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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2023

Fabian O. Ugwu, Lawrence E. Ugwu, Fidelis O. Okpata and Ike E. Onyishi

This study investigated whether job resources (i.e. strengths use support, career self-management and person–job [PJ] fit) moderate the relationship between perceived involvement…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated whether job resources (i.e. strengths use support, career self-management and person–job [PJ] fit) moderate the relationship between perceived involvement in a career accident (PICA) and work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a time-lagged design (N = 398; 69% male), and data were collected at two-point of measurements among Nigerian university academics.

Findings

Results of the present study indicated that employees with higher PICA scores reported low work engagement. Strength use support had significant direct positive main effects on employee work engagement and also produced a significant moderation effect between PICA and work engagement. Career self-management (CSM) was positively related to employee work engagement. The moderation effect of CSM on the relationship between PICA and work engagement was also significant. Results of the present study further indicated that P-J fit was related positively to work engagement and also moderated the negative relationship between PICA and work engagement.

Originality/value

Dearth of employment opportunities has led individuals to choose their career by chance, but empirical studies that validate this assertion are lacking. Few available studies on career accident were exclusively conducted in Western European contexts. The current study therefore deepens the understanding of career accident and work engagement in a neglected context such as Nigeria.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 June 2023

Fabian Ugwu, Anthony C. Nwali, Lawrence E. Ugwu, Chiedozie O. Okafor, Keyna C. Ozurumba and Ike E. Onyishi

This study investigated employee cynicism and workplace ostracism as pathways through which perceived organizational politics (POPs) is related to counterproductive work behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated employee cynicism and workplace ostracism as pathways through which perceived organizational politics (POPs) is related to counterproductive work behavior (CWB) targeted at individual coworkers (CWB-I) and the organization (CWB-O).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 794 university employees in Southeastern, Nigeria at three-point of measurements.

Findings

Results of the Structural Equation Modelling showed that POPs positively predicted CWB-I but did not predict CWB-O directly. POPs positively predicted both employee cynicism and workplace ostracism. Employee cynicism did not predict CWB-I and CWB-O, but workplace ostracism positively predicted both CWB-I and CWB-O. Moreover, whilst POPs did not predict both CWB-I and CWB-O through employee cynicism; workplace ostracism partially mediated the relationship between POPs and the two dimensions of CWB.

Originality/value

The relationship between POPs and CWB has been documented in the literature, but whether affect-laden processes (employee cynicism and workplace ostracism) explain this relationship is new. Conducting the study in a context previously neglected extended our understanding of the indirect relationship between POPs and CWB.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2020

Ibeawuchi K. Enwereuzor, Busayo A. Adeyemi and Ike E. Onyishi

Although a great number of studies have established the important role of leadership in workplace safety, it appears researchers are yet to consider the role that trust in leaders…

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Abstract

Purpose

Although a great number of studies have established the important role of leadership in workplace safety, it appears researchers are yet to consider the role that trust in leaders could play between ethical leadership and safety compliance within healthcare. To address that imbalance, this study aims to investigate the relationship between ethical leadership and safety compliance, with trust in the leader as the mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in three time periods from 237 hospital staff nurses (76.8 per cent women and 23.2 per cent men). Ordinary least squares regression-based path analysis using PROCESS for statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) macro was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results showed that ethical leadership was positively related to trust in a leader but was not related to safety compliance. In addition, trust in leader was positively related to safety compliance and also mediated the positive relationship between ethical leadership and safety compliance.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected within healthcare organisations in a few localities in Nigeria, making it difficult to generalise the findings beyond the current sample let alone the entire country or even continent.

Practical implications

The findings imply that ethical leadership may not be directly effective in improving the safety compliance of subordinate nurses unless such a leader first develops a trust-based relationship with the subordinates.

Originality/value

The current study builds on and extends the burgeoning research in the area of leadership and employee outcome by investigating not only the direct relationship between ethical leadership and safety compliance but also incorporating trust in a leader as a mediator of this relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

During the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic lockdowns, stay at home or work from home, many have argued that the westernised non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPI) do not provide remedial in low-income countries like Nigeria, where informal job seekers, street traders, informal labourers and artisans depend mainly on the informal economy. By applying social solidarity (SS) and community-based approach (CBA), the authors evaluate individual acts (trust, altruism and reciprocity) during the lockdown and how these practices evolve from individual approaches to collective actions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study reflects on pragmatism research paradigm that enables researchers to maintain both subjectivity in their reflections and objectivity in data collection and analysis. The authors adopt a qualitative method through purposeful and convenience sampling procedure. Data were analysed thematically to identify elements of SS, individual acts, collective or community actions and perceptions.

Findings

The findings reveal that COVID-19 had a disproportionate impact (lack of food and a fall in daily income) on workers, informal job seekers, informal businesses operators and the poor households. As such, the study developed a reflective model of solidarity exhibited by individual acts and collective acts (practices of resource pooling, information sharing, women empowerment, distribution of palliatives and donations) within trusted circles that helped people cope with the lockdown experiences.

Practical implications

Solidarity represents beliefs, practices of values and norms. The SS exhibited by people through NPI would have implications on planning and monitoring the effectiveness of public health programmes during a pandemic in the future.

