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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Mohammad Said Ibrahim Alshuaibi, Ahmad Said Ibrahim Alshuaibi, Faridahwati Mohd. Shamsudin and Darwina Ahmad Arshad

Social media is a popular communication tool for college students in many countries including Malaysia. Even though the literature indicates that the use of social media…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media is a popular communication tool for college students in many countries including Malaysia. Even though the literature indicates that the use of social media in a higher learning environment is likely to enhance academic performance of college students, the mechanism that explains such association is yet to be explored. Based on the claims that the integration of social media use is purposeful to enhance student engagement, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of student engagement as a potential mediator between social media use and academic performance of college students in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

A total number of 227 business students in one of the public universities in Malaysia were randomly chosen to participate in this study. Questionnaire was used as the main data collection technique, which was personally administered during class sessions. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling-partial least square (SEM-PLS).

Findings

The result showed the multidimensionality of student engagement. It also indicated that cognitive engagement mediated the relationship between social media and academic performance, but not behavioral, emotional, or agentic engagement. The result suggests that social media has the potential to be used in a learning environment as it promotes cognitive engagement of students in class and subsequently their academic performance and success.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of the present study is that the generalizability of the finding to a much larger population of students may be limited as the sampled students were recruited from business students in one of the public universities in Malaysia only. Students of different academic programs in different universities may have a different pattern of using the social media.

Practical implications

This study will help higher learning institutions and educators think of ways to integrate the use of social media in learning activities to help students achieve better academic performance. As shown by the findings, such use can encourage students to be cognitively engagedt in class in which the students can be more active learners.

Originality/value

The present study adds to the literature in social media use by addressing the issue of how it helps enhance academic performance of college students in a single model. Past studies tended to examine the role of social media and student engagement and the effect of student engagement on academic performance separately. Furthermore, this study took into consideration various types of social media used by college students who tend to have multiple accounts.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Valerie Priscilla Goby, Hamad Mohammed Ahmad Ali, Mohammed Ahmad Abdulwahed Lanjawi and Khalil Ibrahim Mohammed Ahmad Al Haddad

The aim of this study is to conduct an initial investigation of information sharing between the vast number of expatriate employees and the small minority of local…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to conduct an initial investigation of information sharing between the vast number of expatriate employees and the small minority of local employees in Dubai’s private sector workforce. Research on the impact of the workforce localization policy has highlighted the frequent marginalization of locals within the expatriate-dominated private sector. One form of this is the reluctance of expatriates to share information with local recruits, and the authors conducted this study to assess the reality and extent of this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors designed a brief interview survey to probe how Emirati employees secure workplace information and whether they experience information withholding on the part of expatriate colleagues. The authors also explored whether any such experience impacts on their attitudes to working in the private sector since this is a key factor in the success of the localization policy. Complete responses were received from 0.9 per cent of the total local private sector workforce.

Findings

A notable lack of information sharing emerged with 58 per cent of respondents reporting their expatriate colleagues’ and superiors’ reluctance to share information with them, and 63 per cent describing experiences of discriminatory behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The authors identify key cultural and communication issues relating to localization within Dubai’s multicultural workforce. These include the broader cultural factors that determine how Emiratis conceptualize information sharing. Future research can pursue this issue to help inform the development of supportive information sharing practices. Such practices are an essential part of the creation of a diversity climate, which is necessary to sustain localization.

Originality/value

This study is a pioneering attempt to empirically investigate the information sharing practices that Emirati private sector employees experience. It suggests that the exclusion of citizens from the workplace through practices such as “ghost Emiratization” reverberates in the workplace through a lack of information sharing.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Ibrahim Said Ahmad, Azuraliza Abu Bakar, Mohd Ridzwan Yaakub and Mohammad Darwich

Sequel movies are very popular; however, there are limited studies on sequel movie revenue prediction. The purpose of this paper is to propose a sentiment analysis based…

Abstract

Purpose

Sequel movies are very popular; however, there are limited studies on sequel movie revenue prediction. The purpose of this paper is to propose a sentiment analysis based model for sequel movie revenue prediction and to propose a missing value imputation method for the sequel revenue prediction dataset.

