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1 – 10 of 18
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Camille Guérin-Marion, Ian Manion and Heather Parsons

The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for understanding the particular issues associated with leading an intergenerational workforce. It presents promising…

1187

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for understanding the particular issues associated with leading an intergenerational workforce. It presents promising strategies in the areas of talent management, decision making and internal communication to maximize the strengths and minimize the potential challenges of such a workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper blends a review of descriptive research on generational differences and commonalities in work needs and preferences together with practice-based implications for management and organizational leadership.

Findings

A conceptual framework highlights generational issues as both individual- and organizational-level variables to be considered by leaders, and proposes that intergenerational leadership should strive toward achieving a balance between meeting individual and organizational needs. Specific management activities and approaches highlight opportunities for leaders to address generational needs, while paying attention to both commonalities and differences across generations, and create a positive intergenerational work environment.

Originality/value

No clear conceptual framework or model currently exists to help understand and organize the similarities and differences in needs and preferences across generations in a workforce. The paper also offers a series of practical recommendations for organizational leadership based on the proposed framework.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2013

Ian Scott

The implicit assumption underlying the work of most anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) is that they need to change public attitudes toward corruption to ensure a cleaner future. The…

Abstract

The implicit assumption underlying the work of most anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) is that they need to change public attitudes toward corruption to ensure a cleaner future. The means of achieving this objective usually rest on sanctions, prevention, and sermons. Changing attitudes is seen to be largely a matter of prosecuting the corrupt, putting preventive measures in place, emphasizing the negative social and criminal consequences of corruption, and exhorting the public to achieve higher moral standards. Engaging the public is rarely undertaken directly. If it were, it would entail a community relations approach based on face-to-face, decentralized interaction between the ACA and the public. In principle, this approach might have three significant advantages. First, it could enable the anti-corruption message to be communicated more directly and, possibly, more effectively. Second, it might assist the ACA in identifying groups within the community which have developed, or are developing, attitudes which are potentially antithetical to its objectives. Third, it could serve as a springboard for local anti-corruption initiatives which might help to embed desired practices in the community or groups within it. In this chapter, we examine the extent to which one of the few agencies to adopt a full-blown community relations strategy – Hong Kong’s Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) – has been able to achieve those benefits.

Details

Different Paths to Curbing Corruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-731-3

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Mark A. Evans and R. Ian Campbell

This paper discusses a research programme in which the 3D computer aided industrial design geometry for a consumer product was translated into appearance models using the…

1752

Abstract

This paper discusses a research programme in which the 3D computer aided industrial design geometry for a consumer product was translated into appearance models using the contrasting techniques of workshop‐based fabrication techniques and rapid prototyping using stereolithography. The research also examined the capacity to extend the use of the rapid prototype components for the production of a fully working prototype. The ability to combine an appearance model and a working prototype into a single “appearance prototype” was a significant advance in the application of RP within industrial design.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Ian Mahoney

The purpose of this paper is to critique the role of homeless hostels in contemporary society, examining their role and legitimacy as sites of discipline and regulation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critique the role of homeless hostels in contemporary society, examining their role and legitimacy as sites of discipline and regulation of behaviors, ideas and aspirations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws upon in-depth qualitative interviews and supplementary observations undertaken in two homeless hostels in Stoke-on-Trent.

Findings

The research finds that even the most benign interventions enacted in homeless hostels are infused with disciplinary and regulatory techniques and suggests that the author needs to consider the legitimacy and efficacy of such approaches when seeking to understand the role of the hostel in assisting residents in (re)developing their autonomy.

Research limitations/implications

While there are legitimate reasons for the deployment of such techniques in some cases, legitimacy can be undermined where expectations go unmet or where developing residents’ and service user’s needs are not necessarily the main object of the interventions.

Practical implications

Hostel providers need to consider the ethicality and legitimacy of the interventions in place when seeking to help service users and residents to (re)develop their autonomy and ensure that efforts are focused in an effective and meaningful way.

Social implications

Homeless people are among the most vulnerable and excluded in society. The paper seeks to draw attention to the disciplinary and regulatory techniques to which they are subject in order to ensure that approaches employed to support homeless individuals have a clear, ethical and legitimate basis.

