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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Iman Naderi and Audhesh K. Paswan

This study aims to investigate how narcissistic consumers perceive and respond to variations in price and store image in retail settings.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how narcissistic consumers perceive and respond to variations in price and store image in retail settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected from a sample of 248 respondents who participated in an experiment with a 2 × 2 × 2 between-subjects design.

Findings

The findings show that while narcissists and non-narcissists do not differ in their perceptions of product quality, they show completely different behavioral intentions. For instance, narcissistic consumers ascribe more importance to store image than to product price, whereas price is more critical in non-narcissists’ decision-making.

Research limitations/implications

Using a young sample and only one product category (i.e. clothing) may affect the generalization of the findings. The inherent drawback of experiments (i.e. gaining internal validity at the cost of external validity) is another limitation of this work.

Practical implications

The construct of narcissism plays a critical role in the way people evaluate products’ symbolic value and ultimately decide to purchase goods from a store which has a certain type of image, including the expected price of the merchandise. Therefore, the findings of this study have significant managerial implications for critical areas of retail business such as segmentation using narcissism, store image management and merchandise pricing.

Originality/value

Despite a long history in social and clinical psychology, few empirical studies have examined narcissism and its impact on consumer behavior. The present study is an attempt to address this gap in retail settings and provides insights into the joint effects of product price and store image on narcissists’ purchase behavior.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2020

Ehsan Naderi, Iman Naderi and Bimal Balakrishnan

This study aims to investigate the combined effects of product design and environment congruence on consumers’ aesthetic, affective and behavioral responses.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the combined effects of product design and environment congruence on consumers’ aesthetic, affective and behavioral responses.

Design/methodology/approach

Two lab experiments with a 2 (high-level design cues vs low-level design cues) × 2 (congruent environment vs non-congruent environment) between-subjects design were conducted to test the hypotheses. The experimental stimuli (product: digital camera; environment: product display in a retail environment) were presented in a 3D simulation environment using a large TV (Experiment 1) and a stereoscopic virtual reality headset.

Findings

The results support the notion that product design cues elicit more positive aesthetic and affective responses. Environment congruence, on the other hand, plays a moderating role; product design cues elicit more favorable consumer responses in a congruent environment. In contrast, no such effect was found in a non-congruent environment.

Practical implications

Creating a congruent environment is only effective for well-designed products. In contrast, for products with low-level design elements, the congruence of promotional environment is not instrumental and may not elicit more favorable responses. Hence, such products can simply be presented in a generic display, especially considering the significant costs associated with designing, building and setting up a congruent display.

Originality/value

Despite the empirical findings supporting the significant role of product design and environment congruence on consumers’ perceptual and behavioral responses, there is a paucity of research on the combined effect of these two factors. The present investigation is an attempt to fill this gap and challenges the generalizations made in previous research suggesting that a product’s environment must be aligned with the design elements embedded in the product.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2018

Iman Naderi and Eric Van Steenburg

This research aims to shed greater light on millennials’ green behavior by examining four psychographic variables (selfless altruism, frugality, risk aversion, and time…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to shed greater light on millennials’ green behavior by examining four psychographic variables (selfless altruism, frugality, risk aversion, and time orientation) that may be relevant to millennials’ motives to engage in environmental activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of younger millennials (n = 276; age = 18 to 30) using a self-administered questionnaire. The data were then analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM) technique.

Findings

Overall, the results of the study reveal that rational and self-oriented rather than emotional and others-oriented motives lead millennials to act pro-environmentally.

Practical implications

The findings of this study have implications for environmental advocates, policymakers and green marketers. For instance, the findings suggest that environmental regulators and lawmakers should continue their efforts to provide economic incentives to encourage pro-environmental purchases among millennials. Additionally, marketers of green products may pursue self-directed targeting strategies in promoting green products among millennials.

Originality/value

Millennials grasp the environmental consequences of their actions and have the education, motivation and social awareness to participate in the green movement. However, they have not truly begun to fully integrate their beliefs and actions. The present study is an initial attempt to address this issue by investigating various psychological factors that are relevant to the millennials’ core behavioral motives.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2019

Mohammadali Zolfagharian and Iman Naderi

The purpose of this paper is to extend the current understanding of human resource management (HRM) challenges facing franchise businesses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the current understanding of human resource management (HRM) challenges facing franchise businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative investigation, including eight in-depth interviews and 66 semi-structured interviews with various franchise stakeholders as well as 42 participant observations, was conducted in North America to answer the research questions.

Findings

Six major conclusions emerged from the conceptual and empirical work. The findings, for instance, reveal that human resources in franchise businesses lacks in motivation and skills, and franchisees’ distance from the ideal mix of autonomy and risk-aversion determines psychological and financial distress in the system.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that when firms choose the franchising path as a means of leapfrogging resource constraints, they will experience new and more challenging HRM complications for several reasons. Therefore, decision-makers at both franchisor and franchisee firms need to address these new HRM challenges proactively by recognizing their possibility and emergence and by engaging in cooperative learning with one another.

Originality/value

While HRM practices can “make or break” franchise systems, some important research questions still remain unanswered in this context. In an attempt to narrow this gap, and using a qualitative approach, this work identifies and classifies the key HRM challenges facing the franchise industry. Based on the finding, a conceptual model is proposed and discussed.

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Iman Naderi, Ahmad Sharbatoghlie and Ahmadreza Vafaeimehr

Lack of a consistent standardized housing pricing system in Iran has led housing valuation to become solely dependent on appraisers' opinions. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Lack of a consistent standardized housing pricing system in Iran has led housing valuation to become solely dependent on appraisers' opinions. The purpose of this paper is to investigate some behavioral aspects of real estate decision makers, i.e. buyers and appraisers.

Design/methodology/approach

First, and based on a content analysis of the valuation literature, a preliminary housing valuation model is proposed. This model is then contextualized and tested on two separate samples of 23 appraisers and 145 buyers, using interviewing technique and self‐administered questionnaires.

Findings

This study shows that buyers and appraisers may have different views about property valuation and that the appraisal process of residential housing in Iran contains substantial inconsistency with respect to buyers' needs. In addition, it was found that financial status is a significant factor affecting buyers' attitude toward housing valuation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings may shed greater light on understanding behavioral aspects of the valuation process, in general, and the importance of individual differences, in particular, that could be applicable to different markets or different types of properties.

Practical implications

The model developed in this study could be used by both appraisers, as a guideline in valuation process, and buyers, as a check‐list of attributes they choose to consider in the decision‐making process. It could also be used by policy makers, banks and other financial institution providing mortgage loans, and real estate agencies, to name a few.

Originality/value

The lack of conformity between buyers and appraisers on property valuation may result in buyers paying a higher price for amenities that may not be considered crucial from their perspectives. As a result, this study reveals the necessity of creating an integrated appraisal system based on customer needs. This housing valuation model is the first and most comprehensive framework developed and contextualized for the Tehran housing market. In addition, this study is one of the few studies examining both demand‐ and supply‐sides of the housing market simultaneously.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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