Design/methodology/approach

A sequel of a successful movie will most likely also be successful. Therefore, we propose a supervised learning approach in which data are created from sequel movies to predict the box-office revenue of an upcoming sequel. The algorithms used in the prediction are multiple linear regression, support vector machine and multilayer perceptron neural network.

Findings

The results show that using four sequel movies in a franchise to predict the box-office revenue of a fifth sequel achieved better prediction than using three sequels, which was also better than using two sequel movies.

Research limitations/implications

The model produced will be beneficial to movie producers and other stakeholders in the movie industry in deciding the viability of producing a movie sequel.

Originality/value

Previous studies do not give priority to sequel movies in movie revenue prediction. Additionally, a new missing value imputation method was introduced. Finally, sequel movie revenue prediction dataset was prepared.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 54 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Ahmad Ibrahim Said Karajeh

This study aims to investigate the relationship between earnings quality and corporate voluntary disclosure among Malaysian listed companies. Moreover, it examines the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between earnings quality and corporate voluntary disclosure among Malaysian listed companies. Moreover, it examines the moderating effect of the ownership structure on the relationship between earnings quality and corporate voluntary disclosure.

Design/methodology/approach

This study covers 300 companies listed on Bursa Malaysia. It has used strategic, financial and non-financial information to measure voluntary disclosure; earnings management, persistence and smoothness to measure earnings quality; and institutional and managerial shareholders to measure ownership structure. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to investigate if ownership structure moderates the relationship between earnings quality and corporate voluntary disclosure.

Findings

The results in this work imply that companies with high earnings quality are more likely to disclose voluntary information to help stakeholders. Furthermore, this study provides original evidence that institutional ownership and managerial ownership play a main role as moderating variables that influence management motives toward practices of voluntary disclosure and earnings quality.

Originality/value

Because of the limited number of empirical studies on the relationship between voluntary disclosure and earnings quality, this study fills a gap in the literature by investigating the relationship between them. In addition, a lack of research exists on the effects of ownership structure on the relationship between voluntary disclosure and the earnings quality. Therefore, this study makes an original contribution to the literature by using institutional and managerial ownership as moderating variables to investigate the effects of the ownership structure on the relationship between voluntary disclosure and earnings quality in Malaysian companies.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Siti Kudnie Sahari, Muhammad Kashif, Norsuzailina Mohamed Sutan, Zaidi Embong, Nik Amni Fathi Nik Zaini Fathi, Azrul Azlan Hamzah, Rohana Sapawi, Burhanuddin Yeop Majlis and Ibrahim Ahmad

The quality of GeOx–Ge interface and the equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) are the main issues in fabricating high-k/Ge gate stack due to the low-k of GeOx interfacial…

Abstract

Purpose

The quality of GeOx–Ge interface and the equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) are the main issues in fabricating high-k/Ge gate stack due to the low-k of GeOx interfacial layer (IL). Therefore, a precise study of the formation of GeOx IL and its contribution to EOT is of utmost importance. In this study, the GeOx ILs were formed through post-oxidation annealing of sputtered Al2O3 on the Ge substrate. The purpose of this paper is to report on growth kinetics and composition of IL between Al2O3 and Ge for HCl- and HF-last Ge surface.

Design/methodology/approach

After wet chemical cleaning with HCl or HF, Al2O3 was grown onto the Ge surface by RF sputtering. Thickness and composition of IL formed after post-anneal deposition at 400°C in dry oxygen ambience were evaluated as a function of deposition time by FESEM and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively.

Findings

It was observed that the composition and thickness of IL were dependent on the starting surface and an aluminum germinate-like composition was formed during RF sputtering for both HF- and HCl-last starting surface.

