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Article

Noluxolo Gcaza, Rossouw von Solms, Marthie M. Grobler and Joey Jansen van Vuuren

The purpose of this paper is to define and delineate cyber security culture. Cyber security has been a concern for many years. In an effort to mitigate the cyber security…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define and delineate cyber security culture. Cyber security has been a concern for many years. In an effort to mitigate the cyber security risks, technology-centred measures were deemed to be the ultimate solution. Nowadays, however, it is accepted that the process of cyber security requires much more than mere technical controls. On the contrary, it now demands a human-centred approach, including a cyber security culture. Although the role of cultivating a culture in pursuing cyber security is well appreciated, research focusing intensely on cyber security culture is still in its infancy. Additionally, knowledge on the subject is not clearly bounded and defined.

Design/methodology/approach

General morphological analysis (GMA) is used to define, structure and analyse the cyber security environment culture.

Findings

This paper identifies the most important variables in cultivating a cyber security culture.

Research implications

The delineation of the national cyber security domain will contribute to the relatively new domain of cyber security culture. They contribute to the research community by means of promoting a shared and common understanding of terms. It is a step in the right direction towards eliminating the ambiguity of domain assumptions.

Practical implications

Practically, the study can assist developing nations in constructing strategies that addresses the key factors that need to be apparent in lieu to cultivating its envisaged national culture of cyber security. Additionally, the GMA will contribute to the development of solutions or means that do not overlook interrelations of such factors.

Originality/value

Delineating and defining the cyber security culture domain more precisely could greatly contribute to realizing the elements that collectively play a role in cultivating such a culture for a national perspective.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

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Book part

Roni Reiter-Palmon, Anne E. Herman and Francis J. Yammarino

This chapter provides an in-depth understanding of the cognitive processes that facilitate creativity from a multi-level perspective. Because cognitive processes are…

Abstract

This chapter provides an in-depth understanding of the cognitive processes that facilitate creativity from a multi-level perspective. Because cognitive processes are viewed as residing within the individual and as an individual-level phenomenon, it is not surprising that a plethora of research has focused on various cognitive processes involved in creative production at the individual level and the factors that may facilitate or hinder the successful application of these processes. Of course, individuals do not exist in a vacuum, and many organizations are utilizing teams and groups to facilitate creative problem solving. We therefore extend our knowledge from the individual to the team level and group level, providing more than 50 propositions for testing and discussing their implications for future research.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Creativity and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-553-6

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Article

C.E. Siemieniuch and M.A. Sinclair

The aim of this paper is to introduce the CLEVER process framework for knowledge lifecycle management (KLM), which was developed to help organisations in the manufacturing…

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to introduce the CLEVER process framework for knowledge lifecycle management (KLM), which was developed to help organisations in the manufacturing and construction domains tackle ill‐defined knowledge management problems. Focussing on organisational and cultural issues, rather than technological ones, the framework aids the user organisation to translate vague KLM problems into a set of specific knowledge management issues, to identify preferred solutions for these, and then to identify the appropriate KLM processes to achieve these solutions. In this respect, the paper is an extension of the work of Boisot, and Davenport and Prusak although the origins are different. The paper begins with the background and aims of the project on which this research is based and moves on to a discussion on the importance of knowledge management and its relevance to the CLEVER framework. An overview of the framework, describing its four‐stage structure is provided which details examples of how to apply each of the separate stages. The final section summarises the limits of the tool and proposes new areas where further research is required.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article

Sun-Hwa Kim, Kiwon Lee and Ann Fairhurst

Green practices have been of increasing interest to both practitioners and researchers in the hospitality context. To understand how green practices have been adopted in…

Abstract

Purpose

Green practices have been of increasing interest to both practitioners and researchers in the hospitality context. To understand how green practices have been adopted in the industry, a systematic review of recent hospitality literature is essential. The purpose of this paper is to identify research domains and formulate a definition of green practices that accurately reflects the current hospitality context.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed 146 articles on green practices published between 2000 and 2014 in eight hospitality journals. Using content analysis, multiple researchers coded the articles using a standardized coding scheme.

