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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2022

Walter Leal Filho, Linda Ternova, Muhammad Muddassir Fayyaz, Ismaila Rimi Abubakar, Marina Kovaleva, Felix Kwabena Donkor, Samuel Weniga Anuga, Abraham R. Matamanda, Ilija Djekic, Ibrahim Abatcha Umar, Felicia Motunrayo Olooto, Maria Meirelles, Gustavo J. Nagy, Julia May, Marta May, Eromose Ebhuoma and Halima Begum

The interconnections between climate change and health are well studied. However, there is a perceived need for studies that examine how responses to health hazards (e.g…

Abstract

Purpose

The interconnections between climate change and health are well studied. However, there is a perceived need for studies that examine how responses to health hazards (e.g. cardiovascular diseases, ozone layer effects, allergens, mental health and vector-borne diseases) may assist in reducing their impacts. The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence on health responses to climate hazards and list some measures to address them.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed literature review, bibliometric analysis and an original online survey were undertaken on 140 participants from 55 countries spread across all geographical regions.

Findings

The bibliometric analysis identified that most climate-related health hazards are associated with extreme weather events. However, only one-third of the investigated papers specifically analysed the connections between climate change and health hazards, revealing a thematic gap. Also, although Africa is highly affected by climate change, only 5% of the assessed studies focused on this continent. Many respondents to the survey indicated “heat distress” as a significant vulnerability. The survey also identified social determinants relevant to climate-induced health vulnerabilities, such as socioeconomic and environmental factors, infrastructure and pre-existing health conditions. Most respondents agree that policies and regulations are the most effective adaptation tools to address the public health hazards triggered by climate change. This paper presents some suggestions for optimising public health responses to health hazards associated with climate change, such as the inclusion of climate-related components in public health policies, setting up monitoring systems to assess the extent to which specific climate events may pose a health threat, establishing plans to cope with the health implications of heatwaves, increased measures to protect vulnerable groups and education and awareness-raising initiatives to reduce the overall vulnerability of the population to climate-related health hazards. These measures may assist the ongoing global efforts to understand better – and cope with – the impacts of climate change on health.

Originality/value

The combination of a literature review, bibliometric analysis and an original world survey identified and presented a wide range of responses.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 December 2021

Marija Mitrovic, Igor Tomasevic and Ilija Djekic

This research shows how the perception of quality differs through the table egg chain and highlights the main quality characteristics for each studied chain participant…

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Abstract

Purpose:

This research shows how the perception of quality differs through the table egg chain and highlights the main quality characteristics for each studied chain participant (farm, retail, consumer).

Design/methodology/approach:

Observing the change in perception starts from the farm, through retail to the end consumer using the customer–supplier interaction, while looking back from the consumer to the farm, the application of the quality function deployment (QFD) was used. The study included 30 farms, 50 retail stores, 1,000 customers and 300 households.

Findings:

The farm–retail comparison highlights the type of production as the dominant factor affecting egg quality for both of these participants, followed by hen diet and the type of laying hen hybrid from the farmer's point of view, while retail focuses on packaging and egg damage. Egg quality aspects from the retail–household perspective emphasize the shell appearance and the origin of the eggs, while shelf life and egg class are equally important characteristics for both participants. The application of the QFD throughout the entire egg chain emphasizes quality vs price as the most important characteristic.

Originality/value:

This study could serve to food policy makers as an introduction to further research and production orientation in relation to the set of quality requirements associated with the egg supply chain.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Ilija Djekic, Nikola Tomic, Nada Smigic, Bozidar Udovicki, Gerard Hofland and Andreja Rajkovic

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the hygienic design of a scalable unit for supercritical carbon dioxide drying of food.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the hygienic design of a scalable unit for supercritical carbon dioxide drying of food.

Design/methodology/approach

For the purpose of this study, a checklist has been developed, covering requirements from sanitary standards and industry-tailored guidelines. Beyond hygienic design, failure mode and effects analysis of the results were performed to assess the potential food safety risks that may arise from failures to hygienic design requirements.

Findings

The overall score of the hygienic design was 46 percent. This kind of evaluation revealed two types of nonconformities. The first type was related to inadequate sanitary procedures. The second type was associated to design failures.

Research limitations/implications

The highest risk was designated to problems related to cleaning and sanitation followed by risks associated with the formation of dead zones and biofilms.

Practical implications

This study provides valuable insight to engineers and food technologists on hygienic design issues.

Originality/value

Application of a similar methodology was used for evaluating hygienic design of other non-thermal food technologies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2018

Jovana Vunduk, Ilija Djekic, Predrag Petrović, Igor Tomašević, Maja Kozarski, Saša Despotović, Miomir Nikšić and Anita Klaus

The purpose of this paper is to examine compositional differences between brown and white varieties of Agaricus bisporus during shelf life and to determine if the growing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine compositional differences between brown and white varieties of Agaricus bisporus during shelf life and to determine if the growing demand for the brown variety is scientifically justified.

