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1 – 10 of 105
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Ian Yates, Guy Holmes and Helena Priest

This paper seeks to discuss recent research concerning the subjective experience of recovery from severe mental health difficulties, with the aim of appraising the extent…

307

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss recent research concerning the subjective experience of recovery from severe mental health difficulties, with the aim of appraising the extent to which this literature has attended to the role of environmental and social conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an overview of research focusing on environmental and social conditions and mental health generally, a focused literature review was undertaken to analyse gaps within the recovery literature, specifically in relation to the importance of environmental or social contexts. Thematic analysis was used to derive salient themes from this literature. Research methodologies are appraised with regards to the extent to which they are congruent with an examination of the context of recovery.

Findings

A total of 11 papers relating to the impact of place or context on recovery were reviewed. Key themes identified were: the relationship between place, social context, and identity; safety and security; social connectedness; and contradictory impacts of the mental health system. The authors argue that recent qualitative research has over emphasised the subjective experience of recovery at the expense of a rich description of the place in which research is conducted. This approach dislocates recovery from its geographical location and the wider political and economic system in which it occurs.

Originality/value

A gap is identified within the current literature concerning recovery from severe mental health difficulties. In order to better understand the environmental factors that contribute to recovery, research needs to include rich descriptions of place, i.e. the physical and social environment as situated within the wider political and economic context.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Christine Bruce, Kate Davis, Hilary Hughes, Helen Partridge and Ian Stoodley

The purpose of this book is to open a conversation on the idea of information experience, which we understand to be a complex, multidimensional engagement with…

Abstract

The purpose of this book is to open a conversation on the idea of information experience, which we understand to be a complex, multidimensional engagement with information. In developing the book we invited colleagues to propose a chapter on any aspect of information experience, for example conceptual, methodological or empirical. We invited them to express their interpretation of information experience, to contribute to the development of this concept. The book has thus become a vehicle for interested researchers and practitioners to explore their thinking around information experience, including relationships between information experience, learning experience, user experience and similar constructs. It represents a collective awareness of information experience in contemporary research and practice. Through this sharing of multiple perspectives, our insights into possible ways of interpreting information experience, and its relationship to other concepts in information research and practice, is enhanced. In this chapter, we introduce the idea of information experience. We also outline the book and its chapters, and bring together some emerging alternative views and approaches to this important idea.

Details

Information Experience: Approaches to Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-815-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Guoping Huang, Stephanie Yates, Grant Ian Thrall and Richard Peiser

Mortgage defaults within a neighborhood may tip the scales whereby a vicious cycle of disinvestment and deterioration in the surrounding neighborhoods begins. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Mortgage defaults within a neighborhood may tip the scales whereby a vicious cycle of disinvestment and deterioration in the surrounding neighborhoods begins. This paper aims to examine the impact that mortgage default has on properties in the same ZIP code and neighboring ZIP codes.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypothesizing that neighborhoods' susceptibility to cascade failure can be measured by the rate of acceleration of mortgage failures within the neighborhood, the paper introduces a model to investigate whether or not this vicious cycle is such that mortgage failures multiply, and there is a tipping point at which the downward cycle accelerate.

Findings

The paper applies the model to data for the Los Angeles metropolitan area for the period 2006-2007 and finds evidence of a tipping point.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited by the availability of data with respect to both time and space.

Practical implications

A failure tipping point will provide a signal that mortgage crisis is pending. Reacting to this signal could allow financial markets to avert such crises in the future.

Social implications

Some neighborhoods may resist being labelled as one with significant mortgage failure activity. This resistance may cause a negative reaction to these results and implementation for the findings.

Originality/value

To-date, no evidence of a mortgage failure tipping point has been discovered in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Ian Rowlands and David Bawden

The digital library is a socio‐technical concept of great significance. It redefines the relationships between information providers and intermediaries and, potentially…

2317

Abstract

The digital library is a socio‐technical concept of great significance. It redefines the relationships between information providers and intermediaries and, potentially, transforms the way that services are delivered to users. This article, based on a British Library Research & Innovation Centre funded study, reviews current themes and directions in digital library research and scholarship. It locates the digital library in a simple work‐oriented framework emphasising its social as well as its systems and informational dimensions. The article highlights differences in understanding of the digital library construct between the library and computer science communities and identifies some critical areas for further research.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 51 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1971

The CEGB pays half the wages of bird warden Bob Scott who patrols the Dungeness power complex—just one of the ways much‐maligned industry is positively helping nature…

Abstract

The CEGB pays half the wages of bird warden Bob Scott who patrols the Dungeness power complex—just one of the ways much‐maligned industry is positively helping nature. Report by Ian Mandle: pictures by Eddie Ryle‐Hodges.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 71 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2013

