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Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Rebecca Harvey, Paul Levatino and Julie Liefeld

To utilize LGBTQ affirmative theory to inform clinical work which affords queer youth with disabilities agency and authorship in their negotiations of sexuality.

Abstract

Purpose

To utilize LGBTQ affirmative theory to inform clinical work which affords queer youth with disabilities agency and authorship in their negotiations of sexuality.

Methodology/approach

The authors use a case study to explore the use of queer affirmative theory and peer consultation to guide and evaluate an ongoing clinical case of a young gay man with cerebral palsy as he negotiates his developing sexuality amid powerful messages from media, pornography, friends, and parental influence.

Findings

This paper finds that a queer affirmative therapy model which explores themes of intersectionality, and utilizes nuanced views of sexual identity, sexual behavior, and gender identity are useful to practitioners to encourage agency and authorship for queer disabled people in their negotiations of ability, sexuality, identity, and behavior.

Originality/value

This paper provides an alternative approach to nurturing queer identity by (1) creating refuge for emerging sexualities; (2) allowing for difficult dialogues where ability, sexuality, and gender can be pragmatically discussed, performed, and negotiated; (3) tolerating the discomfort of these difficult dialogues and pushing through to nurturing the unique queerness that evolves out of these conversations; and finally (4) encouraging transformation of all participants including client and practitioners. The practitioners discuss their own transformation through the co-created dialog with each other and with the client.

Details

Gender, Sex, and Sexuality Among Contemporary Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-613-6

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Christina Swart-Opperman, Claire Barnardo and Sarah Boyd

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand why talent management is a vital component of a company’s broader strategy for long-term operational excellence; to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand why talent management is a vital component of a company’s broader strategy for long-term operational excellence; to understand the impact of generation, life stage and career stage on an employee’s professional needs, goals and expectations of their firm; to understand how organisational culture contributes, in this case, to ineffective people management practices; and to develop a talent management strategy: new policies, processes or practices that will address the identified issues and create a sustainable pipeline of talent.

Case overview/synopsis

This case finds the successful agro-processing firm Namib Mills in a state of internal tension in April 2019. As Namibia’s premier supplier of staple food products, Namib Mills is performing well in a struggling economy. Then yet, CEO Ian Collard is concerned that his senior management team is not exhibiting the kind of leadership and strategic management needed to take the company into the future. As Ian examines the issue further – with the aid of a report from an external consultant – he begins to see that the weaknesses of his senior managers, who are prone to micromanaging and poor communication, are part of a bigger issue of talent management in the firm. The junior employees, who are energetic and ready to innovate, are growing restless as they wait for career growth and promotion opportunities. The rising leaders in middle management are also struggling to break through. Ian must confront how organisational culture and generational diversity within this family-owned business have created talent management barriers and develop a strategy for sustainably developing employees into the leaders of the future.

Complexity academic level

This case is designed for a master’s level management program and is well-suited for courses that deal with organisational behaviour, people management or human resources management. Specifically, the case is aimed at students interested in talent management, generational diversity and organisational culture.

Subject code

CSS 6: Human Resource Management.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Jim Dator and Ian Yeoman

Futurist Jim Dator provides a personal insight of how he “sees” the past, present, and futures of Hawaiian tourism. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

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Abstract

Purpose

Futurist Jim Dator provides a personal insight of how he “sees” the past, present, and futures of Hawaiian tourism. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Ian Yeoman interviews one of the world's most prominent and respected futurists, Professor Jim Dator, from the Futures Research Center of the University of Hawaii at Manoa's Political Science Department.

Findings

Like a climatologist, futurists discuss long‐term futures which are very uncertain, controversial, and often frightening stories. The past tells how the present occurred. Understanding that story is essential before considering the future. The growth of tourism is a fabulous story dependent on many developments whose future is uncertain. The tourism industry may want a “more of the same” trajectory of continued economic growth but a number changes are on the horizon which Dator calls “The Unholy Trinity,” namely the end of cheap and abundant energy; a profoundly unstable environment and a dysfunctional global economic system. Dator concludes that no government now governs satisfactorily, and so the future of tourism is extremely precarious and uncertain.

Originality/value

The interview provides both insight into how tourism has evolved and foresight of what could occur in the futures. Central to the interview is Dator's identification of the Unholy Trinity, Plus One, that suggests that the future will not neither be like the present nor like the future the tourism industry has hoped for in terms of continued economic growth. The originality and value of Dator's frank views are thought provoking, going beyond present wisdom and comfort.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2016

Michael Schwalbe

If what sociologists call “social structures” are understood to be recurrent patterns of joint action, then the charge that interactionism suffers from an astructural bias…

Abstract

If what sociologists call “social structures” are understood to be recurrent patterns of joint action, then the charge that interactionism suffers from an astructural bias falls apart, because such patterns of joint action are what interactionists routinely study. The problem, then, is not that interactionism fails to grasp structure, but that much of the mainstream of sociology fails to grasp process. It is this aprocessual bias that impedes a full understanding of how inequality is created and reproduced. The case of capitalism is used to show how an interactionist focus on process can illuminate the workings of a large-scale economic system. I treat capitalism as a macro interaction order, à la Goffman, and then employ the tools of dramaturgical sociology to analyze the recurrent patterns of joint action of which capitalism consists. This form of dramaturgical analysis is applied to two fictional stories as a way to show how capitalism depends on normative and procedural rules, cognitive presuppositions, and ritual forms – all of which are typically rendered invisible by aprocessual bias. The concepts of side bets, identity stakes, and nets of accountability are developed to complete the analysis.

