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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Kirk Chang, Bang Nguyen, Kuo-Tai Cheng, Chien-Chih Kuo and Iling Lee

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between HR practice (four aspects), organisational commitment and citizenship behaviour at primary schools in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between HR practice (four aspects), organisational commitment and citizenship behaviour at primary schools in Taiwan. The four human resource (HR) aspects include: recruitment and placement (RP), teaching, education and career (TEC) development, support, communication and retention (SCR), and performance and appraisal (PA).

Design/methodology/approach

With the assistance from the school HR managers and using an anti-common method variance strategy, research data from 568 incumbent teachers in Taiwan are collected, analysed and evaluated.

Findings

Different from prior studies, highlighting the merits of HR practice, the study discovers that HR practice may not necessarily contribute to citizenship behaviour. Teachers with positive perceptions of RP and TEC are more likely to demonstrate citizenship behaviour, whereas teachers with positive perceptions of SCR and PA are not. In addition, the study finds three moderators: affective organisational commitment (AOC), rank of positions, and campus size. The analysis shows that teachers with more AOC, higher positions and from smaller campus are more likely to demonstrate organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB).

Originality/value

The study provides a closer look at the HR-OCB relationship in Taiwan. It reveals that a positive perception of HR practice may not necessarily contribute to OCB occurrence. In addition, the results indicate that teachers have different views about varying HR aspects. Specifically, aspects of RP and TEC development receive relatively higher levels of positive perception, whereas aspects of SCR and PA receive relatively lower levels of positive perception. Questions arise as to whether HR practice may lead to more OCB at primary schools. If this statement is true, school managers shall think further of how to promote OCB using other policies, rather than relying on the HR practice investigated here.

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Hafeez Idowu Agbabiaka, Abiodun Adebola Omoike and Emmanuel Olufemi Omisore

Festivals in many regions of the world are sources of attraction to tourists. Festivals have become of great significance to many people especially in areas where…

Abstract

Purpose

Festivals in many regions of the world are sources of attraction to tourists. Festivals have become of great significance to many people especially in areas where tradition, norms and values of the society are still being upheld of which Yoruba land in Nigeria is not an exception. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to examine the patronage and factors influencing patronage of Olojo and Ojude Oba festival, in Southwestern Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Purposive sampling technique was used to select Ojude Oba and Olojo festivals based on popularity among other identified festivals in the study areas. Convenience sampling technique was employed to select 210 and 114 Patrons from Ojude Oba and Olojo festivals, respectively. Preliminary survey showed that there were 4,294 and 3,124 buildings around the venues of the festivals in Ijebu-Ode and Ile-Ife, respectively. Therefore, systematic sampling technique was employed to select one out of every 40th buildings (2.5 per cent) where a household head will be sampled for questionnaire administration. Consequently, 107 and 78 household heads were sampled, respectively, from Ijebu-ode and Ile-Ife. This gave a total of 324 patrons and 185 residents for the study.

Findings

Findings established that the factors influencing patronage of cultural festival comprises festival anxiety, promotion of community cultural heritage, socio-cultural development, infrastructural development, improved town liveability, ethno-cultural unity, entertainment, income generation and public enlightenment factors accounting for 14.78, 13.20, 10.44, 6.20, 5.68, 5.59, 5.00, 4.93 and 4.88 per cent variations of the total factors that influenced patronage of Olojo and Ojude Oba festival.

Originality/value

The implication of the findings is that patrons attended the festival and events for leisure purpose, whereas the aspiration, promotion of community cultural heritage, socio-cultural development, infrastructural development, improved town liveability, ethno-cultural unity, entertainment, income generation and public enlightenment are the underlining factors of motivation to purchase and repurchase the festival.

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International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Antonio Memmolo, Matteo Bernardini and Sergio Pirozzoli

This paper aims to show results of numerical simulations of transonic flow around a supercritical airfoil at chord Reynolds number Rec = 3 × 106, with the aim of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show results of numerical simulations of transonic flow around a supercritical airfoil at chord Reynolds number Rec = 3 × 106, with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms responsible for large-scale shock oscillations, namely, transonic buffet.

