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1 – 10 of 178
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Ian Rowlands

This paper provides a high‐level overview of some of the main research themes and preoccupations that are reported in this special ciber issue of Aslib Proceedings: New…

1606

Abstract

This paper provides a high‐level overview of some of the main research themes and preoccupations that are reported in this special ciber issue of Aslib Proceedings: New Information Perspectives. The research activities of ciber are drawn together in the quest for a better understanding of the policy implications of large‐scale knowledge production systems against the backdrop of profound technical change, uncertainty over business models, and new forms of consumer behaviour. The paper presents a series of conceptual frameworks that aim to contextualise ciber’s work in bibliometrics, cybermetrics, research evaluation, scholarly communication, user studies, publishing strategies and policy analysis. The transparency that metrics can bring to the evaluation debate and the pivotal role of human information behaviour in determining those metrics, are discussed.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 55 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Ian Rowlands

This paper introduces a new bibliometric tool, the journal diffusion factor. An argument is presented that the bibliometric indicators commonly used to measure the quality…

1903

Abstract

This paper introduces a new bibliometric tool, the journal diffusion factor. An argument is presented that the bibliometric indicators commonly used to measure the quality of research (journal impact factor, immediacy index and cited half‐life) offer little insight into the transdisciplinary reception (thus the wider influence) of journals. The journal diffusion factor describes a neglected dynamic of citation reception and is intended as a complementary partial indicator for research evaluation purposes, to be read alongside existing well‐established indicators.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Farhan Rahman, Ian Rowlands and Olaf Weber

It is becoming increasingly clear that as the pressures of climate change increase around the world, all nations must strive to lower their carbon footprint through…

Abstract

Purpose

It is becoming increasingly clear that as the pressures of climate change increase around the world, all nations must strive to lower their carbon footprint through conservation. If the growth trend of green building and infrastructure construction is to be continued and improved upon, then evidence must be collected as to the benefits they bring about, and the level of support they enjoy in the market. The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the economic performance of green buildings by evaluating whether LEED for Homes and BOMA-BEST properties capture higher market valuations and lower vacancy rates. These types of research questions have not been investigated to a great deal in the Canadian context. The primary analysis concerning municipal market valuation of green buildings was conducted using robust ordinary least squares and logistic regression models. Commercial vacancy rates were compared through the use of χ2 tests. Our analysis did not lead to conclusive evidence that there exists a “green” premium in the real estate market with respect to municipal market valuations. The authors argue that this may largely be due to municipal appraisal methods that currently do not incorporate sustainability factors. As such, they may not adequately reflect market tastes and trends. Furthermore, while the vacancy rates of green commercial buildings were, on the whole, lower than their non-green counterparts, the differences were not statistically significant. Given these results, the authors propose a set of research activities that the academic community should pursue.

Design/methodology/approach

Statistical techniques are utilized test whether green certification (LEED/BOMA-BEST) leads to higher municipal valuation for both commercial and residential green properties, using regression analysis. Furthermore, χ2 tests are conducted to evaluate whether certification leads to lower vacancy rates for commercial properties.

Findings

In terms of valuation, certification does not exert (on average) a positive role in terms of higher valuations for both commercial and residential properties. However, with respect to vacancy rates, there is a tendency towards lower vacancy rates for green properties, but the relationship is not statistically significant.

Research limitations/implications

The next set of research needs to gather greater amount of data with respect to how municipal evaluations are performed since the results are counter-intuitive. Greater tracking of the financial performance of green buildings should be conducted and made available for both public and private bodies. Particularly, rental and sale prices of green buildings need to be tracked in an organized manner.

Practical implications

The valuation techniques utilized by the municipal authorities need revision as green properties are being assessed without appropriate guidance from educational institutions. Furthermore, the limited amount of “green” valuation techniques in existence may not be applied.

Originality/value

This is the first Canadian-based research looking into the valuation of green certification using rigorous quantitative statistical techniques and original and publicly available data. Furthermore, it holds important lessons for municipal authorities with respect to green building valuation beyond Canada as the limitations of current practice go mostly likely beyond the North American context.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

472

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 66 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

215

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 68 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

David Bawden

788

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 61 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Tove Faber Frandsen

This paper shows that the measure of diffusion introduced by Ian Rowlands called the journal diffusion factor (JDF) is highly negatively correlated with the number of…

Abstract

This paper shows that the measure of diffusion introduced by Ian Rowlands called the journal diffusion factor (JDF) is highly negatively correlated with the number of citations, leading highly cited journals to get a low JDF, whereas less cited journals get a high JDF. This property reduces the utility of the JDF as a tool for evaluation of research influence. The paper presents a new definition of the JDF in order to attempt to improve it. This new JDF corrects the strong correlation with the number cited, but has a strongly statistically positive correlation with journal impact factors (JIF). However, the new JDF may still be used as an evaluation tool since, for journals with similar JIF values, the new JDF can be used to differentiate between them. Thereby, journal evaluation will be based on more than one aspect of journal influence when assessing journal influence with similar journal impact factor values.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2008

David Nicholas and Ian Rowlands

784

Abstract

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 60 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Ian Rowlands

Commentators in the library and information profession habitually voice concern about the perceived lack of a coherent and integrated set of ‘national information…

Abstract

Commentators in the library and information profession habitually voice concern about the perceived lack of a coherent and integrated set of ‘national information policies’ in the UK. These concerns are worthy but ultimately misplaced. The real problem is not our inability to come up with a nice neat package of the ‘right policies’, but our failure to think critically about the value systems that shape our perception of information policy problems in the first place. This article contributes to this new agenda by developing a concept mapping of the Field of information policy, based on term co‐occurrence data. This leads to a broader discussion about the values — rather than the specific laws and regulations — that underpin our conceptions of information policy.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 50 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Tove Faber Frandsen, Ronald Rousseau and Ian Rowlands

The purpose of this paper is to clarify earlier work on journal diffusion metrics. Classical journal indicators such as the Garfield impact factor do not measure the…

2732

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify earlier work on journal diffusion metrics. Classical journal indicators such as the Garfield impact factor do not measure the breadth of influence across the literature of a particular journal title. As a new approach to measuring research influence, the study complements these existing metrics with a series of formally described diffusion factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a publication‐citation matrix as an organising construct, the paper develops formal descriptions of two forms of diffusion metric: “relative diffusion factors” and “journal diffusion factors” in both their synchronous and diachronous forms. It also provides worked examples for selected library and information science and economics journals, plus a sample of health information papers to illustrate their construction and use.

Findings

Diffusion factors capture different aspects of the citation reception process than existing bibliometric measures. The paper shows that diffusion factors can be applied at the whole journal level or for sets of articles and that they provide a richer evidence base for citation analyses than traditional measures alone.

Research limitations/implications

The focus of this paper is on clarifying the concepts underlying diffusion factors and there is unlimited scope for further work to apply these metrics to much larger and more comprehensive data sets than has been attempted here.

Practical implications

These new tools extend the range of tools available for bibliometric, and possibly webometric, analysis. Diffusion factors might find particular application in studies where the research questions focus on the dynamic aspects of innovation and knowledge transfer.

Originality/value

This paper will be of interest to those with theoretical interests in informetric distributions as well as those interested in science policy and innovation studies.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 62 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

1 – 10 of 178