Search results

1 – 10 of 11

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Transport Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045376-7

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Transport Survey Quality and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044096-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Amir Hetsroni and Ilan Asya

The study compared values represented in infomercials with values represented in conventional commercials. A total of 318 infomercials and 861 commercials broadcast in…

Abstract

The study compared values represented in infomercials with values represented in conventional commercials. A total of 318 infomercials and 861 commercials broadcast in Israel in the late 1990s were coded to examine the prominence of value systems and of specific values. Of the three value systems examined – functionalism, hedonism and altruism – functionalism was over three times more frequent in infomercials than in commercials, and altruism was over three times more frequent in commercials than in infomercials. The frequency of hedonism in commercials was 25 percent greater than it was in infomercials. Joy, the most prominent value in commercials, ranked only third in infomercials. Overall, the results show that in spite of the fact that the infomercials are longer than the commercials, they present a more limited selection of values. Infomercials repeatedly mention only the product’s price, its basic qualities and its obvious uses.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Chansoo Park, Ilan Vertinsky and Chol Lee

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a theoretical model to examine how exchange climate attributes and contextual factors between two parent firms in an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a theoretical model to examine how exchange climate attributes and contextual factors between two parent firms in an international joint venture (IJV) affect tacit knowledge transfer. The authors investigate how this tacit knowledge, which comprises international marketing expertise, knowledge about foreign cultures and tastes and managerial practices, impacts IJV performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on data from a survey of IJV managers in 326 Korean firms from a variety of industries, structural equation modeling (AMOS 18.0) is used to test the authors’ hypotheses.

Findings

The findings show that conflict resolution and cooperation positively affect tacit knowledge transfer, but communication does not. It was found that the difference in the relative levels of economic development in the environments of partners significantly influences tacit knowledge acquisition, but cultural distance does not. Tacit knowledge acquisition positively influences IJV performance.

Originality/value

The paper fills a gap in the literature by articulating the relationships between exchange climate attributes and tacit knowledge acquisition. Exchange climate, characterized by behavioral processes that directly impact knowledge transfer, constitutes an important missing link in prior research about tacit knowledge transfer. The paper contributes to a better understanding of the dynamic relationships among relational capital, exchange climate and tacit knowledge transfers. The model the authors develop and test has important implications for the design of organizational processes that facilitate tacit knowledge transfer.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Meni Koslowsky, Asher Aizer and Moshe Krausz

The past few years have seen an increase in studies on the effects of commuting stress on various measures of strain. In particular, commuting impedance, a combination of…

Abstract

The past few years have seen an increase in studies on the effects of commuting stress on various measures of strain. In particular, commuting impedance, a combination of time and distance between home and work, has been suggested as the independent variable that best describes the commuting experience. As demographic characteristics have been hypothesized as affecting strain, data were collected on personal variables and mode of transportation. Presents results from subjects in the present study consisting of 200 employees of a service organization near Tel Aviv, Israel. Whereas results verified the impact of commuting impedance on strain measures related to the commuting experience, the association between personal variables and strain was found to be inconsistent. Although the subjects were drawn from one organization only, they manifested many of the commuting patterns observed in other western nations. Proposes several suggestions for investigating the relationship among commuting stress and strain variables in future studies.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Marc Fetscherin, Ilan Alon, James P. Johnson and Rajesh K. Pillania

The purpose of this paper is to measure and analyze industry export competitiveness of India and it tries to achieve this by presenting a multi‐dimensional framework for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure and analyze industry export competitiveness of India and it tries to achieve this by presenting a multi‐dimensional framework for measuring and illustrating industry export competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework considers industry specialization, industry export growth rate, and relative export market share for a dataset of 97 different Indian industries over a five year period (2001‐2005).

Findings

The analyses identifies four different types of industry groups, namely domestic static, domestic dynamic, global dynamic and global static. The result shows that the majority of Indian industries are dynamic and growing faster than the world export growth rate for the period of study. A total of 40 percent of India's industries are more global, in terms of industry specialization, compared to the world average, with such highly specialized industries as silk, gums, carpets and textiles, floor coverings, pearls, precious stones and metals. The authors show that industry specialization leads to dominance in worldwide export market share. India's global dynamic industries are mainly in the raw materials, commodities and skilled manual labor rather than high tech or manufacturing sectors.

Research limitations/implications

The framework allows us to measure and illustrate industry export competitiveness and permits an intra‐country comparison, a comparison of various industries of one country, or permits an inter‐country comparison, a comparison of one industry across different countries.

