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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Ibeawuchi K. Enwereuzor, Lawrence E. Ugwu and Leonard I. Ugwu

Despite the importance of knowledge sharing (KS), organizations find it difficult to motivate their employees to share their knowledge with co-workers. Based on a combination of…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the importance of knowledge sharing (KS), organizations find it difficult to motivate their employees to share their knowledge with co-workers. Based on a combination of the group value model and the socialization resources theory (SRT), this study is, therefore, an endeavor to contribute to the understanding of how organizations can develop efficacious tacit knowledge sharing (TKS)-strategies by harnessing insights from the impact of respectful engagement (RE) and workplace friendship (i.e. friendship opportunity and friendship prevalence).

Design/methodology/approach

Group value model and SRT are used to develop a new pathway to TKS which focuses on how RE among employees contributes to the development of workplace friendship which in turn facilitates TKS. Self-reported data were collected online from 593 employees working in various organizational sectors. Hypotheses were tested with structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The results suggest that RE is an essential precursor of TKS, having both direct positive relationship with TKS and partial indirect positive relationship through friendship opportunity and friendship prevalence. RE was also positively related to the two facets of workplace friendship (i.e. friendship opportunity and friendship prevalence). Both friendship opportunity and friendship prevalence were positively related to TKS.

Practical implications

These findings underscore the importance of implementing initiatives that support positive interrelations characterized by respect at work in order to promote TKS.

Originality/value

By linking RE to TKS, this study adds new insight to the relational basis of sharing personal asset/resource as tacit knowledge. The inclusion of mediation path helps in shedding light and opening up a black box of RE-TKS interface.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Ibeawuchi K. Enwereuzor and Lawrence E. Ugwu

Considering that leaders play an important role in influencing the work environment and experiences of subordinates as well as the fact that employees like to be respected, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering that leaders play an important role in influencing the work environment and experiences of subordinates as well as the fact that employees like to be respected, the purpose of the current study was to explore supportive supervisor relations as a mediator of the relationship between respectful leadership and intention to stay.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 389 hospital nurses based on authors' personal networks at three measurement points. This was done to avoid problems associated with collecting data for predictor and criterion variables from the same source at the same time. The direct and indirect effects were tested with ordinary least squares regression-based path analysis.

Findings

Respectful leadership was found to be positively related to both supportive supervisor relations and intention to stay. In addition, supportive supervisor relations had a positive relationship with intention to stay. Finally, the relationship between respectful leadership and intention to stay was mediated by supportive supervisor relations.

Research limitations/implications

The sample were drawn from nurses only in a particularly region of a country and differences may exist among other occupational groups and geographical areas of the country in the way they perceive their leaders' behavior.

Practical implications

Management of health facilities can utilize information from annual reviews and feedback from subordinates as performance evaluation criteria for rewarding leaders who treat their subordinates respectfully. However, leaders who are disrespectful toward their subordinates could be identified and subjected to mandatory training on respectful leadership.

Originality/value

The current study extends the present state of research on the impact exerted by respectful leadership in an organizational context never examined heretofore; that is, health care context. This is also the first study linking respectful leadership, supportive supervisor relations and intention to stay in unison in a single study.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2020

Ibeawuchi K. Enwereuzor, Busayo A. Adeyemi and Ike E. Onyishi

Although a great number of studies have established the important role of leadership in workplace safety, it appears researchers are yet to consider the role that trust in leaders…

1646

Abstract

Purpose

Although a great number of studies have established the important role of leadership in workplace safety, it appears researchers are yet to consider the role that trust in leaders could play between ethical leadership and safety compliance within healthcare. To address that imbalance, this study aims to investigate the relationship between ethical leadership and safety compliance, with trust in the leader as the mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in three time periods from 237 hospital staff nurses (76.8 per cent women and 23.2 per cent men). Ordinary least squares regression-based path analysis using PROCESS for statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) macro was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results showed that ethical leadership was positively related to trust in a leader but was not related to safety compliance. In addition, trust in leader was positively related to safety compliance and also mediated the positive relationship between ethical leadership and safety compliance.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected within healthcare organisations in a few localities in Nigeria, making it difficult to generalise the findings beyond the current sample let alone the entire country or even continent.

