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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Joy Jacqueline Pereira, Tan Ching Tiong and Ibrahim Komoo

Since independence, Malaysia has generally registered continuous economic growth and this development has brought about numerous benefits including improved social…

Abstract

Since independence, Malaysia has generally registered continuous economic growth and this development has brought about numerous benefits including improved social amenities and a trend toward greater urbanization of the population. Economic development in Malaysia has contributed to environmental degradation and uncontrolled physical development, especially in the urban areas. Protection of the environment has become a necessity rather than a luxury in order to maintain public health and well-being as well as to sustain the economic growth. As in most developing countries, there are many challenges facing the country, especially so in urban areas, where the human, physicochemical and biological environments are interlinked (Pereira & Komoo, 2004). One major challenge is the increasing occurrence of geological and flood-related disasters, causing property damage and high cost of maintenance as well as loss of lives, in extreme cases. In part, this is a manifestation of poor planning, and many of the problems related to hazards in urban areas are often exacerbated by human activities.

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Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction: An Asian Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-485-7

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Abstract

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Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction: An Asian Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-485-7

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Kogila Vani Annammala, Anand Nainar, Abdul Rahim Mohd Yusoff, Zulkifli Yusop, Kawi Bidin, Rory Peter Dominic Walsh, William H. Blake, Faizuan Abdullah, Dhinesh Sugumaran and Khuneswari Gopal Pillay

Although there have been extensive studies on the hydrological and erosional impacts of logging, relatively little is known about the impacts of conversion into…

Abstract

Although there have been extensive studies on the hydrological and erosional impacts of logging, relatively little is known about the impacts of conversion into agricultural plantation (namely rubber and oil palm). Furthermore, studies on morphological impacts, sediment-bound chemistry and forensic attribution of deposited sediment to their respective sources are scarcer. This chapter introduces the potential for using the multi-proxy sediment fingerprinting technique in this context. Featuring pilot projects in two major flood-prone river systems in Malaysia, the studies explore application of geochemistry-based sediment source ascription. The geochemical signatures of sediment mixtures on floodplains were compared to sediments from upstream source tributaries. The tributaries were hypothesised to have different geochemical signatures in response to dominant land management. The first case study took place in the Segama River system (4,023 km2) of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo where a mixture of primary forest, logged-forests and oil palm plantations were predominant. The second case study was in the Kelantan River Basin (13,100 km2) with two major tributaries (Galas River and Lebir River) where logged-forests and rubber and oil palm plantations are dominant land-uses. Both case studies demonstrated the applicability of this method in ascribing floodplain deposited sediment to their respective upstream sources. Preliminary results showed that trace elements associated with fertilisers (e.g. copper and vanadium) contribute to agricultural catchment signatures. Alkaline and alkaline-earth elements were linked to recently established oil palm plantations due to soil turnover. Mixing model outputs showed that contributions from smaller, more severely disturbed catchment are higher than those from larger but milder disturbed catchments. This method capitalises on flood events to counter its adverse impacts by identifying high-priority sediment source areas for efficient and effective management.

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Improving Flood Management, Prediction and Monitoring
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-552-4

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Azimin Tazilan

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new approach in redefining and identifying microarchitecture (MCR) units in Malaysia. With case studies in the Langkawi Geopark…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new approach in redefining and identifying microarchitecture (MCR) units in Malaysia. With case studies in the Langkawi Geopark area, it promotes better recognition of urban sustainability through classification, design and intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates empirically selected sites in Malaysia to understand the MCR typological uses. With findings from case studies, it follows a systematic approach in developing a conceptual classification model for MCR as an urban ecosystem to understand its structure, function, and metabolism patterns towards sustainability.

Findings

MCR terminology, identification and classification has been redefined for better design and planning practices to related stakeholders of MCR development.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new approach to sustainability by capturing the dynamic assessment and identification of MCR and its typoscape in Malaysia, using the Langkawi Geopark as a case study. It also presents a new practical classification analysis that should be of interest to users, the local authority, retailers, pedestrians, and stakeholders to develop better policies for the future.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Shida Irwana Omar, Abdul Ghapar Othman and Badaruddin Mohamed

The purpose of this paper is to examine the tourism life cycle of Langkawi Island, Malaysia. The paper seeks to investigate the stages of life cycle that the island has…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the tourism life cycle of Langkawi Island, Malaysia. The paper seeks to investigate the stages of life cycle that the island has passed through and at what stage the island is in today.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts Butler’s Tourism Area Life Cycle model as the research framework to describe the characteristics of each stage of the island’s tourism life cycle and determine the time scale of the stages. The evidence presented in the stages is derived from secondary sources dating from 1642 to present.

Findings

The findings indicate that the tourism life cycle in Langkawi Island has undergone four stages of development and that it is currently in the consolidation stage. Numerous characteristics suggested by Butler’s model for each stage are clearly discernible in the island’s tourism growth. The government serves as the major player and catalyst for tourism expansion in the island from one stage to the next.

Practical implications

It is hoped that the paper will contribute to a better understanding of how tourism and its market have evolved in Langkawi Island. The paper also provides insights on how future planning should be directed in more sustainable and responsible ways to position the island.

Originality/value

The paper delivers a comprehensive understanding on the tourism developmental process of Langkawi Island, besides facilitating the understanding of major fundamental causes and conditions and the accompanying transition in the stages. The paper also bridges the gaps in knowledge addressed in similar previous studies.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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