Social implications

The findings of citizens and community actions have implications related to the process of building communities – coming together – and solidarity that enhances social development with implications on community health policy agenda during disasters, emergencies and health pandemic.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to analyse the relationship between trust, altruism, reciprocity, SS and CBA during the COVID-19 pandemic. Also, it seems reasonable to clarify the concept of SS given the lack of clarity about the definitions from previous studies.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Fabian O Ugwu, Ike E. Onyishi and Alma Maria Rodríguez-Sánchez

This study aims to investigate the relationship between organizational trust, psychological empowerment, and employee engagement. In addition, the study seeks to test the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between organizational trust, psychological empowerment, and employee engagement. In addition, the study seeks to test the moderating role of psychological empowerment on the relationship between trust and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Hierarchical regression analyses were carried out on a sample of 715 employees from seven commercial banks and four pharmaceutical companies in south-eastern Nigeria who participated in the survey.

Findings

The results showed that organizational trust and psychological empowerment were predictors of work engagement. There was a moderating effect of empowerment on the relationship between trust and engagement.

Research limitations/implications

The findings show that organizational trust and psychological empowerment that predict positive job behaviour in Western cultures are also critical in understanding Nigerian workers ' positive organizational behaviour such as work engagement.

Practical implications

For practical purposes, the results suggest that organizational trust may be a significant component of organizational interventions. Given that psychological empowerment is strongly related to work engagement, empowerment intervention programs is therefore important in building employees that would be engaged in their work.

Originality/value

This study was one of the first attempts to empirically investigate the direct relationship among organizational trust, psychological empowerment and employee work engagement. Additionally, most previous studies on engagement have been conducted in developed economies of North America and Europe. This study was carried out in a Nigerian business environment where organizational behaviours have been scarcely investigated and comparing these findings with earlier studies may help further clarify the emerging work engagement concept.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Ike E. Onyishi, Ibeawuchi K. Enwereuzor, Afam N. Ituma and J. Tochukwu Omenma

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of perceived employability in the relationship between core self-evaluations (CSEs) and job search behaviour…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of perceived employability in the relationship between core self-evaluations (CSEs) and job search behaviour (preparatory and active job search).

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey data were obtained among a sample of 254 employed and unemployed graduate students from a university in Southeast Nigeria.

Findings

Results of the hierarchical multiple regression show that CSEs was significantly and positively associated with only preparatory job search behaviour but not active job search behaviour. CSEs was positively associated with perceived employability. Perceived employability was positively associated with the preparatory job search but not active job search. Perceived employability also mediated the relationship between CSEs and preparatory job search but failed to mediate the relationship between CSEs and active job search.

Research limitations/implications

The study makes important contribution to the literature on job search by augmenting our understanding on the mechanism that govern core self-evaluation and job search behaviour relationship.

Practical implications

Human resources practitioners can use the insights of the present study in understanding aspects of jobseekers’ personality and perception that may be relevant in job search behaviour. The study has also implications for career development practice especially in the areas of counselling of job seekers in environments where there is high level of unemployment.

Originality/value

There has been rarely any previous attempt at investigating the possibility that the relationship between CSEs and job search behaviour is mediated by perceived employability.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 March 2021

Fabian Onyekachi Ugwu, Ernest Ike Onyishi, Okechukwu O. Anozie and Lawrence Ejike Ugwu

In this paper, the impact of customer incivility on work engagement was investigated. The authors also explored whether supervisor positive gossip and workplace friendship…

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Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the impact of customer incivility on work engagement was investigated. The authors also explored whether supervisor positive gossip and workplace friendship prevalence moderated the impact of customer incivility on work engagement in the Nigerian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a time-lagged design to collect data from 258 frontline casual dining restaurant employees across city centers in South-eastern Nigeria who completed Time 1 and Time 2 paper surveys after a one-month interval.

Findings

Structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed that while customer incivility was negatively lx`inked to work engagement, supervisor positive gossip and workplace friendship prevalence were positively linked to work engagement. It was also found that both supervisor positive gossip and workplace friendship prevalence moderated the negative connection between customer incivility and work engagement.

Practical implications

One proactive way to forestall the negative impact of customer incivility on work engagement is for managers to devise approaches to decrease the impact of uncivil customer behaviors, such as developing an atmosphere that engenders friendship and speaking positively to subordinates about other employees' work behaviors.

Originality/value

Although increased scholarly attention has been paid to workplace incivility, customer incivility has not been sufficiently addressed. Earlier research on workplace gossip is influenced by the widely-held belief that gossip is often negative, with far less attention given to the sunny side of gossip. This study is one of the earliest efforts to examine the moderating roles of supervisor positive gossip and workplace friendship prevalence in the negative link between customer incivility and work engagement in the hospitality industry.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2023

Stewart Selase Hevi, Clemence Dupey Agbenorxevi, Ebenezer Malcalm, Nicholas Mawunyah Mawunyah Gborse, Jeffrey Mawutor Hevi and Vincent Yaw Preko

This paper aims to investigate the moderated-mediation roles of perception of police response to crime and digital interclass coalition against crime between fear of terrorist…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the moderated-mediation roles of perception of police response to crime and digital interclass coalition against crime between fear of terrorist attacks and psychological distress among residents of Tema Metropolis in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A cluster sampling technique was used in the selection of 577 residents who answered questions on fear of terrorism, perception of police response to crime, digital interclass coalition against crime and psychological distress. The study used regression analysis to assess the hypothesized paths.

Findings

The findings show that digital interclass coalition against crime moderates the partially mediated relationship between perception of police response to crime and residents’ psychological distress.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited in scope by the generalization of its findings, as it was restricted to only residents of Tema Metropolis in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first in criminal psychology to explore the relevance of police-public engagement in averting large-scale crime in an emerging economy.

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