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1 – 10 of 567
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Adrian Mitchell, Ian Frame, Alan Coday and Mike Hoxley

As the construction industry strives for closer integration of the participants, more responsibility for the management of the detailed design process is being directed to main…

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Abstract

Purpose

As the construction industry strives for closer integration of the participants, more responsibility for the management of the detailed design process is being directed to main contractors and combined with their existing duties of managing the construction and pre‐construction processes. Crucially, this necessitates successful management of the interface between these processes, and this paper seeks to investigate a conceptual view of that interface to provide a foundation for improving understanding of it.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent and current literature is examined, and various theoretical backgrounds for the design and the construction processes are reviewed. The consequences for the understanding of the interface are discussed. The significance of conceptual frameworks is also reviewed.

Findings

A significant difference is identified in the published work between the theoretical understandings of the construction and design processes. From this a conceptual framework for the interface between these processes is developed.

Practical implications

The difference identified may have significant implications for further research, and for the development of management techniques applicable to the interface. Furthermore, the lack of access to specialist knowledge at the optimum time during the design process is identified as having a potentially significant impact on that process.

Originality/value

These findings could provide an understanding and basis for further research into the interface between the processes, and for the development of an enhanced model that would facilitate improved management of the interface and the optimisation of the process of the selection, appointment and input of specialist subcontractors.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Ian Mitchell

The purpose of this paper is to argue that changes in urban retail markets in the first half of the nineteenth century should be viewed as significant innovations in retailing…

474

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that changes in urban retail markets in the first half of the nineteenth century should be viewed as significant innovations in retailing methods.

Design/methodology/approach

Retail innovation is set in the context of urban growth, changing consumer demand and product availability. A brief review of the literature leads into a discussion of innovation in non‐shop retailing and of the need for markets to adapt to a changing context. Evidence from local authority archives, particularly Stockport and Birkenhead in Cheshire, is used to explore this in more detail, including the construction of purpose‐built market halls.

Findings

Markets remained pivotal to the supply of food and some other goods. They offered a familiar yet controlled and safe environment. But market halls represented a significant innovation in terms of their size and of the money and civic pride invested in them. Local context, including ownership of market rights, was important in determining how markets adapt to urban growth.

Research limitations/implications

Business records of market traders tend not to survive from this period; so, findings have to be derived from more indirect sources. The need for further research into local authority archives is indicated.

Originality/value

The first half of the nineteenth century is a relatively neglected period in recent retail history research. The paper draws attention to innovation in this period. It provides local context for innovations like market halls that are well documented at a general level, but less well researched locally.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Ian Mitchell

The property industry has undergone significant change since theearly 1980s. These changes include growing demands forprofessionalization and the recognition of the utility of…

244

Abstract

The property industry has undergone significant change since the early 1980s. These changes include growing demands for professionalization and the recognition of the utility of property as an alternative form of investment. Examines the use of citational and co‐citational analysis to investigate the development of the property discipline and to detect these types of changes within the literature. Both citational and co‐citational analysis examine the way in which authors reference publications to build a greater understanding of the body of knowledge which underwrites a discipline. Identifies seminal works and eminent authors, and four areas of specialization within the property discipline. These are income valuation methods, leasehold valuation, property investment and the use of expert systems in residential valuation. Concludes that citational and co‐citational analysis provide useful techniques to explore and document the development of the property literature. Provides a preliminary investigation and a base for future research.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1995

Stuart Jauncey, Ian Mitchell and Pamudji Slamet

Definitions of yield management vary in terms of their content andfocus. Develops a “best fit” definition of yield managementof the hotel sector by reviewing the literature in…

9642

Abstract

Definitions of yield management vary in terms of their content and focus. Develops a “best fit” definition of yield management of the hotel sector by reviewing the literature in this area and extracting the key words and central meanings used. In addition, produces a list of eight features using a comparison and analysis of the views of London‐based front office managers and features of yield management applications promoted through vendors′ sales literature. Together these eight features illustrate what an ideal yield management application would offer. While all of the applications currently for sale within the UK offer some of these features, none of them are capable of performing the complete range.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

136

Abstract

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Tom Russell

This chapter explores the concept of entitlement among school teachers and university professors in terms of long-standing characteristics of the culture of schooling. Features of…

Abstract

This chapter explores the concept of entitlement among school teachers and university professors in terms of long-standing characteristics of the culture of schooling. Features of the school culture are introduced with a short excerpt from a science lesson that illustrates how the authority of a teacher's position can be substituted for the teacher's authority of knowledge or reason. Introduction of the concept of the authority that arises from experience leads to discussion of entitlement arising from viewing teaching as a gift rather than a service. If teaching is a service, are students not entitled to a voice in their learning? To illustrate, a three-decade project to develop students' voice and responsibility in their learning is discussed. Given the unique characteristics of teaching and teacher education, the chapter closes with the suggestion that the ultimate indication of teacher entitlement may be teachers not realizing the importance of teaching their students how to learn.