Originality/value

The novelty of this work is to investigate the starting surface of Ge to IL growth between Al2O3/Ge that will lead to the improvement in Ge metal insulator field effect transistors (MISFETs) application.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

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Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Michelle Priscilla and Sylvia Veronica Siregar

This study aims to analyze the effect of top management team (TMT) expertise on real earnings management (REM) and accrual earnings management (AEM) activities in…

Abstract

This study aims to analyze the effect of top management team (TMT) expertise on real earnings management (REM) and accrual earnings management (AEM) activities in companies in Indonesia by examining a hand-collected secondary data from non-financial publicly listed companies in Indonesia in 2016 and 2017. The expertise of TMT members is measured by possession of a master’s degree, understanding and experience of managed core functional areas, and possession of accounting certifications such as CA or CPA. The results of the study show that the expertise of the members of the TMT has no influence on the activity of AEM in companies in Indonesia. Meanwhile, understanding and experience on the managed core functional areas have a positive influence on REM activities through abnormal cash flows. Possession of accounting certification has a positive influence on REM activities in companies that are in accordance with managerial entrenchment effects, as well as a negative influence on REM activities in companies through abnormal discretionary expenses that are in line with incentive-reduction effects.

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Abstract

Details

Emerging Issues in Islamic Finance Law and Practice in Malaysia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-546-8

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Sadali Rasban, Adam Abdullah and Aznan Hasan

This paper aims to examine the current practice in Singapore regarding an inheritance issue: disposal of the residual net estate to the bayt al-māl, which is identified as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the current practice in Singapore regarding an inheritance issue: disposal of the residual net estate to the bayt al-māl, which is identified as the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore (Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, MUIS). The issue arises when the deceased leaves farḍ (fixed-share) heir(s) and/or dhawū al-arḥām (outer family members) but there is no ʿaṣabah (agnatic residuary heir by blood). Farḍ legal heirs are those beneficiaries for whom the Qurʾān prescribes inheritance of a pre-determined share. Disposal of the residual net estate to the bayt al-māl results in a reduction in the share due to the farḍ legal heir or worse, a total loss to the dhawū al-arḥām legal heirs.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach based on library and case study research has been adopted to elaborate practices that fall under the purview of the Administration of Muslim Law Acts (AMLA), Chapter 3.

Findings

The current practice seems biased against, especially, women and spouses. It creates high dissatisfaction in the community, especially those affected by such practices. This paper elaborates on the practice of residual net estate distribution in Singapore and the contemporary practices of the four Sunni madh-habs – the Ḥanafī, Mālikī, Shāfiʿī and Ḥanbalī jurisprudential schools – in other countries.

Research limitations/implications

In Singapore, Muslim law is defined and implemented by the civil court, not the Syariah Court or MUIS. The recommendation to change from the current classical practice by the Syariah Court and MUIS to the contemporary practice that is relevant to today’s context lies with the civil court and Government of Singapore. The choice for the Syariah Court and MUIS to adopt the contemporary practice as per Ḥanafī School by rule of the court or the government is beyond this research. Zayd ibn Thābit, Caliph Abū Bakr and a small number of companions held the view that the residue net estate asset must go to the bayt al-māl, the current classical practice. The contemporary practice adopted by Sayyidina ʿUthmān ibn ʿAffān, Jābir ibn Zayd and majority of the companions’ view, is not in favour of the residue net estate asset to go to the bayt al-māl; rather they view that it must be returned to the legal heirs.

Practical implications

Awareness in the community in the current controversial practice in Singapore when the residue net estate through the farāʾiḍ law was giving to bayt al-māl instead of returning to farḍ or dhawū al-arḥām in the absence of the ʿaṣabah legal heir as stated in the Inheritance Certificate issued by Syariah Court.

Social implications

To understand the contemporary Muslim law and the practical and just application in today’s Singapore context as supported by the AMLA, Chapter 3.

Originality/value

This is the first study that challenges the current practice by the Syariah Court and MUIS in Singapore, thereby endeavouring to restore justice to the community.

