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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

John Kanburi Bidzakin, Simon C. Fialor, Dadson Awunyo-Vitor and Iddrisu Yahaya

Even though many studies identify positive effects of contract farming (CF) on the livelihood of farmers, the use of CF as a tool to increase farm performance is unsettled…

Abstract

Purpose

Even though many studies identify positive effects of contract farming (CF) on the livelihood of farmers, the use of CF as a tool to increase farm performance is unsettled debate. Information on CF is relatively not available in staple food chains. Theoretical considerations have shown that there are challenges in employing CF in staple food chains such as rice. With the increasing trend of rice CF in Ghana, it is very critical to establish its performance in rice production in Ghana. It is therefore imperative to analyse the impact of CF on the performance of smallholder rice farmers.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted where 350 rice farmers selected through a stratified sampling technique using structured questionnaires were interviewed. Descriptive and inferential statistics including stochastic frontier analyses and endogenous treatment effect regression were used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results from the endogenous treatment effect regression model show that CF improves rice farmers' technical, allocative and economic efficiencies by 21, 23 and 26%, respectively. Farm size and CF were identified as common factors influencing technical, allocative and economic efficiency measures of the farmers positively. It further identified age of farmer, educational level and household labour as factors influencing farmers' participation in CF positively.

Research limitations/implications

It is recommended that CF is a good tool to enhance rice production efficiency, and hence, farmers should be encouraged to participate in CF as strategy to enhance the local rice production in Ghana.

Social implications

The outcome of this study has the potential to influence rice production in the country. The country is a net importer of rice and just about 35% self-sufficient in rice production.

Originality/value

This study is the first to assess performance of CF in rice crop production in Ghana and also one of the few to use efficiency as a performance measure.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Iddrisu Yahaya, Krishna P. Pokharel, Abdul-Fatahi Alidu and Fred Amofa Yamoah

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of participation in sustainable agricultural intensification practices (SAIPs) on household food security status in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of participation in sustainable agricultural intensification practices (SAIPs) on household food security status in Northwestern Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) indicator for the measurement of food access data from 168 households in ten communities from the Northwestern region of Ghana for the analyses. Households were categorised into participating households (treatment) and non-participating households (control). The endogenous treatment effects model was employed to evaluate the impact of participation in SAIPs training on food insecurity access scale.

Findings

The results show that participation in SAIPs training lowers, on average, the household food insecurity access by 2.95 points, approximately an 11 per cent reduction in HFIAS score. Other significant factors found to influence household food insecurity access scale are age of household head, experience in farming, total acres owned by household, income level of the household and occupation of the head of the household.

Research limitations/implications

The training programme of participation in SAIPs has massive implications for food security, rural economy and farmers’ livelihoods. However, due to the unique conditions prevailing in Northwestern Ghana, the findings of this research are limited in terms of their generalisability. Future research direction in the area of SAIPs trainings and impact study replications in all qualifying rural food production areas in Ghana, which are susceptible to household food insecurity, will provide a national picture of the efficacy of SAIPs trainings on household food insecurity.

Practical implications

A proven means to decrease natural resource degradation, increase crops yields, and increase subsistence farmers’ income, and food security is an important intervention to resolve the seasonal food shortage, which last for five months in a typical year for agro-food-dependent farming communities in Northwestern Ghana.

Social implications

Ensuring household food security improvement and environmental sustainability will help improve living standards of food producers and reduce the adverse social challenges associated with food insecure communities such as health problems due to food deficiencies, social inequalities, environmental pollution and natural resource degradation in Northwestern Ghana.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is the novel thought and approach to examine the impact of the SAIPs trainings on household food security in Northwestern Ghana using the household food insecurity access scale indicator. The study also examined the factors that affect household food security using the endogenous treatment model, which also evaluates the impact of the training programme on the outcome variable.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Iddrisu Yahaya, Fred A. Yamoah and Faizal Adams

The purpose of this paper is to assess consumer motivation and willingness to pay (WTP) for “safer” vegetables from the use of non-treatment options of wastewater use in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess consumer motivation and willingness to pay (WTP) for “safer” vegetables from the use of non-treatment options of wastewater use in urban/peri-urban vegetable production.

