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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2014

Jarle Aarstad

Many networks take a small-world structure, with a high degree of clustering and shortcut ties that reduce the path-length between the clusters. It can be argued that…

Abstract

Purpose

Many networks take a small-world structure, with a high degree of clustering and shortcut ties that reduce the path-length between the clusters. It can be argued that small-world networks have benefits that are simultaneously related to network closures and the spanning of structural holes, but research on the network members’ performance is nonetheless inconclusive. The purpose of this paper is to argue that the concept of resource idiosyncrasy can explain the mixed findings. Firm idiosyncratic resources are not easily generalizable across enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

Industries may vary in terms of resource idiosyncrasy, and the paper elaborates how this can moderate shortcut ties’ effect on performance in an inter-firm network.

Findings

If resource idiosyncrasy predominates in an industry, the paper proposes that inter-firm shortcut ties may increase performance, whereas shortcut ties may decrease performance if non-idiosyncratic resources predominate.

Originality/value

Applying the concept of resource idiosyncrasy as a moderating variable, the paper aims to explain shortcut ties’ effect on performance in an inter-firm network. The theory advanced here can have practical implications and also motivate future empirical studies to gain further knowledge about small-world networks’ effect on performance.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Ina Fourie

When using information communication technology (ICT) devices it is easy to be trapped by purely the purpose of their design, how they are marketed, product reviews and…

Abstract

Purpose

When using information communication technology (ICT) devices it is easy to be trapped by purely the purpose of their design, how they are marketed, product reviews and noting, or even copying, the behaviour of the younger, Net Generation. The purpose of this column is to argue for encouraging all to contribute to deepening our understanding of fully exploiting technology. This includes encouraging people who may be less techno‐savvy but with a richer life‐world and life‐experience to share their use of devices such as tablets, and to allow all to benefit from the idiosyncrasy in use that should be aimed at a life‐fit with personality, learning style, preferences, etc., and widening information spaces and information horizons.

Design/methodology/approach

The column is written against the background of research from information behaviour, and the learning sciences (especially andragogics).

Findings

There are many reasons to explore more than the obvious ways in which ICT devices such as tablets can be used, and for encouraging a spectrum of users to share the idiosyncrasies in their use thereof. Library and information (LIS) services should move from merely teaching people information literacy and ICT skills to creating grounds for sharing practices and experiences in using devices such as tablets. The focus should move to exploiting the benefit of exploring idiosyncrasies in ICT use and how to encourage people to reflect their life‐world and life‐experience in their use of ICT devices such as tablets to widen their (and our) information spaces and information horizons.

Originality/value

Although much has been published on ICT in the library and information science literature and more recently in relation to the Net Generation, the author is not aware of publications exploiting idiosyncrasy and the value that can be added by considering the life‐world and life‐experience of people in their choices in using ICT devices such as tablets. This paper sets the background for further reflection.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2010

Elizabeth E. Umphress and Adam C. Stoverink

Purpose – We offer a view of interpersonal justice climate in which the benefits of fair treatment might be stronger within some groups versus others, depending on…

Abstract

Purpose – We offer a view of interpersonal justice climate in which the benefits of fair treatment might be stronger within some groups versus others, depending on characteristics of the supervisor, the group, and the organization in which the group is embedded. We further identify a potential silver lining that may be associated with low interpersonal justice climate. Overall, our intent of this chapter is to offer a more nuanced view of the topic to enhance our understanding of interpersonal justice within groups.

Design/methodology/approach – We review literature on status to support our propositions.

Findings – We examine how a supervisor's idiosyncrasy credits, a group's status, and an organization's emphasis on hierarchy will moderate the relationship between unfair interpersonal treatment from a supervisor and the group's perceived interpersonal justice climate. Also, we suggest that low levels of interpersonal justice climate may actually lead to greater affiliation among group members and ultimately enhance perceptions of group cohesion.

Originality/value – Previous literature on justice climate has largely focused on procedural justice, whereas generally ignoring interpersonal exchanges between a group and its supervisor. This chapter contributes to research on justice at the group level by examining the potential moderating effects of status on the generation of interpersonal justice climate. Further, and in contrast to previous research, we offer a potential positive outcome that may result from low interpersonal justice climate.

Details

Fairness and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-162-7

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Evgeniya Balabanova, Azer Efendiev, Mats Ehrnrooth and Alexei Koveshnikov

– The purpose of this paper is to examine managerial styles of Russian managers in the context of institutional and economic environment of contemporary Russia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine managerial styles of Russian managers in the context of institutional and economic environment of contemporary Russia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a sample of 482 line and middle managers covering eight geographic regions, 14 industries and 80 organizations in Russia.

