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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Igor Budak, Aleksandar Kiralj, Mario Sokac, Zeljko Santosi, Dominic Eggbeer and Sean Peel

Computer-aided design and additive manufacture (CAD/AM) technologies are sufficiently refined and meet the necessary regulatory requirements for routine incorporation into…

Abstract

Purpose

Computer-aided design and additive manufacture (CAD/AM) technologies are sufficiently refined and meet the necessary regulatory requirements for routine incorporation into the medical field, with long-standing application in surgeries of the maxillofacial and craniofacial regions. They have resulted in better medical care for patients and faster, more accurate procedures. Despite ever-growing evidence about the advantages of computer-aided planning, CAD and AM in surgery, detailed reporting on critical design decisions that enable methodological replication and the development and establishment of guidelines to ensure safety are limited. This paper aims to present a novel application of CAD and AM to a single-stage resection and reconstruction of fibrous dysplasia in the zygoma and orbit.

Design/methodology/approach

It is reported in sufficient fidelity to permit methods replication and design guideline developments in future cases, wherever they occur in the world. The collaborative approach included engineers, designers, surgeons and prosthetists to design patient-specific cutting guides and a custom implant. An iterative design process was used, until the desired shape and function were achieved, for both of the devices. The surgery followed the CAD plan precisely and without problems. Immediate post-operative subjective clinical judgements were of an excellent result.

Findings

At 19 months post-op, a CT scan was undertaken to verify the clinical and technical outcomes. Dimensional analysis showed maximum deviation of 4.73 mm from the plan to the result, while CAD-Inspection showed that the deviations ranged between −0.1 and −0.8 mm and that the majority of deviations were located around −0.3 mm.

Originality/value

Improvements are suggested and conclusions drawn regarding the design decisions considered critical to a successful outcome for this type of procedure in the future.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Branko Tadic, Bojan Bogdanovic, Branislav M. Jeremic, Petar M. Todorovic, Ognjan Luzanin, Igor Budak and Djordje Vukelic

– The purpose of this paper is to propose a general model for locating and clamping workpieces of complex geometry with two skewed holes under multiple constraints.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a general model for locating and clamping workpieces of complex geometry with two skewed holes under multiple constraints.

Design/methodology/approach

Numerous constraints related to application of the proposed model are discussed as prerequisite to design of fixture solution. Based on theoretical model, a fixture was designed and successfully tested in experimental investigation. Experimental results were also verified using FEM simulations.

Findings

This study showed that, opposed to conventional approach, novel solution results in significantly smaller fixture dimensions, while providing greater stability. Insertion of mandrels and supports element sub-assemblies into the workpiece holes significantly increases workpiece stiffness through an increased moment of inertia, while the internal support elements largely diminish the problem of thin wall deformation in the workpiece.

Practical implications

The fixture designed in this case was actually used in industrial application to accommodate a thin-walled casting of gearbox housing, where it proved to be a very stable framework. It can be used in industry without any major readjustments.

Originality/value

According to available literature, this work is the first successful implementation of a fixture solution in which the problem of multiple constraints is solved by attaching centering elements, support sub-assemblies, and other fixture elements to the internal workpiece walls, and then locating them in the second part of the fixture.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

Tomaz Brajlih, Bogdan Valentan, Joze Balic and Igor Drstvensek

The purpose of this paper is to establish a general method for achievable speed and accuracy evaluation of additive manufacturing (AM) machines and an objective comparison…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a general method for achievable speed and accuracy evaluation of additive manufacturing (AM) machines and an objective comparison among them.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a general schematic is defined that enables description of all currently available AM machines. This schematic is used to define two influential factors describing certain parts' properties regarding the machines' yield during manufacturing. A test part is defined, that will enable testing the influence of these factors on the speed and accuracy of manufacturing. A method for implementing and adapting test parts is established for individual machine's testing. This method was used to test four different machines that are predominantly used in Slovenia at the moment.

Findings

Research has proven that the machine's yield had a predominant influence on the achievable manufacturing speeds of all the tested machines. In addition, the results have shown different ranges of achievable manufacturing speeds for individually tested machines. Test parts' measurement results have shown comparable achievable accuracies for all the tested machines.

Research limitations/implications

Speed evaluation is based on a 2k factorial design that assumes the linearity among individual points of the experiment. This design was chosen to keep the method as simple and quick as possible, in order to perform testing on those machines otherwise used in industrial environments. Accuracy evaluation was limited by a rather small sample size of ten fabricated test parts per machine.

Practical implications

The presented evaluation method can be used on any existing or future type of AM machine, and their comparative placement regarding achievable manufacturing speed and accuracy.

Originality/value

The presented method can be used to evaluate a machine regardless of the AM technology on which it is based.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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