Findings

The number of articles on green practices in the hospitality context has been growing. Most studies focus on managers and the lodging sector. The authors identify three research domains for green practices in the hospitality literature: organizational, operational and strategic. They define a green practice as a value-added business strategy that benefits hospitality operations that engage in environmental protection initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

This framework may help practitioners develop green practice strategies and governments develop effective green policies and reinforce activities aimed at environmental protection. It provides theoretical foundation for future research related to green practices in the hospitality industry. Overall, hospitality stakeholders can use this framework to understand the implementation and effects of green practices.

Originality/value

The authors create an organizational framework for a fragmented body of literature by identifying three research domains for green practices based on a systematic review of recently published hospitality articles (2000-2014). They challenge existing definitions of green practices and propose an accurate definition tailored to the hospitality context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Rodolfo Baggio

This paper aims to examine the complexity science approach to the tourism domain.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the complexity science approach to the tourism domain.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a personal perspective

Findings

The study is an analysis of past and future applications.

Originality/value

Historical considerations

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Book part

Joan H. Johnston, C. Shawn Burke, Laura A. Milham, William M. Ross and Eduardo Salas

A key challenge for cost-effective Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) is the ability to create generalizable domain, learner, and pedagogical models so they can be…

Abstract

A key challenge for cost-effective Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) is the ability to create generalizable domain, learner, and pedagogical models so they can be re-used many times over. Investment in this technology will be needed to succeed in developing ITSs for team training. The purpose of this chapter is to propose an instructional framework for guiding team ITS researchers in their development of these models for reuse. We establish a foundation for the framework with three propositions. First, we propose that understanding how teams develop is needed to establish a science-based foundation for modeling. Toward this end, we conduct a detailed exploration of the Kozlowski, Watola, Jensen, Kim, and Botero (2009) theory of team development and leadership, and describe a use case example to demonstrate how team training was developed for a specific stage in their model. Next, we propose that understanding measures of learning and performance will inform learner modeling requirements for each stage of team development. We describe measures developed for the use case and how they were used to understand teamwork skill development. We then discuss effective team training strategies and explain how they were implemented in the use case to understand their implications for pedagogical modeling. From this exploration, we describe a generic instructional framework recommending effective training strategies for each stage of team development. To inform the development of reusable models, we recommend selecting different team task domains and varying team size to begin researching commonalities and differences in the instructional framework.

Details

Building Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-474-1

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Article

Md. Aftab Uddin, H.P. Rasika Priyankara and Monowar Mahmood

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of an employee’s personal creative identity on their innovation behaviour in knowledge-intensive information…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of an employee’s personal creative identity on their innovation behaviour in knowledge-intensive information technology (IT) service provider firms. It further investigates the mediating role of an employee’s creative process engagement (CPE) and the moderating effects of the organizational creative climate on creative identity-innovative behaviour (IB) relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows a quantitative method. Using a multi-item survey instrument, a total of 316 questionnaires were collected from the employees of IT service provider firms in Chittagong, Bangladesh. The collected data were analysed using structural equation modelling, factor analysis and path analysis to test the hypotheses and to assess the moderating and mediating effects of the variables.

Findings

The results revealed the significant influence of an employee’s creative personal identity (CPI) on their IB. The mediation analysis revealed that CPE mediates the association between a CPI and IB. The study also found a significant moderating effect of a creative organizational climate between a CPI and CPE.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the premise of the interactionist approach of creativity and role identity theory, this study contributes to the creativity and innovation literature by providing empirical support for the relationship between a personal creative identity, organizational creative culture, CPE and IB in IT service organizations.