Findings

Employing factor and cluster analyses the paper identifies four distinct managerial styles: paternalistic, exploitative, performance oriented and passive. In addition, the paper analyzes a number of contingent characteristics of these typological Russian managers such as their age, career development, regional, industrial and organizational presence.

Originality/value

The analysis enriches the understanding of managerial style idiosyncrasy, heterogeneity and evolution in Russia. The identified plurality of managerial styles, differentially related to a number of contingency variables, indicates that it pays off for western companies to avoid using stereotypical ideas when dealing with their Russian counterparts and employ conscious strategies when recruiting managers to their Russian operations instead.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Konstantinos Poulis and Efthimios Poulis

The purpose of this paper is to shed more light on the influence of a tourism‐oriented environment on the promotional channel strategies of fast‐moving consumer goods (FMCG) firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed more light on the influence of a tourism‐oriented environment on the promotional channel strategies of fast‐moving consumer goods (FMCG) firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilises an exploratory, qualitative research design among 14 case studies of FMCG firms operating in the tourism‐oriented environment of Greece.

Findings

Findings show that most firms utilise adapted promotional channels due to the influence of structural characteristics of the tourism industry and tourists' modes of behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The outcomes of this qualitative study are limited to the context that is investigated and thus, future researchers are encouraged to investigate similar contexts with the goal of generalising findings.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that firms ought to appreciate the contextual idiosyncrasies of Euro‐Mediterranean countries (as a result of international tourism) and thus, tailor their programs to these idiosyncrasies, which are distinct from other non‐tourism‐oriented environments.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first paper that investigates the effect of tourism‐induced idiosyncrasies of Euro‐Mediterranean countries on FMCG firms' promotional strategies. In light of the increasing importance of global consumer mobility, such studies are expected to increase.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Albrecht Becker, Burkhard Pedell and Dieter Pfaff

This study aims to present a brief overview of developments in management accounting research and practice in German-speaking countries, locate the contributions of this…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a brief overview of developments in management accounting research and practice in German-speaking countries, locate the contributions of this special issue in historical trajectories and provide an outlook of expected future developments in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

This study reviews the literature and draws a critically reflective approach.

Findings

A century after Schmalenbach, Germanic management and cost accounting have significantly changed, even though the roots of the cost accounting tradition of the late 19th and early 20th centuries are still visible in practice and teaching, which is true for both organisational practice and research. In both cases, an encroachment of the global on the local can be seen but, paradoxically, as Hopwood (1999) noted, the seemingly globally standardised accounting systems allow for local idiosyncrasies to specifically stand out. The anchoring of management accounting in financial accounting, the country-specific ownership and financing models, the importance of capital and labour markets (e.g. strong codetermination) for companies, regulations on corporate governance and the determination of the tax base are examples of institutions that can shape the behaviour of management and, thus, also idiosyncrasies of management accounting in a country.

Originality/value

The contributions of this special issue provide insight into developments in management accounting research and practice in German-speaking countries and, thus, enhance our understanding of the different historical trajectories and traditions in management accounting. The papers by Weber and Wiegmann and by Gisch et al. demonstrate how specific idiosyncratic practices and understandings of management accounting in German-speaking countries mediate global influences on management accounting in private- and public-sector organisations. The papers by Endenich et al. and ny Kreilkamp et al. show that the influence of international developments in management accounting research has become stronger in German-speaking management accounting academia.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Sungbum Park, Sang-ug Kang and Hangjung Zo

The purpose of this paper is to examine how user-perceived video quality, measured by computer assisted web survey, interacts with content richness (CR) and interactivity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how user-perceived video quality, measured by computer assisted web survey, interacts with content richness (CR) and interactivity (IA). It also analyzes how those internet protocol television (IPTV) idiosyncrasies impacts audience perceptions (perceived usefulness (PU) and perceived resistance (PR)) and actual subscriptions.

Design/methodology/approach

A computer assisted web survey was administered in Korea to collect data. A structural equation model and Z-test analyses were conducted to address the research hypotheses.

Findings

User-perceived video quality influences audience perceptions (PU and PR) through interaction with CR and IA. Subscriber perceptions have a causal relationship with IPTV subscriptions.

Practical implications

Balanced improvement of the IPTV value chain, from content to technical (platform, network, and terminal) perspectives, are necessary for IPTV diffusion. Also, IPTV providers should establish the diffusion strategies, minimizing the user-perceived restrictiveness as well as maximizing the PU.