Practical implications

The findings imply that ethical leadership may not be directly effective in improving the safety compliance of subordinate nurses unless such a leader first develops a trust-based relationship with the subordinates.

Originality/value

The current study builds on and extends the burgeoning research in the area of leadership and employee outcome by investigating not only the direct relationship between ethical leadership and safety compliance but also incorporating trust in a leader as a mediator of this relationship.

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2022

Ibeawuchi K. Enwereuzor, Chima Agwu Abel and Leonard I. Ugwu

Given the intensified need to be responsive to change, employees' discretionary and constructive efforts, such as those aimed at effecting workplace functional change (i.e. taking…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the intensified need to be responsive to change, employees' discretionary and constructive efforts, such as those aimed at effecting workplace functional change (i.e. taking charge), are required to enhance organizational effectiveness. Therefore, the authors reckon that due to their serving attitude of prioritizing the needs of others above the self and their motivational qualities, the servant leadership approach can enhance the confidence of subordinates' capabilities to perform a range of meaningful activities (i.e. role breadth self-efficacy; RBSE), which in turn should facilitate their engagement in taking charge.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 324 leader-subordinate dyads (i.e. academicians) from two federal universities in Nigeria. The authors assessed the measurement and structural models with partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

This study found that servant leadership and RBSE were crucial enablers of subordinates' taking charge. Furthermore, a positive relationship between servant leadership and RBSE was found. Lastly, RBSE was a partial mediating mechanism partly underlying the positive relationship between servant leadership and taking charge.

Practical implications

Selecting and training leaders to practice servant leadership in Nigerian public universities may serve as a springboard for employees to take charge because it also enables them to develop their RBSE.

Originality/value

The current study sheds light on the psychological process through which servant leadership affects subordinates' taking charge by identifying RBSE as a crucial motivational state partly underlying the process.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2023

Ibeawuchi K. Enwereuzor

As knowledge hiding is prevalent and often leaves severe detrimental consequences in its wake, it is imperative to place strategies on the front burner to identify its potential…

Abstract

Purpose

As knowledge hiding is prevalent and often leaves severe detrimental consequences in its wake, it is imperative to place strategies on the front burner to identify its potential antecedents forthwith if there is going to be any headway to curtail the incidence of this phenomenon in organizations. Therefore, this study aims to examine the relationship between dispositional greed and knowledge hiding with the perceived loss of knowledge power as an underlying mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-wave, three weeks apart strategy was used for data collection. A sample of 262 employees working full-time in various organizations operating across different industries in Nigeria participated in this study. Data were analyzed with partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results showed that dispositional greed related positively to a perceived loss of knowledge power but insignificantly to any of the three dimensions of knowledge hiding (i.e. playing dumb, evasive hiding and rationalized hiding). On the other hand, the relationship between perceived loss of knowledge power and the three dimensions of knowledge hiding was positive. Finally, dispositional greed had an indirect positive relationship with the three dimensions of knowledge hiding through perceived loss of knowledge power.

Research limitations/implications

All the variables were self-reported, which may lead to the same source bias.

Practical implications

Human resources managers can subject employees to cognitive restructuring training to help them identify thinking patterns that contribute to the perception of losing their power in the organization if they share knowledge and help reshape their perceptions regarding knowledge sharing. Management can use rewards to encourage employees to adopt knowledge sharing and refrain from knowledge hiding as a desired organizational norm.

Originality/value

This study offers novel insights that identify an underlying mechanism that encourages greedy employees to enact knowledge hiding.

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2023

Ibeawuchi K. Enwereuzor, Amuche B. Onyishi and Fumnanya Ekwesaranna

Supervisory abuse is a form of destructive leadership. Research has continued to document many deleterious consequences associated with such improper behavior at work. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

Supervisory abuse is a form of destructive leadership. Research has continued to document many deleterious consequences associated with such improper behavior at work. This study further extends its consequences by testing a model linking abusive supervision to job apathy through a climate of fear.

Design/methodology/approach

This study drew on affective events theory in investigating the role of the climate of fear in instances where casual workers perceive abuse in commercial banks. A three-wave and three-week time lag approach was adopted for data collection from 245 casual workers in southeastern Nigeria.