Christine S. Bruce, Mary M. Somerville, Ian Stoodley and Helen Partridge

This article uses the idea of informed learning, an interpretation of information literacy that focuses on people’s information experiences rather than their skills or…

Abstract

This article uses the idea of informed learning, an interpretation of information literacy that focuses on people’s information experiences rather than their skills or attributes, to analyse the character of using information to learn in diverse communities and settings, including digital, faith, indigenous and ethnic communities. While researchers of information behaviour or information seeking and use have investigated people’s information worlds in diverse contexts, this work is still at its earliest stages in the information literacy domain. To date, information literacy research has largely occurred in what might be considered mainstream educational and workplace contexts, with some emerging work in community settings. These have been mostly in academic libraries, schools and government workplaces. What does information literacy look like beyond these environments? How might we understand the experience of effective information use in a range of community settings, from the perspective of empirical research and other sources? The article concludes by commenting on the significance of diversifying the range of information experience contexts, for information literacy research and professional practice.

Details

Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Christine Bruce, Mary M. Somerville, Ian Stoodley and Helen Partridge

This chapter uses the idea of informed learning, an interpretation of information literacy that focuses on people’s information experiences rather than their skills or…

Abstract

This chapter uses the idea of informed learning, an interpretation of information literacy that focuses on people’s information experiences rather than their skills or attributes, to analyse the character of using information to learn in diverse communities and settings, including digital, faith, indigenous and ethnic communities. While researchers of information behaviour or information seeking and use have investigated people’s information worlds in diverse contexts, this work is still at its earliest stages in the information literacy domain. To date, information literacy research has largely occurred in what might be considered mainstream educational and workplace contexts, with some emerging work in community settings. These have been mostly in academic libraries, schools and government workplaces. What does information literacy look like beyond these environments? How might we understand the experience of effective information use in a range of community settings, from the perspective of empirical research and other sources? The chapter concludes by commenting on the significance of diversifying the range of information experience contexts, for information literacy research and professional practice.

Details

Information Experience: Approaches to Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-815-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1962

W.A. MUNFORD

In his introduction to Golspie: Contributions to its Folklore, Nicholson tells how he and his wife and three daughters first went there during the summer of 1891 when…

Abstract

In his introduction to Golspie: Contributions to its Folklore, Nicholson tells how he and his wife and three daughters first went there during the summer of 1891 when, crowded out of Nairn and seeking shores “for the feet of the paddler or the spade of the digger”, they found there “all that we craved”. His book is a charming medley of children's games, ghost stories, customs and superstitions, weather beliefs and archæology—with special emphasis on Pictish inscriptions. It was printed by the Oxford University Press and published by David Nutt in dark green cloth. A Highland scene and four happy little girls playing the local ring game of Hilli Ballu—over one fine of its air—are gold stamped on the front board; the locally significant wild cat's head decorates the spine and there is an outline map of Sutherland on the back. The whole book is obviously the work of a man of wide human sympathies, insatiable curiosity, untiring perseverance and an immense affection for children. Are there better basic qualities for a librarian? Golspie is equally obviously the work of a dogmatic man who takes himself and his thoughts and activities very seriously, and who displays few signs of a sense of humour. But then these basic qualities have manifested themselves in other librarians also. Who was this E. W. B. Nicholson and what did he do?

Details

Library Review, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2019

Joanna Bohatko-Naismith, Carole James, Maya Guest, Darren Anthony Rivett and Samantha Ashby

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the injured worker’s perspective of experiences with their workplace return to work coordinator (RTWC), and explore…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the injured worker’s perspective of experiences with their workplace return to work coordinator (RTWC), and explore some of the barriers they encountered in the return to work process.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten injured workers from New South Wales, Australia. The thematic analysis of transcripts was completed.

Findings

The findings provide an insight into the experiences of injured workers and their relationship with RTWCs. Five key themes emerged from the data: return to work experiences and the RTWC role, high turnover and lack of consistency in the role, RTWC “ideal”, knowledge and skills, communication skills and the RTWC role and GP visits privacy and conflict of interest with peer RTWCs.

Practical implications

The role of the workplace RTWC in the return to work process for injured workers is important and these findings are highly relevant to the return to work sector. Consistency within the role at the workplace and careful consideration of the specific traits and characteristics required by an individual to perform the role need to be observed during the selection process by employers when appointing a workplace RTWC to assist injured workers return to work.

Originality/value

This is the first Australian study to examine the injured workers views and experiences with the workplace RTWC and other factors that shape the return to work process.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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