Originality/value

The research draws upon original data collected as part of a doctoral research project into wider experiences of unemployment.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 39 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Different Paths to Curbing Corruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-731-3

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Ian Hylan and Keith Postlethwaite

This article describes a pilot mentoring scheme, Raising Pupil Achievement (RPA), that has been developed in a girls’ secondary school. The principal aim of this scheme was to…

1315

Abstract

This article describes a pilot mentoring scheme, Raising Pupil Achievement (RPA), that has been developed in a girls’ secondary school. The principal aim of this scheme was to raise the standard of achievement of the students involved. The scheme was based on regular mentorship interviews between pupils and teachers. The interviews had an explicitly academic focus. There are similarities with what has been called “academic tutoring”. In this pilot project, mentorship was provided for pupils in Years 7 and 12. The article includes an evaluation of the pilot project that involves statistical analysis of the value added by mentoring and sampling of the views of all participants. Suggestions for further research are made together with examples of successful practice. Pupils at the school routinely gain good examination results. However, the evaluation has found an increase in motivation to learn for all mentored pupils and a measurable increase in attainment for some ages and ability groups.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2011

Jon S.T. Quah

In late April 1973, Charles P. Sutcliffe, the Commissioner of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force (RHKPF), received confidential information that Chief Superintendent Peter F…

Abstract

In late April 1973, Charles P. Sutcliffe, the Commissioner of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force (RHKPF), received confidential information that Chief Superintendent Peter F. Godber, Deputy District Police Commander for Kowloon, was remitting money abroad. This information was transmitted to James J. E. Morrin, the Director of the Anti-Corruption Office (ACO), for investigation. By the end of May 1973, investigations by the ACO officers revealed that Godber had deposited in Hong Kong banks or remitted overseas HK$650,000 (US$128,332) since 1968 (Blair-Kerr, 1973a, pp. 3–4).

Details

Curbing Corruption in Asian Countries: An Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-819-0

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Ian Hipkin

Catastrophic failures in high-reliability installations result from technical and human factors. The purpose of this paper is to use reports of the BP Texas refinery accident and…

Abstract

Purpose

Catastrophic failures in high-reliability installations result from technical and human factors. The purpose of this paper is to use reports of the BP Texas refinery accident and the UK Buncefield oil storage explosions as the basis for exploring how protection and safety are managed in high-reliability manufacturing organisations in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 21 high-reliability firms was undertaken to establish how firms perceived their safety and protection systems in relation to the findings of the Buncefield and BP Texas accidents. Interviews were held with staff in two firms.

Findings

The study identifies technical and behavioural shortcomings in managing safety and protective systems in manufacturing organisations. There are profound differences in perceptions of managers, supervisors and operators regarding a number of safety-related factors. Firms fail to identify all protective systems. Essential failure data for determining appropriate policies for failure finding are not collected.

Research limitations/implications

Quantitative results are based on a relatively small sample and qualitative perspectives derive from two case studies.

Practical implications

Managers are unsure how protective devices should be managed. The paper highlights areas where significant improvements are essential if the South African firms are to meet developed world standards.

Social implications

High-reliability organisations are obliged to minimise the possibility of serious incidents whose consequences may extend far beyond the physical bounds of the organisation.

Originality/value

Limited research has been published on the management of protective systems. This paper highlights a number of technical and behavioural issues that should be addressed for safe operation of high-reliability manufacturing organisations.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Louise Valentine, Ian Fillis and Georgina Follett

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of a research and development programme on improving craft practice through the provision of mentoring by academic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of a research and development programme on improving craft practice through the provision of mentoring by academic practitioners, studio space and advice on marketing techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an initial focus group investigation of issues which impinge on contemporary craft practice, recipients of a bursary associated with the research and development programme were assessed with respect to how their craft and marketing competencies have developed.

Findings

Practitioners can now reflect on their skills, experiment with techniques and consider the effectiveness of their approach and attitude towards marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The programme only extends to practitioners working with one art and design institution but has implications for those concerned with creative practice elsewhere.

Practical implications

There is wider potential to reinvigorate artistic and marketing practice across the creative and cultural industries, and the small and medium enterprise community in general.

Originality/value

This is a novel programme which challenges experienced practitioners to extend their creative abilities in craft and approaches to marketing.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

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