Design/methodology/approach

Unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes simulations and detached-eddy simulations provide a preliminary buffet map, while a high fidelity implicit large-eddy simulation with an upstream laminar boundary layer is used to ascertain the physical feasibility of the various buffet mechanisms. Numerical experiments with unsteady RANS highlight the role of waves travelling on pressure side in the buffet mechanism. Estimates of the propagation velocities of coherent disturbances and of acoustic waves are obtained, to check the validity of popular mechanisms based on acoustic feedback from the trailing edge.

Findings

Unsteady RANS numerical experiments demonstrate that the pressure side of the airfoil plays a marginal role in the buffet mechanism. Implicit LES data show that the only plausible self-sustaining mechanism involves waves scattered from the trailing edge and penetrating the sonic region from above the suction side shock. An interesting side result of this study is that buffet appears to be more intense in the case that the boundary layer state upstream of the shock is turbulent, rather than laminar.

Originality/value

The results of the study will be of interest to any researcher involved with transonic buffet.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

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Book part
Publication date: 24 January 2022

Münevvere Yıldız and Letife Özdemir

Purpose: Investors and portfolio managers can earn profitably when they correctly predict when stock prices will go up or down. For this reason, it is crucial to know the…

Abstract

Purpose: Investors and portfolio managers can earn profitably when they correctly predict when stock prices will go up or down. For this reason, it is crucial to know the effect levels of the factors that affect stock prices. In addition to macroeconomic factors, the psychological behavior of investors also affects stock prices. Therefore, the study aims to reveal the different sensitivity levels of the stock index against macroeconomic and psychological factors.

Design/Methodology/Approach: In this study, dollar rate (USD), euro rate (EURO), time deposit interest rate (IR), gold price (GOLD), industrial production index (IPI), and consumer price index (CPI) (inflation (INF)) were used as macroeconomic factors, while Consumer Confidence Index (CCI) and VIX Fear Index (VIX) were used as psychological factors. In addition, the BIST-100 index, which is listed in Borsa Istanbul, was used as the stock index. The sensitivity of the stock index to macroeconomic and psychological factors was investigated using the Multivariate Adaptive Regression Spline (MARS) method using data from January 2012 to October 2020.

Findings: In the analyses performed using the MARS method, the coefficients of INF, USD, EURO, IR, CCI, and VIX Index were found to be statistically significant and effective on the stock index. Among these variables, INF has the highest effect on stocks. It is followed by USD, IR, EURO, CCI, and VIX. GOLD and IPI variables did not show statistical significance in the model. The most important difference of the MARS model from other regressions is that each factor’s effect on the stock index is analyzed by separating it according to the value of the factor. According to the results obtained from the MARS model: (1) it has been determined that USD, EURO, IR, and CPI have both positive and negative effects on the stock market index and (2) CCI and VIX have been found to have negative effects on stocks. These results provide essential information about how investors who plan to invest in the stock index should take into consideration different macroeconomic and psychological values.

Originality/value: This study contributes to the literature as it is one of the first studies to examine the effects of factors affecting the stock index by decomposing it according to the values it takes. Also, this study provides additional information by listing the factors affecting the stock index in order of importance. These results will help investors, portfolio managers, company executives, and policy-makers understand the stock markets.

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Insurance and Risk Management for Disruptions in Social, Economic and Environmental Systems: Decision and Control Allocations within New Domains of Risk
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-140-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1972

Par Georges CAZES

Pour bon nombre de pays d'économie attardée, mais favorisés par des conditions climatiques attrayantes, le tourisme apparaît de plus en plus comme une des chances…

Abstract

Pour bon nombre de pays d'économie attardée, mais favorisés par des conditions climatiques attrayantes, le tourisme apparaît de plus en plus comme une des chances décisives et un des principaux facteurs de la croissance nécessaire. Quelques réussites récentes, au moins sur le plan statistique, sont fort spectaculaires et la floraison simultanée, en de nombreux points du globe, d'ambitieux programmes touristiques ne manque pas d'impressionner. Pourtant, le jugement porté sur les effets économiques d'un tel choix demeure à la fois plus prudent et plus nuancé. La question essentielle peut ainsi être posée: les économies en voie de développement sont‐elles capables de retenir et d'utiliser sur place les revenus, parfois considérables, distribués par les touristes étrangers? Et ces revenus sont‐ils susceptibles de jouer un rôle décisif dans le «décollage» économique, en soutenant les objectifs nationaux essentiels, en ne détournant pas le pays des priorités et des contraintes de la croissance?