Design/methodology/approach

Field research enabled analyzing consumers’ perceptions on intrinsic, extrinsic and quality characteristics of mushrooms. A total of 275 consumers participated in the survey. Obtained results were used for comparing white and brown varieties of A. bisporus over a period of 22 days. Mushrooms were packed in air and in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) at 4°C. Samples were analyzed for their nutritional, antioxidative and microbiological characteristics.

Findings

Two weeks from harvest, white variety showed higher amount of essential nutrients, while during the third week, brown mushrooms were more nutritionally valuable. Brown variety had better antioxidative ability for all 22 days of storage. Aerobic plate count (APC) was as expected for the mushrooms. MAPs significantly lowered APC in both varieties. The number of Enterobacteriaceae was equal for both varieties at the beginning, but later on they developed much faster in the case of brown variety. Field research combined with specific analyses clarified that there are no nutritive or microbiological reasons for the precedence of brown variety over white.

Research limitations/implications

Sensory aspect of the quality of mushrooms was not analyzed.

Originality/value

Market trend toward brown variety was scientifically challenged.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Ilija Djekic, Jelena Kuzmanovic, Aleksandra Andjelkovic, Miroslava Saracevic, Marija M. Stojanovic and Igor Tomasevic

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the microbial profile of food contact surfaces (FCS) in foodservice industry of Serbia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the microbial profile of food contact surfaces (FCS) in foodservice industry of Serbia.

Design/methodology/approach

The research covered 21,485 samples collected from 1,085 foodservice establishments during a period of 43 months. Results were deployed in terms of food contact materials, types of FCS and types of foodservice establishments.

Findings

Highest share of results=2 log10 CFU/cm2 were present on plastic surfaces during Autumn, while on ceramic and stainless steel surfaces highest share were observed during the Summer season. Take-away food establishments had the highest share of results=2 log10 CFU/cm2 for both stainless steel and plastic surfaces. Highest share of stainless steel surfaces with microbial load=2 log10 CFU/cm2 were cutlery, dishes and knives. Plastic dishes had the highest share of results=2 log10 CFU/cm2 while cutting boards had the majority of results between 1 log10 CFU/cm2 and 2 log10 CFU/cm2.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the research stem from the discussion of the nature of the FCS like porosity and other physical characteristics.

Practical implications

This research has a practical application in terms of establishing process hygiene levels depending on types of food contact materials and types of FCS and seasonal variations.

Originality/value

The findings of this study are worthy, in respect to possible correlation between seasonal variation and process hygiene requirements and can facilitate a better understanding of microbial risks associated with food preparation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Ilija Djekic, Dubravka Skunca, Ivan Nastasijevic, Vladimir Tomovic and Igor Tomasevic

The purpose of this paper is to analyze perceptions of quality in the chicken meat supply chain.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze perceptions of quality in the chicken meat supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This survey covered 74 different farms, slaughterhouses, meat processors, and retailers and 500 consumers, using two methods. From the farm to retail, analysis covered “customer – supplier” viewpoints in different stages of the supply chain. From the consumers to the farms, the quality function deployment method was used. Five houses of quality have been developed using the Delphi method to synthesize the opinions of experts.

Findings

Farm-slaughter comparison shows that final weight at farm gate and animal welfare are the most important quality attributes. The quality aspect important for slaughterhouses and meat processors is the cold chain. Retailers and meat processors highlight the portfolio of various chicken meat products as their most important quality attribute. At the points of sale, shelf illumination and product placement are prevailing.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that there are different views on quality by all actors in the supply chain, from quality of chicken meat, food safety and quality of service in retail to profitability and animal welfare.

Practical implications

The paper enhances simplicity in analyzing quality aspects of different types of meat supply chains. This methodology enables a synergy of value chain promotion with other quality development approaches. It also creates possibilities for policy makers to improve competitiveness strategies.

Originality/value

Application of a similar approach to other parts of the food chain could offer a better insight into the transformation of quality.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Nada Smigic, Ilija Djekic, Nikola Tomic, Bozidar Udovicki and Andreja Rajkovic

Supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) is a promising novel treatment that might be used in the food industry, such as sc-CO2 pasteurisation and sc-CO2 drying. Before sc-CO2

Abstract

Purpose

Supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) is a promising novel treatment that might be used in the food industry, such as sc-CO2 pasteurisation and sc-CO2 drying. Before sc-CO2 treated foodstuffs may be introduced to European market, they have to be authorised according to novel food regulation. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to give an overview of available literature data on sc-CO2 treated fruits and vegetables, which might be used for novel food authorisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on literature data available via Science Direct, EBSCO and Wiley concerning sc-CO2 pasteurisation and drying of fruits/vegetables. Studies performed on animal foodstuffs were manually excluded, while articles related to novel foods and legislation were included in the study.

Findings

Database search resulted 34 articles related to microbiological and compositional/nutritional changes in sc-CO2 treated foods. Obtained data indicated that sc-CO2 pasteurisation is effective in inactivating microorganisms in liquids, while no general conclusion on the microbiological quality of sc-CO2 pasteurised solid foods or sc-CO2 dried foods could be made. Available literature data showed that sc-CO2 pasteurisation did not result in significant compositional/nutritional changes in liquids, while for sc-CO2 pasteurised solid foods or sc-CO2 dried foods, one is not able to make common conclusions due to insufficient research data. Therefore, additional research and case-by-case study for each treated food have to be prepared.