Details

Understanding Excessive Teacher and Faculty Entitlement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-940-5

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Barbara F.H. Allen

The purpose of this paper is to introduce librarians, faculty, and other interested individuals to contemporary German literature in English translation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce librarians, faculty, and other interested individuals to contemporary German literature in English translation.

Design/methodology/approach

German‐language authors born in 1950 or later and listed on the Contemporary Living Authors Comprehensive List developed by the German vendor Otto Harrassowitz are searched in OCLC's WorldCat database to determine the existence of English translations. A bio‐bibliographical list is then developed featuring all contemporary German‐language authors who have achieved an English language translation of at least one of their literary works.

Findings

Of the approximately 1,400 writers on Harrassowitz's comprehensive list, a surprisingly large number of almost 80 authors of the younger generation (born in 1950 or later) have been translated into English.

Originality/value

This bio‐bibliography of contemporary German belles lettres (of the younger generation) in English translation is the first of its kind. It can be used by librarians to check their current library holdings and to expand their collections of German literature in English translation.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Ian Mitchell

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the significance and limitations of ethical shopping in Britain in the period between the 1880s and 1914 and, in particular, the use of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the significance and limitations of ethical shopping in Britain in the period between the 1880s and 1914 and, in particular, the use of white lists as a means of encouraging consumers only to buy goods produced in satisfactory working conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief survey of earlier examples of ethical shopping provides the context for a discussion of the published prospectus of the “Consumers” League’. Unpublished records of the Christian Social Union (CSU), supplemented by newspaper reports, are used to examine the rationale for white lists, their creation and effectiveness.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that, contrary to what has generally been thought, consumers’ leagues originated in Britain not the USA. The CSU was not ineffective but provided an ethical and religious rationale for consumer activism. It was also responsible for the creation of white lists in several towns and cities in Britain and promoted the concept of preferential buying. CSU activity helped shape public opinion, but sustained improvements to working conditions also required effective trade unions and government intervention.

Research limitations/implications

Relatively few CSU branch records survive and this precludes a comprehensive survey of its role in ethical shopping.

Originality/value

The British consumer movement in this period has been little studied and often dismissed. By making use of archives, particularly CSU branch records, that have generally been ignored, the paper demonstrates that ethical shopping mattered and deserves more attention. It also highlights the importance of setting this in a wider context, particularly trade unionism and co-operation.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1966

THE training model to be discussed is based on an integrated set of manual and mechanised indexing systems, all handling the same body of information from a limited subject field…

59

Abstract

THE training model to be discussed is based on an integrated set of manual and mechanised indexing systems, all handling the same body of information from a limited subject field. By extending the scope of the model's operations to include prior and subsequent activities like the selection and abstracting of the documents to be indexed, and the preparation and dissemination of material through the use of the indexes, the model may be used for a wide range of documentation training, principally at three levels: demonstration by the lecturer to the students; use by the students in the retrieval and dissemination of information; and development by the students through the selection and abstracting of documents, the indexing and storage of information and ultimately the use of feedback from the dissemination stage to improve the systems.

Details

New Library World, vol. 68 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Stefan Schwarzkopf

The purpose of this article is to introduce the theme of this special issue. In doing so, the paper argues that marketing historical research is in need of a paradigmatic shift…

1593

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to introduce the theme of this special issue. In doing so, the paper argues that marketing historical research is in need of a paradigmatic shift. Rather than privilege primary and secondary sources that preserve the perspectives and actions of corporate managers and of marketing academics, marketing historians need to open the historical narratives they construct much more than before to the experiences and voices of ordinary consumers, i.e. of those who actually shop and buy and choose. They also need to do more to incorporate into their narratives examples of the value-creation that consumers themselves enact, both inside and outside the sphere of the market.

Design/methodology/approach

By reviewing the state of the marketing historical literature, this paper introduces the “History from Below” school of historical thought into marketing historical research. It also tests to what extent a stronger consumer focus might be able to enrich historical research in marketing.

Findings

Although contemporary marketing historiography is characterized by a richness of themes and methodological approaches, there is still a marked difference between the way marketing academics and historians write the history of marketing and consumption. While, surprisingly, the former often tend to ignore the voices of ordinary consumers, the latter often lack the marketing-related “technical” knowledge to fully understand the significance of specific archival sources they discuss. This means that a genuine “People’s History of Marketing” has yet to be written.

Research limitations/implications

Findings from the paper will be of value to marketing historians who wish to expand the scope and agenda of their research and help historical research move away from narrow managerial perspectives and other “privileged” accounts of marketing.

Originality/value

This paper makes two original contributions. First, it introduces historiographical innovations associated with “History from Below” (social history) into marketing historical scholarship. Second, it attempts to help marketing historians identify alternative sets of primary and secondary sources, e.g. oral history archives, which would allow them to be much more optimistic about their own ability to reconstruct the perspectives of those whose voices are all too often ignored.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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