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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2009

Il Joon Chung

After the Korean War, South Korean politics was dominated by national security concerns. Reversing Carl von Clausewitz's well-known dictum, in South Korea, “politics is…

Abstract

After the Korean War, South Korean politics was dominated by national security concerns. Reversing Carl von Clausewitz's well-known dictum, in South Korea, “politics is the continuation of war by other means.” Until the late 1980s, politics in South Korea was far from democratic. South Korea had five direct presidential elections (1987, 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007) and six national assembly elections (1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, and 2008) after the democratic transition of 1987. In 1992, a civilian candidate, Young Sam Kim, was elected president. Young Sam Kim (1993–1998) prosecuted and punished former generals turned presidents Doo Hwan Chun (1980–1988) and Tae Woo Roh (1988–1993) for corruption, mutiny and treason in 1995. Dae Jung Kim (1998–2003) was elected president in 1997. For the first time in South Korean political history, regime change occurred between a ruling party and an opposition party.

In this chapter, the change and continuity of civil–military relations through the fluctuating dynamics of the democratic transition and consolidation in South Korea is examined. A positive consolidation of democratic reform is one that, while securing indisputable civilian supremacy, grants the military enough institutional autonomy for the efficient pursuit of its mission. Civilian supremacy should be institutionalized not only by preventing military intervention in civilian politics but also by ensuring civilian control over the formation and implementation of national defense policy.

In sum, despite three terms of civilian presidency, civilian supremacy has not yet fully institutionalized. Although significant changes in civil-military relations did occur after the democratic transition, they were not initiated by elected leaders with the intention of establishing a firm institutional footing for civilian supremacy. South Korea's political leaders have not crafted durable regulations and institutions that will sustain civilian control over the military.

More than six decades, Korea is still divided. The most highly militarized zone in the world lies along the demilitarized zone. How to draw the line prudently between seeking national security and promoting democracy shall be the most delicate task facing all the civilian regimes to come in South Korea. That mission will remain challenging not only for civilian politicians but also for military leaders.

Details

Advances in Military Sociology: Essays in Honor of Charles C. Moskos
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-893-9

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2009

Abstract

Details

Advances in Military Sociology: Essays in Honor of Charles C. Moskos
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-893-9

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2009

Abstract

Details

Advances in Military Sociology: Essays in Honor of Charles C. Moskos
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-891-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2009

Abstract

Details

Advances in Military Sociology: Essays in Honor of Charles C. Moskos
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-893-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2009

Giuseppe Caforio

I first met Charles C. Moskos back in 1983, at the first international conference in which I had the fortune to participate, and, since my history of relations with him…

Abstract

I first met Charles C. Moskos back in 1983, at the first international conference in which I had the fortune to participate, and, since my history of relations with him parallels those of many colleagues and friends who study the military and who, like me, remember him, it seems worthwhile to introduce these studies in his honour with a personal recollection.

Details

Advances in Military Sociology: Essays in Honor of Charles C. Moskos
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-893-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2009

Giuseppe Caforio

I first met Charles C. Moskos back in 1983, at the first international conference in which I had the fortune to participate, and, since my history of relations with him…

Abstract

I first met Charles C. Moskos back in 1983, at the first international conference in which I had the fortune to participate, and, since my history of relations with him parallels those of many colleagues and friends who study the military and who, like me, remember him, it seems worthwhile to introduce these studies in his honour with a personal recollection.

Details

Advances in Military Sociology: Essays in Honor of Charles C. Moskos
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-891-5

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2016

Frederick Betz

Abstract

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Strategic Thinking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-466-9

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Abstract

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Organized Labor and Civil Society for Multiculturalism: A Solidarity Success Story from South Korea
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-388-6

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Jong Heon Kim, Chan Yik Park, Seung Moon Jun, Gregory Parker, Kwang Joon Yoon, Dae Keun Chung, Il Hyun Paik and Jong Rok Kim

The purpose of this paper is to present the procedure and results from instrumented flight test performed on the flapping MAVs being developed by the authors. A test is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the procedure and results from instrumented flight test performed on the flapping MAVs being developed by the authors. A test is performed using a test measurement system to obtain the real characteristics of the flapping vehicles during their flight.

Design/methodology/approach

The test is performed in an indoor flight test facility, equipped with a motion capture system and tracking cameras. Spatial position data are obtained from the vehicles with retro‐reflective tracking markers attached. A quantitative analysis is carried out through the investigation and interpretation of the test data for the flight performance assessment of the vehicles.

Findings

The finding of the analysis addresses that the test enabled the numerical measurement of vehicles' flying performance and shows the present vehicles have combined characteristics of both birds and insects.

Practical implications

The test metrics attempted in the present study are applicable to the test and evaluation of general flapping micro air vehicles. Thus, this testing method will be useful for the development of future micro air vehicle system.

Originality/value

Full‐scale instrumented flight test and measurement of performance parameters of flapping micro air vehicles other than visual observation are unprecedented and expected to present the guideline of systematic test and evaluation of flapping micro air vehicles.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 85 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

John Lie

From 1953 to 1961, the South Korean economy grew slowly; the average per capita GNP growth was a mere percent, amounting to less than $100 in 1961. Few people, therefore…

Abstract

From 1953 to 1961, the South Korean economy grew slowly; the average per capita GNP growth was a mere percent, amounting to less than $100 in 1961. Few people, therefore, look for the sources of later dynamism in this period. As Kyung Cho Chung (1956:225) wrote in the mid‐1950s: “[South Korea] faces grave economic difficulties. The limitations imposed by the Japanese have been succeeded by the division of the country, the general destruction incurred by the Korean War, and the attendant dislocation of the population, which has further disorganized the economy” (see also McCune 1956:191–192). T.R. Fehrenbach (1963:37), in his widely read book on the Korean War, prognosticated: “By themselves, the two halves [of Korea] might possibly build a viable economy by the year 2000, certainly not sooner.”

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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