Originality/value

This study adopts a distinct model comprising four different variables to investigate an employee’s IB from a multi-level perspective, i.e., a creative identity and CPE at the individual level and a creative climate and IB at the organizational level. This integrated model using predictors from multiple levels supports the theoretical assumption that IB results from the interaction of individual and organizational level factors.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Information Tasks: Toward a User-centered Approach to Information Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-801-8

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Book part

Cynthia T. Matthew and Robert J. Sternberg

This chapter explores the unique role of leadership in organizational innovation. Drawing from the investment theory of creativity (Sternberg & Lubart, 1995), we show that…

Abstract

This chapter explores the unique role of leadership in organizational innovation. Drawing from the investment theory of creativity (Sternberg & Lubart, 1995), we show that organizational innovation begins with a leadership decision. Based on a review of the creativity, organizational, and leadership literatures, the key components of organizational innovation are examined from individual, group, and organization-wide perspectives. Leading innovation is conceptualized as a special case of leading organizational change, which requires creative leadership skills applied to social systems. Establishing an organizational environment that supports innovation in the current market environment increases systemic paradoxes that must be managed by leaders. We conclude that leading innovation increases the creative demand on the leadership system, which requires leaders who have a developed understanding of the process of innovation and its environmental requirements.

Details

Innovation through Collaboration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-331-0

Content available
Article

Ajay Kumar

Aaker’s brand personality scale (BPS) published in 1997 has revived hitherto sluggish interest in brand personality research. With time, the BPS, most cited work in brand…

Abstract

Purpose

Aaker’s brand personality scale (BPS) published in 1997 has revived hitherto sluggish interest in brand personality research. With time, the BPS, most cited work in brand personality, also faced criticism across dimensions. This paper aims to review the popular journals published after 1997 for criticism related to BPS.

Design/methodology/approach

Papers using Aaker’s BPS without change/with change are identified and scrutinized for reasons for the usage of BPS. Papers on brand personality that have avoided BPS are also scrutinized for reasons of avoidance. Independent efforts of understanding brand personality without Aaker’s framework are also reviewed. In-depth study of all these papers is done to report the criticism of Aaker’s BPS.

Findings

This review identifies the criticism of BPS and classifies it across six categories – definition, dimension, methodology, concept, words and generalizability related criticism. This paper argues that some issues such as definition, conceptual understanding of brand personality and methodology used to develop BPS need further attention of scholars. On the other hand, issues of dimensions, words used and generalizability can be attributed to evident reasons, such as culture and meaning given to words because of native language.

Originality/value

This criticism and interest in Aaker’s BPS are unprecedented. It has been 20 years since BPS was published. Many scholars have countered the Aaker’s BPS through their work; however, a comprehensive review covering all criticisms and issues of BPS is still missing in literature. This paper is filling this gap in literature.

Objetivo

La Escala de Personalidad de Marca de Aaker fue publicada en 1997 y desde entonces ha motivado el interés por la investigación de la personalidad de la marca. Con el tiempo, esta escala se ha convertido en la más citada, pero también ha sido objeto de crítica. Este artículo revisa las principales críticas a la escala desde su publicación en 1997.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Se analizaron los artículos que utilizaron la escala de personalidad de marca de Aaker sin cambios o con cambios y los motivos de uso. Se examinaron los trabajos que evitaron utilizar la escala y las razones argumentadas. También se analizaron los esfuerzos realizados para comprender la personalidad de marca al margen de este enfoque. El análisis en profundidad de todos estos trabajos permitió sintetizar las principales críticas vertidas hacia la escala de personalidad de marca de Aaker.

Resultados

Las críticas a la escala de personalidad de marca fueron clasificadas en seis categorías - Definición, Dimensión, Metodología, Concepto, Palabras utilizadas y Capacidad de generalización. El artículo argumenta que algunas cuestiones como la definición, la comprensión conceptual de la personalidad de la marca y la metodología utilizada para desarrollar la escala requieren mayor atención por parte de los académicos. Por otra parte, los problemas relacionados con las dimensiones, las palabras utilizadas y la capacidad de generalización pueden atribuirse a razones evidentes como la cultura, diferente significado de las palabras en distintos países, etc.

Originalidad/valor

Las críticas e interés generado por la escala de personalidad de marca de Aaker no tienen precedentes. Han pasado 20 años desde su publicación y son muchos los investigadores han vertido sus críticas específicas. Sin embargo, en la literatura se echa en falta algún trabajo que revise todas estas críticas de forma integrada. Este artículo pretende cubrir este vacío en la literatura.

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