Practical implications

The framework should help policymakers, government officials, industry associations, and company executives to assess their export competitiveness and focus on protecting or promoting certain industries by directing scarce resources to sectors where they may count the most. The findings of the study can also be useful for international bodies such as UNCTAD and world‐bank in identifying regional industry that can foster growth of trade and economies in the South‐Asian region.

Originality/value

The framework used is conceptually innovative and applicable to a variety of contexts for modeling industry export competitiveness. The framework also facilitates inter‐ and intra‐country export benchmark analyses.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Amalya L. Oliver and Noam Frank

Israel, characterized by various knowledge-intensive entrepreneurial firms, provides an interesting case study for examining sector-based differences and “small country”…

Abstract

Israel, characterized by various knowledge-intensive entrepreneurial firms, provides an interesting case study for examining sector-based differences and “small country” regional patterns. This chapter has a dual goal of exploring sector and regional differences of knowledge-intensive firms in Israel. The first goal is to depict similarities and differences between firms in three knowledge-intensive sectors: Life Sciences, information technology, and Cleantech. The second goal questions whether the geographical distribution of these firms across regions is associated with different levels of knowledge concentration and organizational homogeneity. Regional and sector-based differences were measured by firm-level network structures, funding patterns, and innovation proxies. One way analysis of variance tests were conducted for attaining these research goals. The main findings show that while most regions exhibit similar patterns of firm and network characteristics, many differences exist on the sector level that are associated with sector-specific attributes. These findings support the notion of a “small country inter-regional homogeneity effect.”

Details

Understanding the Relationship Between Networks and Technology, Creativity and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-489-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Menachem Abudy and Simon Benninga

This paper aims to derive firm value implications for various kinds of employee stock options (ESOs) in a framework that considers uncertainty, non‐diversification and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to derive firm value implications for various kinds of employee stock options (ESOs) in a framework that considers uncertainty, non‐diversification and the US statutory tax treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors extend the analysis of ESOs from the case of perfect capital markets to two cases of imperfect capital markets using the Benninga‐Helmantel‐Sarig framework.

Findings

It is found that ESOs are inferior to cash compensation and that the degree of option inferiority depends on employee diversification. In addition, incentive stock options (ISOs) are generally inferior to non‐qualified stock options (NSOs). This relative profitability of the NSO versus ISO increases as market imperfections are added. The authors also find that in general firm hedging of ESOs is suboptimal.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the firm value of employee stock options.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Hayim Granot

Between 18 January and 28 February 1991, Iraq fired 39 Scud missiles atIsraeli cities in 19 separate attacks. They caused extensive propertydamage but fewer casualties…

Abstract

Between 18 January and 28 February 1991, Iraq fired 39 Scud missiles at Israeli cities in 19 separate attacks. They caused extensive property damage but fewer casualties than anticipated. Statistical evidence of serious psychiatric reactions to the war experience both immediately and after a delay of several months is sought, based on official Ministry of Health morbidity records for psychiatric facilities over the thee‐year period, 1990‐1992. Psychiatric admissions data produced no statistical support for the thesis that the Gulf War and missile attacks caused extensive long‐term stress.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Shira Offer

The literature on personal networks suggests that individuals who have a limited ability to contribute to their network run the risk of being socially excluded and are…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on personal networks suggests that individuals who have a limited ability to contribute to their network run the risk of being socially excluded and are often denied assistance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which poor health and adverse life‐events constitute barriers to support from personal networks among low‐income mothers in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from the Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three City Study (n=1,910), this study estimates a series of ordinary least squares regression and change models to test direct and mediated associations between poor health, adverse life‐events, and perceived support.

Findings

Both the cross‐sectional and longitudinal analyses show that mothers who suffer from psychological distress report lower support than their healthier counterparts, so do mothers with poor physical health. Domestic violence is also found to be negatively associated with support, but its effect is mainly driven by poor health. No effect is revealed for either substance abuse or engagement in illegal activities.

Research limitations/implications

The restricted character of the sample may leave differentials by socioeconomic status unrevealed.

Social implications

The most vulnerable and disadvantaged mothers, those in greatest need for support, are the least likely to have it available from their networks. Hence this study highlights the need of providing support through formal channels in the community.

Originality/value

By treating support as a dependent variable, this study sheds light on the factors related to low‐income mothers' social well‐being and helps reveal the conditions that can impede their participation in support networks.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 32 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 11