Originality/value

This study is original to the extent that it brought together available information on sc-CO2 pasteurised and dried foods, needed the novel food application.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Nada Smigic, Tijana Lazarov and Ilija Djekic

The purpose of this study was to evaluate food handling practices and food safety knowledge among undergraduate students in the Republic of Serbia. It was also to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to evaluate food handling practices and food safety knowledge among undergraduate students in the Republic of Serbia. It was also to determine whether the university curriculum influences the food safety outcome among participating students.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured, self-administrative questionnaire was designed and used to assess the level of food handling practices and food safety knowledge among undergraduate students in the Republic of Serbia. In total, 240 students were involved in this study. For each participating student, the food handling practice score (FHPS) and food safety knowledge score (FSKS) was calculated by dividing the sum of correct answers by the total number of correct responses. Additionally, knowledge gaps among students of food/health related and non-food/health related faculties were identified.

Findings

The average FHPS for all students was 46%, while the average FSKS was 56%. Both FHPS and FSKS scores were significantly associated with the education, and students of food/health related faculties (Food Technology, Veterinary Medicine and Medicine) obtained better scores compared to students of non-food/health related faculties (Faculty of Agriculture, Economics and Faculty of Philology). Only 12.5% of all students and only 3.3% of non-food/health related students knew that food contaminated with food poisoning bacteria cannot be recognized by visual, olfactory or taste checks. The results indicated that 95% of students apply good practice of hand hygiene before preparing food, while only 52.5% of all students declared that they wash their hands for at least 20 s.

Originality/value

This is the first research aimed to investigate the food handling practices and food safety knowledge among undergraduate students in this part of Europe. Identifying knowledge gaps can help identifying at-risk populations and knowledge-based interventions. Also, novelty of this research was the connection between students' knowledge and curriculum of different food/health related faculties.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Ilija Djekic, Kevin Kane, Nikola Tomic, Eleni Kalogianni, Ada Rocha, Lamprini Zamioudi and Rita Pacheco

This paper aims to present results from a research that analyzed consumer perceptions of service quality in restaurants in four European cities – Belgrade (Serbia)…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present results from a research that analyzed consumer perceptions of service quality in restaurants in four European cities – Belgrade (Serbia), Manchester (UK), Thessaloniki (Greece) and Porto (Portugal).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 802 respondents have been interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The service quality statements covered food quality, building exterior, restaurant interior and layout, seating comfort, restrooms and servicing.

Findings

Within all analyzed categories (city, gender and age), servicing of food and taste of food were the most influential factors. However, this study confirmed that there are different patterns in analyzed cities. For each factor analyzed, in at least two cities, results for the items were significantly different. Consumers from different cities showed different perceptions regarding service quality in restaurants. Gender of consumers plays a significant role in the perception of interior, restroom and servicing factors in restaurants. Age of respondents was the category with no significant difference with respect to food quality, layout, restrooms and servicing.

Research limitations/implications

Given the great cultural and other differences within the four cities/countries, more research is necessary to determine if similar results would be derived from different samples across various other continental and Mediterranean European cities.

Originality/value

In addition to increasing the theoretical understanding of the cultural aspects of the service quality, this paper can be of managerial relevance.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Nada Smigic, Ilija Djekic, Igor Tomasevic, Nikola Stanisic, Aleksandar Nedeljkovic, Verica Lukovic and Jelena Miocinovic

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if there is a difference in hygiene parameters of raw milk produced in organic and conventional farm of similar size. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if there is a difference in hygiene parameters of raw milk produced in organic and conventional farm of similar size. In parallel, the aim was to determine if there are differences in pasteurized organic and conventional milk samples delivered on the market.

Design/methodology/approach

Raw milk samples were analyzed for aerobic colony count (ACC), somatic cell count (SCC), acidity, temperature, fat and protein content. On the other side, final products of organic and conventional pasteurized milk with 2.8 percent declared milk fat were analyzed for Raman spectroscopy, color change and sensorial difference.

Findings

Results of raw milk analysis showed statistically significant differences in fat content, SCC, acidity, temperature and ACC (p<0.05). It is of note that ACC for organic milk were lower for approx. 1 log CFU/ml compared to conventional milk samples. Pasteurized organic milk samples had a significantly higher L* value than those samples originating from conventional farms, indicating that organic is “more white” compared to conventional milk. According to the results of triangle test, with 95 percent confidence no more than 10 percent of the population is able to detect a difference.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this research is the fact that good veterinary practices at farms, namely, animal health and adequate usage of medicine for treating the animals, animal welfare and animal feeding were not analyzed.

Originality/value

This study analyzed potential differences in organic and conventional milk at two important production stages of the milk chain – at receipt at dairy plant (raw milk) and perceived by consumers (final product).

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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