature, before arguing that the concept emerges intact from the critique levelled against it. Proceeding to summarise Foucault's radical conception of power, the paper notes the elusiveness of Foucault's relationship with strategy. Elaborating on the nature of governmentality, the paper employs the concept to re‐examine the managerial revolution. The objective is to explore its implications for understanding strategy.

Findings

The paper builds on the innovative work published in accounting on governmentality to construct an account of the emergence of the managerial revolution. This yields important insights on strategy. In particular, the paper challenges Chandler, arguing that the birth of strategy is best seen as a post‐hoc rationalisation produced by the emergence of systematic management and standard costing. The paper explores how governmentality might be developed to study strategy. The overarching message of the paper is that there is a need to rethink strategy as a language and social practice. Strategy, therefore, must be understood as much as a cultural and political project than as an economic one.

Originality/value

The paper highlights how strategy can be regarded as a cultural and political phenomenon. This opens up the possibility of accounts of strategy that are firmly grounded within studies of organisations, politics and society. Dispensing with neo‐economic notions of strategy, the paper advocates writing Foucault into strategic management.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Book part
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Silviya Svejenova and Lærke H⊘jgaard Christiansen

This study explores how creative leadership unfolds in the pursuit of social purpose. Drawing on the case of an architectural firm’s development of novel social housing…

Abstract

This study explores how creative leadership unfolds in the pursuit of social purpose. Drawing on the case of an architectural firm’s development of novel social housing model, we identify claims of three creative leadership processes and of scaling up for social impact. The study expands the conceptualization of creative leadership to the context of social change. It also adds to the understanding of creative industries by suggesting social purpose as a distinctive, yet underexplored driver of innovation and a source of different balancing act, as well as an important frontier for research on and practice in the creative industries.

Details

Frontiers of Creative Industries: Exploring Structural and Categorical Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-773-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Ted Brown, Brett Williams, Shapour Jaberzadeh, Louis Roller, Claire Palermo, Lisa McKenna, Caroline Wright, Marilyn Baird, Michal Schneider‐Kolsky, Lesley Hewitt, Tangerine Holt, Maryam Zoghi and Jenny Sim

Computers and computer‐assisted instruction are being used with increasing frequency in the area of health science student education, yet students’ attitudes towards the…

Abstract

Computers and computer‐assisted instruction are being used with increasing frequency in the area of health science student education, yet students’ attitudes towards the use of e‐learning technology and computer‐assisted instruction have received limited attention to date. The purpose of this study was to investigate the significant predictors of health science students’ attitudes towards e‐learning and computer‐assisted instruction. All students enrolled in health science programmes (n=2885) at a large multi‐campus Australian university in 2006‐2007, were asked to complete a questionnaire. This included the Online Learning Environment Survey (OLES), the Computer Attitude Survey (CAS), and the Attitude Toward Computer‐Assisted Instruction Semantic Differential Scale (ATCAISDS). A multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine the significant predictors of health science students’ attitudes to e‐learning. The Attitude Toward Computers in General (CASg) and the Attitude Toward Computers in Education (CASe) subscales from the CAS were the dependent (criterion) variables for the regression analysis. A total of 822 usable questionnaires were returned, accounting for a 29.5 per cent response rate. Three significant predictors of CASg and five significant predictors of CASe were found. Respondents’ age and OLES Equity were found to be predictors on both CAS scales. Health science educators need to take the age of students and the extent to which students perceive that they are treated equally by a teacher/tutor/instructor (equity) into consideration when looking at determinants of students’ attitudes towards e‐learning and technology.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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