Design/methodology/approach

As a theoretical basis, consumer theory of maximizing utility being an indicator of individual preference was examined through choice experiment (CE) method to measure the WTP for value of safety within the context of health reduced risk (pathogen reduction) of illness. WTP was tested empirically using survey data from 650 households in the two largest cities in Ghana (Accra and Kumasi) that are characterized by a number of well-established vegetable producers who use wastewater in their production and a large urban and peri-urban vegetable consumer market.

Findings

Experience of vegetable borne diseases drives the need for safer vegetables and income and gender are key demographic factors influencing WTP. It was further found that consumers are willing to pay an average amount of GH¢ 4.7 ($2.40) per month for a technology change that would result in the production of “safer” vegetables.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding WTP offers insight into consumer concerns, behaviour and their readiness to pay for safer vegetable options. However, a further consideration of the impact of the combinations of the various non-treatment options on pathogen reduction and the assessment of the financial viability of each option will collectively ensure an efficient and cost-effective implementation of the technologies.

Practical implications

WTP insight gained has implications for vegetable production, marketing and public health policy. The understanding from the findings forms a solid basis to canvass for certification system for urban/peri urban vegetables. The information provided also helps to formulate effective public education on the safety of vegetables.

Originality/value

Measuring WTP for safer vegetables by Ghanaian urban/peri-urban consumers is novel. The CE approach is robust and the findings can inform vegetable production and marketing decisions as well as public health policy formulation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Alexander Preko, Iddrisu Mohammed and Azizbek Allaberganov

This study aims to examine the antecedents of halal brand equity on destination brand equity (DBE) within the tourism sector. Although much has been done on halal tourism…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the antecedents of halal brand equity on destination brand equity (DBE) within the tourism sector. Although much has been done on halal tourism, the issue of halal and brand equity has received little attention in a non-Islamic state context.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the brand equity theory, 312 Muslim tourists were conveniently drawn from the Larabanga tourism site with the use of structural equation modelling technique to analyse the data.

Findings

The study revealed that halal brand awareness and halal value have positive and significant impact on DBE. Also, halal perceived brand quality and halal image had a negative but significant impact on DBE.

Research limitations/implications

This research is on a country-specific halal brand equity tourism destination, which means that the findings cannot be generalized to other geographical areas.

Practical implications

The study provides an insight into halal tourism and destination equity, which is important for marketers, the ministry of tourism and local tourism officials to support halal tourism in a non-Islamic country.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap by presenting the first comprehensive overview of halal brand equity research that enhances ongoing discussions in the hospitality and tourism field in a non-Islamic context and proposes priorities for future research.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2022

Geetilaxmi Mohapatra, Rahul Arora and Arun Kumar Giri

The main purpose of this paper is to examine the role of population aging in determining the health care expenditure (HCE) in India over the period 1981 to 2018.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to examine the role of population aging in determining the health care expenditure (HCE) in India over the period 1981 to 2018.

Design/methodology/approach

While establishing the linkage between population aging and HCE, the study has used economic growth, urbanization and CO2 emissions as control variables and used the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) approach to cointegration and VECM based Granger causality approach to estimate both the long-run and short-run relationships among the variables.

Findings

The results of the ARDL bounds test showed that there is a stable and long-run relationship among the variables. The long-run and short-run coefficients reveal that population aging and income per capita exert a statistically significant and positive effect on per capita HCE in India. The VECM causality evidence shows that there is a presence of short-run causality from economic growth and population aging to per capita HCE, urbanization to environmental degradation and further from aging to urbanization. However, the long-run causality evidence confirms unidirectional causality from population aging to the per capita HCE.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings could be improved by considering the changes in mortality rate over time because of other environmental factors such as air pollution, among others as control variables. Various other variables affecting the health of an aged person could be considered for better research outcome which is not included in the present study because of the paucity of data. However, the present research findings would certainly serve effective policy instrument aiming at maximizing health gains that are highly associated with the elderly population and economic growth towards achieving sustainable development in India.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of the present study lies in its estimation where the relationship between population aging and HCE is looked at while considering the impact of other environmental factors separately. The causal relationship is shown among the variables using updated econometrics time-series techniques. The study tried to resolve the ambiguity associated with the relationship between aging and HCE at a macro level.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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