Findings

Results from partial least squares structural equation modeling supported the model by showing that abusive supervision had a direct positive relationship with the climate of fear and job apathy, while the climate of fear related positively to job apathy. Results also revealed that the climate of fear partially mediated the relationship between abusive supervision and job apathy.

Practical implications

Managers can be trained to become more supportive and less abusive to address the problem of abusive supervision. Furthermore, casual workers are encouraged to report any abuse from their manager to higher authorities inside or outside their workplace.

Originality/value

This study sheds new insights and advances the abusive supervision literature by investigating the climate of fear as the underlying mechanism.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Ibeawuchi K. Enwereuzor, Lawrence E. Ugwu and Ebele E. Nnadozie

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the quality of a subordinate's relationship with his or her direct supervisor influences the subordinate's psychological well-being and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the quality of a subordinate's relationship with his or her direct supervisor influences the subordinate's psychological well-being and to examine the moderating role of person-supervisor (P-S) fit between these two variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample for this study consists of 418 academic employees of two federal universities. Relationship quality, P-S fit, psychological well-being and demographics were self-reported by the participants using existing scales. Hypotheses were tested with partial least squares-structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) using SmartPLS 3.2.8.

Findings

Results of the PLS-SEM showed that the positive relationship between relationship quality and psychological well-being was moderated by P-S fit, such that the relationship was stronger when P-S fit was low rather than high.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of homogeneous sample size of university academic employees may not be representative of the general population of such employees within the country.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the importance of taking into account the complex interplay between relationship quality and P-S fit when optimising employee's psychological well-being is the focus.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, we are not aware of any studies that have examined the moderating role of P-S fit between relationship quality and subordinate's psychological well-being in the university context.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Ike E. Onyishi, Ibeawuchi K. Enwereuzor, Afam N. Ituma and J. Tochukwu Omenma

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of perceived employability in the relationship between core self-evaluations (CSEs) and job search behaviour…

2090

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of perceived employability in the relationship between core self-evaluations (CSEs) and job search behaviour (preparatory and active job search).

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey data were obtained among a sample of 254 employed and unemployed graduate students from a university in Southeast Nigeria.

Findings

Results of the hierarchical multiple regression show that CSEs was significantly and positively associated with only preparatory job search behaviour but not active job search behaviour. CSEs was positively associated with perceived employability. Perceived employability was positively associated with the preparatory job search but not active job search. Perceived employability also mediated the relationship between CSEs and preparatory job search but failed to mediate the relationship between CSEs and active job search.

Research limitations/implications

The study makes important contribution to the literature on job search by augmenting our understanding on the mechanism that govern core self-evaluation and job search behaviour relationship.

Practical implications

Human resources practitioners can use the insights of the present study in understanding aspects of jobseekers’ personality and perception that may be relevant in job search behaviour. The study has also implications for career development practice especially in the areas of counselling of job seekers in environments where there is high level of unemployment.

Originality/value

There has been rarely any previous attempt at investigating the possibility that the relationship between CSEs and job search behaviour is mediated by perceived employability.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2021

Ibeawuchi Kingsley Enwereuzor

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between diversity climate and tacit knowledge sharing and the mediating role of workplace belongingness between them.

1706

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between diversity climate and tacit knowledge sharing and the mediating role of workplace belongingness between them.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample for this study consists of 495 employees (52.1% male, n = 258) drawn from varied occupational groups. Data were collected online using existing self-report measures. Hypotheses were tested with ordinary least squares regression-based path analysis.

Findings

This study provides evidence that diversity climate is positively related to workplace belongingness and tacit knowledge sharing. Furthermore, workplace belongingness is positively related to tacit knowledge sharing. Finally, workplace belongingness mediates the relationship between diversity climate and tacit knowledge sharing.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the need for organizations to promote fair human resource (HR) policies and practices by enacting and judiciously implementing policies that promote inclusiveness and fair treatment to stand a chance of benefiting from employees’ tacit knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

This study builds on existing research but shifts the focus to the influence of diversity climate on tacit knowledge sharing and thus sets up a precedent for subsequent research in this area. This study is, therefore, the first to attempt to link diversity climate to tacit knowledge sharing through workplace belongingness.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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