Details

The Astructural Bias Charge: Myth or Reality?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-036-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Ian Ball

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on competence in the management of government, with a focus on the management of public finances. I also reflect on the role public…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on competence in the management of government, with a focus on the management of public finances. I also reflect on the role public financial management (PFM) can play in addressing the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach in this paper is to document my thoughts and opinions on PFM in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

Competent bureaucrats and sound finances are the key drivers of an effective PFM system that enables and encourages decisions leading to high standards of financial performance and position.

Practical implications

Although this is purely a personal reflection on the issue covered, it may encourage other academics and practitioners to explore the idea further in various settings across the globe.

Originality/value

Having devoted my academic and professional career to the field of PFM, this personal, reflective essay considers the role of PFM systems in generating information that leads to better decisions, better financial performance and position and ultimately a greater ability to absorb shocks such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Nurdilek Dalziel, Fiona Harris and Angus Laing

The complexity of customer relationships has been recognized in the relationship marketing literature. Yet, the understanding of how this complexity impacts on the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The complexity of customer relationships has been recognized in the relationship marketing literature. Yet, the understanding of how this complexity impacts on the formation and development of different relationship forms is limited. Focusing on the development of customer‐service provider relationships in a financial services context, this paper aims to critically examine the nature and formation of business‐to‐consumer service relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methods were employed, with in‐depth interviews undertaken with a sample of UK bank customers.

Findings

The complexity of customer relationships was documented by approaching relationships as multidimensional, dynamic and contextual. A relationship typology based on four key relationship components (trust, commitment, buyer‐seller bonds, and relationship benefits) is proposed. This typology suggests that for a relationship to exist it does not necessarily have to encompass an emotional dimension. Moreover, the paper demonstrates the importance of the fit between customers' relational expectations and their experiences with service providers in developing long‐term committed relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to the UK context. The extension of this study to other sectors or financial institutions operating in different regulatory and technological environments needs to be tested.

Practical implications

It is crucial that relationships are viewed as multidimensional, taking into account various relationship components. Since different relationship components influence relationships differently, organisations need to develop different relationship marketing strategies for each consumer segment according to consumers' relational expectations.

Originality/value

Building on preceding research, this paper broadens understanding of the complexity of customer‐firm relationships by presenting insight into the affective element of relationships and highlighting the role of the fit between customers' relational expectations and their experiences in relationship development.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Julie Dona and Susan J. Ferguson

Structural factors during Chinese and Japanese immigration and settlement processes required families to adapt in ways that altered traditional gender behaviors. This…

Abstract

Structural factors during Chinese and Japanese immigration and settlement processes required families to adapt in ways that altered traditional gender behaviors. This study examines how two factors – spousal immigration order and family economic structure – affected the gendered division of labor and how gender roles consequently were reconstructed for first and second generation Chinese Americans and Japanese Americans. These issues are investigated through secondary data analysis of 21 in‐depth interviews with daughters of Chinese and Japanese immigrants on the West Coast.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Telecommunications giant Cable and Wireless adopted a three‐prong approach to slimming down its in‐house HR, which Ian Muir, vice‐president of group human resources…

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Abstract

Telecommunications giant Cable and Wireless adopted a three‐prong approach to slimming down its in‐house HR, which Ian Muir, vice‐president of group human resources, described as “too big, too expensive and with a cost base that was fixed rather than variable”. First, the company began to implement a global SAP‐based e‐HR system, making it one of the first businesses to have truly global HR processes. Second, it began to outsource some of its HR functions. And third, it concentrated on enabling the remaining in‐house HR people to focus on much more strategic work.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Executive summary
Publication date: 29 September 2022

UNITED STATES: Hurricane Ian brings Florida floods

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES273049

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Brian H. Kleiner

Devotes the entire journal issue to managing human behaviour in US industries, with examples drawn from the airline industry, trading industry, publishing industry, metal…

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Abstract

Devotes the entire journal issue to managing human behaviour in US industries, with examples drawn from the airline industry, trading industry, publishing industry, metal products industry, motor vehicle and parts industry, information technology industry, food industry, the airline industry in a turbulent environment, the automotive sales industry, and specialist retailing industry. Outlines the main features of each industry and the environment in which it is operating. Provides examples, insights and quotes from Chief Executive Officers, managers and employees on their organization’s recipe for success. Mentions the effect technology has had in some industries. Talks about skilled and semi‐skilled workers, worker empowerment and the formation of teams. Addresses also the issue of change and the training that is required to deal with it in different industry sectors. Discusses remuneration packages and incentives offered to motivate employees. Notes the importance of customers in the face of increased competition. Extracts from each industry sector the various human resource practices that companies employ to manage their employees effectively ‐ revealing that there is a wide diversity in approach and what is right for one industry sector would not work in another. Offers some advice for managers, but, overall, fails to summarize what constitutes effective means of managing human behaviour.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 22 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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