Originality/value

This study shows computer assisted assessment of video quality can be applied to behavior science. The research model suggests PR, which has been relatively unnoticed is included in existing technology acceptance theories. The introduced antecedents of IPTV subscriptions can be referred to as key performance indicators regarding new media adoption studies.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Craig M. Parker and Tanya Castleman

The paper critiques a range of theories and evaluates their ability to provide a lens for explaining the idiosyncratic nature of small firms and their e‐business adoption…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper critiques a range of theories and evaluates their ability to provide a lens for explaining the idiosyncratic nature of small firms and their e‐business adoption decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

This literature review firstly summarises the existing research evidence that shows that small firms are idiosyncratic when it comes to e‐business adoption. It then critiques theories commonly used in the literature in this field to examine the extent to which they take this small firm idiosyncrasy into account when explaining e‐business adoption decisions.

Findings

The critical analysis shows that no commonly‐used theory adequately explains small firm adoption of e‐business because each omits important aspects of small firm idiosyncrasy. The analysis suggests that an integrated theoretical framework is needed. Preliminary ideas on this framework are provided.

Originality/value

Existing research generally applies a small number of selected theories and formulates research models of adoption factors. However, there is no systematic analysis of theories in this field and no consensus about theoretical frameworks. This paper addresses this limitation of the literature by critically evaluating the commonly used theories in terms of their individual suitability as lenses for explaining small firm e‐business adoption.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 22 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Kathleen Marshall Park and Anthony M. Gould

Merger waves have typically been viewed through the prism of either corporate strategy or macro-economics. This paper aims to broaden debate about factors that cause – or…

Abstract

Purpose

Merger waves have typically been viewed through the prism of either corporate strategy or macro-economics. This paper aims to broaden debate about factors that cause – or are associated with – mergers/merger waves over a 120-year period. It ascribes “personalities” to six distinct waves and draws an overarching conclusion about how merger architects are viewed.

Design/methodology/approach

Databases and interviews are used to piece together detail about CEOs associated with six distinct and recognized merger-waves during a 120-year focal period. The study establishes and defends, a priori, principles for interrogating data to get a sense of each wave-era’s corporate personality/idiosyncrasy. For each era, two exemplar CEO-profiles are presented and – through inductive-reasoning – held out as representative.

Findings

Distinct personalities are associated with six merger waves. Each wave is given a summary anthropomorphic description which conveys a sense that it may be viewed as the non-rationale expression of aggregate and historically distinct CEO behavior within a circumscribed timeframe.

Research limitations/implications

The work’s key limitation – explicitly acknowledged – is that it amassed data/evidence from disparate historical sources. However, the authors have developed and defended principles for addressing this concern.

Practical implications

Improved investment analyses, in particular. The work prefigures formal establishment of a new variable-set impacting share-price prediction.

Social implications

The paper offers a perspective on how psychological/personality-related variables impact management decision-making, creating something of a bridge between mostly non-overlapping research disciplines.

Originality/value

The paper broadens debate about how and why merger waves occur. It removes the exclusive analysis of merger waves from the hands of economic historians and strategic management theorists.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2016

Susana Costa e Silva

According to data released by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Ernst & Young, 2010), the Brazilian middle class is represented by approximately 100…

Abstract

Purpose

According to data released by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Ernst & Young, 2010), the Brazilian middle class is represented by approximately 100 million people. Moreover, according to the Brazilian Association of Importers and Manufactures of Motor Vehicle Companies (ABEIFA, 2015), Brazil was ranked fourth in the world in the ranking of major automobile consumers. This is undoubtedly a highly attractive market for world producers in this sector. However, the Brazilian automobile market has some specific features that require a very prudent operation. This case aims to investigate how those idiosyncrasies were approached by the Chinese car manufacturer JAC Motors, which in addition to not having previous experience in that market, also presented a negative country of origin image.

Methodology/approach

We rely on a case study method to better understand how the executives of this Chinese firm approached the Brazilian market.

Findings

Pulling and pushing factors are the basis of the adaptation process followed by the car manufacturer to better serve the identified idiosyncrasies. It was not only China that pushed JAC Motors to go abroad, but also Brazil that attracted (pulled) the car manufacturer’s investment. Additionally, there is evidence of pushing factors on the side of JAC’s strategy and pulling factors on the side of a Brazilian partner.

Research limitations/implications

Internationalisation decision-making processes often result from a combination of factors which gain a specific ‘momentum’ that result in an extraordinary occasion that provides a unique opportunity to invest abroad.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of the opportunity to invest abroad is the result of the alignment of pulling and pushing factors, in the country, the company and at the decision-making level.

Details

The Challenge of Bric Multinationals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-350-4

Keywords

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