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Nico Binsfeld, Jason Whalley and Lee Pugalis

Over the past decade or so, successive Luxembourgish governments have sought to develop the country’s information and communication technologies (ICT) sector. In this…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past decade or so, successive Luxembourgish governments have sought to develop the country’s information and communication technologies (ICT) sector. In this paper, the authors will aim to examine how Luxembourg’s relative position in the “Networked Readiness Index” (NRI), a key international benchmarking exercise published by the World Economic Forum, has evolved over time as these ambitions have been achieved. The paper also explores what policy initiatives could be implemented to further improve Luxembourg’s ranking in the NRI.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal case study-based approach, drawing on secondary data and the annual publication of the NRI between 2003 and 2016, was adopted.

Findings

Luxembourg’s position in the NRI has improved from 27th in 2003, so that it now ranks among the top ten countries in the world. In particular, Luxembourg has substantially improved its position with regards to “infrastructure” and “international connectivity”. However, there are also areas, mainly linked to education, the provision of human resources and policies that allow for and stimulate entrepreneurship where further improvements appear possible.

Social implications

The paper highlights the need for an overall, holistic, ICT development strategy. Such a strategy would cover not only cover infrastructural and technical aspects but also educational, social, regulatory and economic issues as well.

Originality/value

The paper charts the evolution over time of Luxembourg’s position in an important international ICT index and identifies its current strengths and weaknesses in terms of the different elements that constitute the NRI. This paper represents the first attempt to investigate the position of a small country, which are often overlooked in the literature, in terms of its changing position and the policies developed and enacted by a national government.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Daniel Vloeberghs and Liselore Berghman

Argues that for competence management to be a valuable tool in leveraging individual competencies to dynamic organisational core competencies, more stress should be laid…

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2317

Abstract

Argues that for competence management to be a valuable tool in leveraging individual competencies to dynamic organisational core competencies, more stress should be laid on competence development. More specifically, focuses on the effectiveness of development centres (DC), in terms of personal development and pursuit of the development plan. In this way, attempts to meet the need for more studies on the whole DC process and, more specifically, on its effectiveness. Furthermore, looks to take a first step in integrating fields of coaching, self‐development and line management human resources involvement in DC studies.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

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28756

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

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Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Sharath Baburaj and Manish Kumar

The study examined the impact of two dimensions of curiosity: joyous exploration (JE) and deprivation sensitivity (DSv) on informal learning effort (ILE) and attitude…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examined the impact of two dimensions of curiosity: joyous exploration (JE) and deprivation sensitivity (DSv) on informal learning effort (ILE) and attitude toward knowledge sharing (ATKS). The authors further explored the mediating effect of learning culture (LC) in the organization on the relationship of the two curiosity dimensions with ILE and ATKS. Additionally, the authors investigated the moderating effect of group dynamics in the form of intragroup task conflict (ITC) and relationship conflict (IRC) on the relationship of curiosity variables with LC, ILE and ATKS.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey instrument was distributed to 790 knowledge workers in various organizations through their HR managers. 403 responses were returned and used in the study.

Findings

JE, the self-determined manifestation of curiosity, impacts all elements of ILE and ATKS, while DSv influences a few aspects of ILE. The effect of JE on the dependent variables is, however, more substantial at low levels of ITC. ITC and IRC independently impact ILE, but only ITC moderates the relationships involving JE (but not DSv). LC emerges from JE (but not from DSv) and partially mediates its association with ILE and ATKS.

Originality/value

Through this work, we demonstrate the differential relevance of the curiosity dimensions and the intragroup conflict types – and their interaction effect – on learning effort and attitude toward knowledge sharing. The findings of the study open new avenues for interventions within the workplace learning and knowledge sharing domain.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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