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Article

Ian S. Richardson

Lancaster University was a pioneer in library automation in the early 1970s. The last ten years have seen a consolidation of these early systems, a change to a more…

Abstract

Lancaster University was a pioneer in library automation in the early 1970s. The last ten years have seen a consolidation of these early systems, a change to a more effective circulation system, and gradual enhancements. Lack of funding has impeded further developments, but has now led to the development of a strategy which it is hoped will lead to the creation of a ‘future‐proof’ environment based on in‐house developed software using the Pick operating system.

Details

Program, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article

Ian S. Richardson

Downsizing is the concept of utilising low cost equipment (often IBM PCs or compatibles) for applications that previously required relatively large and expensive…

Abstract

Downsizing is the concept of utilising low cost equipment (often IBM PCs or compatibles) for applications that previously required relatively large and expensive computers. At Lancaster University Library, we have, over the last few years, developed an “integrated” library system that has been purpose‐built for our requirements. We have used the Pick Operating System, and automated our systems, starting with Acquisitions and moving to Cataloguing, OPAC, and so on. Along the way, we have included inter‐library loans, slides, serials and other associated systems.

Details

VINE, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article

Ken Harrison and David Summers

Lancaster University began a programme of retrospective catalogue conversion in 1990, initially using data from BNB on CD‐ROM, and more recently Library of Congress CDMARC…

Abstract

Lancaster University began a programme of retrospective catalogue conversion in 1990, initially using data from BNB on CD‐ROM, and more recently Library of Congress CDMARC Bibliographic. Records are downloaded in custom format (rather than MARC), and inhouse programs convert the data to the Lancaster catalogue format, and update the catalogue and related indexes. The proportion of library stock in full machine‐readable form has increased from 30 per cent in December 1990 to 72 per cent in July 1994. This article reports on technical details of the procedure, and implications in terms of staffing arrangements, work patterns, success rates, costs, and quality considerations.

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Program, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article

Ken Harrison and David Summers

As a consequence of both limited funding and a desire to remain independent of any single supplier, the University of Lancaster Library is developing an integrated library…

Abstract

As a consequence of both limited funding and a desire to remain independent of any single supplier, the University of Lancaster Library is developing an integrated library package with software based on the Pick operating system. The first stage in the library's automation programme, an acquisitions system, went live in April 1987. This article presents an account of its implementation, and shows how wide participation in its development has resulted in various refinements and in swift acceptance by all levels of staff. A full description of the system is given, showing the day‐to‐day procedures involved and the unlimited enquiry potential provided by the Pick access language. The system is judged a great success, both on its own merits and as the First stage in the library's continuing automation programme.

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Program, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article

Ken Harrison and Winifred R. Clark

The LANSLIDE slide management system developed by the University of Lancaster Library is a multi‐user, stand‐alone system designed for operation on an IBM PC‐AT (or…

Abstract

The LANSLIDE slide management system developed by the University of Lancaster Library is a multi‐user, stand‐alone system designed for operation on an IBM PC‐AT (or compatible) which is capable of running under the Pick operating system. LANSLIDE provides facilities for slide cataloguing with access to the records by keyword searching. Search facilities are enhanced by boolean AND/OR/NOT combinations and through the option of truncated keywords. Mini‐labels containing captions are produced by the system for fixing to the mounts of 35mm transparencies.

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Program, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article

Bill Richardson, Sonny Nwankwo and Susan Richardson

Addresses the issue of business failure. Identifies different types ofbusiness failure and provides a framework for further research into thisaspect of strategic…

Abstract

Addresses the issue of business failure. Identifies different types of business failure and provides a framework for further research into this aspect of strategic management. Draws from the management literature to describe the causes and processes of each of the failure contexts covered and provides case illustrations to contextualize them.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Vanessa Quintal and Ian Phau

This study aims to examine whether movies are pivotal in developing empathy, nostalgia, perceived risk, place familiarity and place image that can shape viewer attitude…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether movies are pivotal in developing empathy, nostalgia, perceived risk, place familiarity and place image that can shape viewer attitude towards and intention to visit a place.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from two sample frames of patrons at a large cinema chain located in a major shopping centre in Perth, Western Australia. The experimental group watched the romantic comedy, Friends with Benefits. The control group watched the romantic comedy, Desi Boyz which is set in London and India and is not associated with New York. A quota for data collection was set at 230 subjects in each group. The two groups watched their movies concurrently in different theatres at the same cinema chain in the same shopping centre. Subjects in both groups were asked for their responses to New York immediately after viewing the movie.

Findings

In an experimental study, subjects who watched a romantic comedy set in New York had significantly higher empathy, place familiarity, attitude towards and intention to visit New York and significantly lower performance/financial risk associated with visiting New York than the control group. However, perceived risk played no significant role in influencing place familiarity in the experimental group, whereas nostalgia played no significant role in influencing place familiarity in the control group.

Originality/value

The proposed decision-making framework provides academics with theoretical underpinning for future empirical tourism studies in the research area. The findings also encourage more collaboration between government, movie producers, destination management organisations and marketers to deliver a movie that provides consistent branding in its story, location and product placement strategies.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 70 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Book part

Jon S. T. Quah

Chapters 2–6 have dealt in turn with how Denmark, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and Singapore have been effective in curbing corruption, as manifested in their rankings…

Abstract

Chapters 2–6 have dealt in turn with how Denmark, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and Singapore have been effective in curbing corruption, as manifested in their rankings and scores on the five international indicators of the perceived extent of corruption. In contrast, Chapter 7 focuses on India’s ineffective anti-corruption measures and identifies the lessons which India can learn from their success in fighting corruption. The aim of this concluding chapter is twofold: to describe and compare the different paths taken by these six countries in their battle against corruption; and to identify the lessons which other countries can learn from their experiences in combating corruption. However, as the policy contexts of these six countries differ significantly, it is necessary to begin by providing an analysis of their contextual constraints before proceeding to compare their anti-corruption strategies and identifying the relevant lessons for other countries.

Details

Different Paths to Curbing Corruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-731-3

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Article

THE National Reference Library of Science and Invention may be said to be devoted to three R's— reference, research and referral. The purpose of this article is to…

Abstract

THE National Reference Library of Science and Invention may be said to be devoted to three R's— reference, research and referral. The purpose of this article is to illustrate this theme, with a picture of the services and activi‐ties of the Library, and to indicate when it can be of help to other libraries. However, it is necessary first to outline briefly the origins and present stage of development of the Library, for despite the amount of publicity it has had, the NRLSI remains relatively little known or little understood compared with the other library departments of the British Museum.

Details

New Library World, vol. 71 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

David Collins, Ian Dewing and Peter Russell

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the jurisdictional expansion of audit into the area of UK financial regulation. The paper draws on the analytical framework of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the jurisdictional expansion of audit into the area of UK financial regulation. The paper draws on the analytical framework of new audit spaces (Andon et al., 2014, 2015), which built on the concept of regulatory space (Hancher and Moran, 1989), and characterises this new audit space as regulatory work.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an intensive reading of a variety of publicly available documentary sources, the paper investigates the role of auditors and accountants in the reporting accountants’ and skilled persons’ regimes in the UK under the Banking Act 1987 and the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000.

Findings

The paper identifies a new audit space characterised as regulatory work, which is made up of three distinct phases (and suggests the recent emergence of a fourth phase), and considers the extent to which these phases of regulatory work share common themes across new audit spaces identified by Andon et al. (2015) as independence, reporting, accreditation and mediating.

Originality/value

The paper identifies a further jurisdictional expansion of audit into a new audit space, characterised as regulatory work.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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