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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2018

Ignatius Ekanem

The purpose of this paper is to present an exploration into the internationalisation approaches and mechanisms of diaspora entrepreneurs in emerging economies. It seeks to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an exploration into the internationalisation approaches and mechanisms of diaspora entrepreneurs in emerging economies. It seeks to conceptualise the strategies as a learning process.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is qualitative using a case study approach involving in-depth semi-structured interviews conducted longitudinally.

Findings

The findings suggest that diaspora entrepreneurs adopt mostly the network or, in some cases, the international new venture (born-global) market entry approach rather than the traditional stage by stage approach. The findings also suggest that diaspora entrepreneurs have perceived advantages over domestic small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) because of their foreign exposure which has influenced their entrepreneurial behaviour in exploiting business opportunities.

Practical implications

The main implication of the study is that entrepreneurs who are beginning to internationalise their activities should seek to exploit potential first-mover advantages in emerging economies by realising an approach of internationalisation at high speed.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to better understanding of the diaspora entrepreneurship and its dynamics.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Ignatius Ekanem

The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences in the entrepreneurial experiences between male and female entrepreneurs. The study investigates what entrepreneurs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences in the entrepreneurial experiences between male and female entrepreneurs. The study investigates what entrepreneurs learn, how they learn, who they learn from and what prompted such learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The data under analysis is drawn from a qualitative study which involves in-depth, semi-structured interviews conducted longitudinally as a case study in ten firms over a period of five years. The case study findings are analysed and discussed using a learning framework.

Findings

The findings suggest some differences in the learning experiences between male and female entrepreneurs. Whilst male entrepreneurs were more likely to challenge and depart from industry norms, thus utilising double-loop learning process, female entrepreneurs were more likely to engage in “routinised” learning which enhances confidence, thus adopting the single-loop learning process.

Research limitations/implications

The main implication of the study for policy makers is that unique training, networking and support programmes should be designed for women entrepreneurs. The study is limited to the extent that it can be generalised to a wider population of small businesses.

Originality/value

To date, there have only been speculations and little understanding about whether there are differences in the entrepreneurial learning experiences between men and women. Thus, policy makers have little guidance as to whether or not unique training and support programmes should be designed for female entrepreneurs. The study is novel in so far as it was conducted longitudinally over a period of five years to sufficiently follow the learning behavioural pattern of entrepreneurs in different business sectors.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Ignatius Ekanem

This paper aims to focus on liquidity management in small firms and how this may be best met. It seeks to present results from eight case study firms to demonstrate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on liquidity management in small firms and how this may be best met. It seeks to present results from eight case study firms to demonstrate different types of learning in small firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a qualitative methodology that involves in‐depth, semi‐structured interviews and direct observation, conducted longitudinally in eight case study companies.

Findings

The findings suggest that liquidity management is either based on owner‐manager past experiences, experiences of others or is strongly influenced by industry norms, which are shared rules within the industry, and not based on the calculation of costs and benefits of particular causes of action.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the extent to which it can be generalised to a wider population of small firms. The main implication is that policy makers should facilitate networking opportunities where owner‐managers can interact with external advisors.

Originality/value

The originality and value of the paper is that it conceptualises liquidity management in small firms as a learning process utilising closed and open loop learning.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Ignatius Ekanem

The purpose of this research is to present a detailed description of the qualitative research method adopted by the author in his doctoral research into the investment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to present a detailed description of the qualitative research method adopted by the author in his doctoral research into the investment decision‐making process in small manufacturing enterprises; and to inform small firm researchers generally, particularly those who may be considering the use of a qualitative research methodology for the first time in the study of processes of decision‐making.

Design/methodology/approach

“Insider accounts” is an innovative qualitative methodology, which involves in‐depth, semi‐structured interviews and direct observation, conducted longitudinally in a case study approach. It is a research method, which includes detailed accounts from the actors themselves, incorporating the actual motives and behaviour of owner‐managers. It is based on a philosophy that the “objects” studied are in fact “subjects”, producing accounts of their world.

Findings

The finding in the study for which this methodology was used is that owner‐managers predominantly use “bootstrapping” techniques for their investment appraisal rather than the more formal methods suggested in the financial management literature. So‐called “objective” studies of decision‐making process using questionnaires and positivist‐type approaches, do little to help to answer the basic questions relating to how and why decisions are taken. Without answering these questions it is impossible to recommend how practices can become more effective.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the extent to which it can be generalised to a wider population of small firms.

Originality/value

The paper presents a detailed description of a qualitative research method, “insider accounts”.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

David Smallbone, Marcello Bertotti and Ignatius Ekanem

To provide an initial assessment of the nature and extent of the involvement of Asian‐owned firms in the creative industries in London; to identify and assess any barriers…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide an initial assessment of the nature and extent of the involvement of Asian‐owned firms in the creative industries in London; to identify and assess any barriers they face; and draw out the implications for policy.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study, undertaken in late 2002. Data sources included official statistical data and previous reports, as well as a programme of semi‐structured, in‐depth interviews with 23 Asian entrepreneurs spread across eight sub‐sectors.

Findings

Asians are making a significant contribution to London's creative sectors, although they do face a number of specific constraints. Some of these are specific to the creative industries but others are shared with other small firms. However, few of these constraints appear to be exclusively Asian.

Research limitations/implications

There are some limitations relating to the small scale of the study and its focus on a single geographical location.

Practical implications

The research shows how (cultural) diversity can contribute to creativity and the competitiveness of regional economies, as well as individual businesses. This particularly applies in the creative industries because of extensive interlinkage with firms in other sectors.

Originality/value

In creative activities, cultural diversity is a source of potential competitiveness, because of the positive relationships between diversity, creativity and innovation. Asian owned firms in the creative sectors contrast with the low value added nature of many traditional areas of Asian business activity in the UK.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Harry Matlay

Abstract

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2011

Cordelia Osewa‐Ediae

This study seeks to assess the sustainability of black African Small/Medium Enterprises (BASMEs) in London – by identifying how several unique factors might impinge on…

Abstract

This study seeks to assess the sustainability of black African Small/Medium Enterprises (BASMEs) in London – by identifying how several unique factors might impinge on their propensity to flourish, falter or fail. In acknowledging the importance of break‐out to the sustainability of these businesses, this study explores whether an escapist mindset and low levels of acculturation could impinge on an entrepreneur’s willingness to overcome embeddedness, by reducing dependence on community linkages. Combining a synthesis of existing literature with a modicum of empirical research, this study finds that majority of the respondents were not “escapists entrepreneurs”. However, the escapists were more likely to operate businesses which may be failure‐prone as they were more likely to neglect pre‐start‐up preparations, less likely to approach institutional support systems for business support and more likely to favour embeddedness. Furthermore, acculturation levels were not found to have any effect on the entrepreneurs’ attitudes towards overcoming embeddedness and approaching institutions for business support. This study has both practical and social implications – as outlined in the main body of the paper.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

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