Details

ISRA International Journal of Islamic Finance, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0128-1976

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Hamed El Khayat, Marwa El Deeb, Mahmoud Elhabiby, Amira Mohammed Ibrahim Ahmad Mourad and Michael Elnemais Fawzy

This study aims to assess the relationship between sleep habits and obesity in children.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the relationship between sleep habits and obesity in children.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an observational cross-sectional case–control study conducted on 100 children aged 6–12 years, selected randomly from the OPC of the Pediatric Hospital, Ain-Shams University. The subjects were subdivided into two groups: the control group of 50 and the target group of children who are classed overweight or obese. Subjects were excluded where the obesity could be explained owing to an endocrinal and/or any identified disease, those who have a medical or psychiatric illness, and those whose parents refused to give consent. All patients had a full history taken, and each child’s parent fulfilled one questionnaire on sleep behaviors.

Findings

This study found that 72% with bedtime resistance compared to only 14% among the control subjects, 68% of children experienced a delay with sleep onset compared to 14% among controls, 68% experienced sleep duration abnormalities compared to 12% in the control group, 60% of children stated they needed their parents while going to sleep, compared to 12% among controls, 64% of cases suffered from walking during the night compared to 12% among controls, 64% of cases had a Parasomnia compared to 12% among controls, 66% of cases snoring loudly compared to 12% among controls, and 66% suffering from Apnea, compared to 6% in the control group, and 50% of cases had daytime sleepiness compared to 14% among controls.

Research limitations/implications

It is hoped that this research will be remedied through the adoption of a child-centered approach inspired by the rights to health and play, and the general principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC).

Practical implications

The results showed a strong association between excessive weight and increased risk of sleep problems, which were broadly diffused in the population childhood.

Originality/value

This current study has given us a base for the overwhelming fact that these children are directly affected by obesity. A chronic medical condition has enormous implications on health and can lead to many associated disease processes.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Zamri Ahmad, Haslindar Ibrahim and Jasman Tuyon

This paper aims to explore the relevance of bounded rationality to the practice of institutional investors in Malaysia. Understanding institutional investor behavior is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relevance of bounded rationality to the practice of institutional investors in Malaysia. Understanding institutional investor behavior is important, as it can determine the asset prices and consequently the market behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of questionnaires is used to solicit information regarding the understanding and practical application of behavioral finance theories and strategies among fund managers in the Malaysian investment management practice. In the process, bounded rational theory is aimed to be validated. Fund managers’ possible bounded rational behavior is assessed with reference to their investment management approaches and strategies right from individual beliefs and acquisition of information, as well as investment management and strategies used.

Findings

The findings lend support to the notion that institutional investors too, being normal human beings, are expected to think and behave in a boundedly rational manner as postulated in bounded rational theory. The sources of bounded rationality are individual, institutional and social forces. Thus, portfolio trading and investment management strategies are exposed to wide varieties of behavioral risks. Despite the notions that behavioral risks are real and the impact on fund performance could be pervasive, fund managers’ self-awareness regarding control and institutional readiness to govern behavioral risks in investment practices is still low.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical evidence drawn in the current paper is subjected to small sample size and specific focus on Malaysian context. Despite this limitation, the sample is statistically sufficient and provides a fair representation, as well as quality opinions, of fund manager’s investment management behavior in Malaysia. This research provides valuable implications to practitioners (fund managers) and regulators (investment management and capital market policymakers). In practice, the current study draws some practical ideas, especially for buy-side institutional investors, on the source and impact of behavioral biases on fund management practices and performance. For regulators, this research highlighted the needs and possible ways to regulate these behavioral risks.

Originality/value

The current paper provides new insights on the theory and practice of the institutional investor. In theory, this research provides evidence of bounded rationality of institutional investor behavior, practicing in the asset management industry in the emerging markets of Malaysia. This evidence lends support to the validity of the bounded rationality theory in explaining institutional investor behavior. In practice, thisresearch provides new insights on the relevance of behavioral finance perspectives and strategies in the asset management industry practice and policy.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

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