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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Matthew Fearns-Davies, Tsutomu Kubota, Fumina Tachibana, Yuko Kato and Ian Davies

This paper describes and discusses collaboration between history teachers in England and Japan. The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways in which history is taught…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes and discusses collaboration between history teachers in England and Japan. The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways in which history is taught in each country as a part of a general commitment to international collaboration and as a means by which we could explore the connection between history education and global citizenship education.

Design/methodology/approach

The teachers created two lessons (one from England and one from Japan) about the Russian revolution. Both lessons were taught in each country. Data were gathered from students and teachers to aid reflections on the nature and outcome of the collaboration.

Findings

The collaboration was very positive. Teachers and students were excited to work together and to experience different ways of learning about the past. There were different approaches to the ways in which knowledge was characterized in each country (teachers in England emphasizing contextually based historical interpretations; teachers in Japan emphasizing content and contextual knowledge).

Originality/value

This work contributes to the limited amount of research that is currently available about professional collaboration between high school teachers and students of history in Japan and England. The arguments that are made about the opportunities for international collaboration in the context of different characterizations of pedagogical content knowledge contribute to a relatively unexplored field. The authors contribute to our understandings of the relationship between history education and global citizenship education.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Ian Davies-Abbott, Catrin Hedd Jones and Gill Windle

This paper aims to understand the lived experience of a person living with dementia in a care home during the COVID-19 pandemic. It responds to the absence in research of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the lived experience of a person living with dementia in a care home during the COVID-19 pandemic. It responds to the absence in research of the voices of people with dementia living in care homes during the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a single case study design applied thematic analysis to semi-structured interview data to discover the experiences of one person living with dementia in a care home during a period of lockdown.

Findings

Five themes reveal how the participant responded to the practical and emotional challenges of the pandemic: autonomy; fears; keeping connected; keeping safe and other people living with dementia. These themes highlight the participant’s ability to adapt, accept and dispute lockdown restrictions, revealing considerable insight into their situation.

Research limitations/implications

The pandemic has restricted access to care homes, which informed the single case study design. This approach to the research may restrict the generalisability of the findings. Other researchers are encouraged to include the voices of people with dementia living in care homes in further studies.

Practical implications

Implications for practice, presented in this paper, promote quality psychosocial approaches when health-care workers engage with people living with dementia during periods of restricted activity.

Originality/value

Unlike other studies about the impact of the pandemic on care homes, this paper explores the experience of the pandemic in care homes from the perspective of a person living with dementia.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Dwight R. Merunka and Robert A. Peterson

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Annette Davies, Ian Kirkpatrick and Nick Oliver

This paper will investigate some of the theoretical and methodological problems associated with the way ‘culture’ is defined and studied in organizational settings. In…

Abstract

This paper will investigate some of the theoretical and methodological problems associated with the way ‘culture’ is defined and studied in organizational settings. In short we raise the fundamental question of how culture is understood and explained, i.e., how does one actually ‘discover’ the culture of an organization? The paper will consider these issues in the context of research conducted by the authors on organizational mergers in which culture is defined as a network of communication rules/norms.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 15 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Laurie Mullins and Ian Davies

The nature of the hospitality industry makes particular demandsupon its managers. Studies of personality characteristics provide littlehelp in their education and…

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1296

Abstract

The nature of the hospitality industry makes particular demands upon its managers. Studies of personality characteristics provide little help in their education and development. It is more constructive to place emphasis on the balance of general attributes required of the successful manager. People are both a major resource and part of the finished product that the customer is paying for. This emphasises the importance of the social and human skills as a central focus of education and development of hotel managers.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Ian Davies and Eric K. M. Chong

– The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss current challenges for citizenship education in England.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss current challenges for citizenship education in England.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a relatively brief overview of the reasons for the introduction of citizenship education into the National Curriculum. Then, it describes the different versions (in 2002, 2008 and 2014) of the National Curriculum for citizenship. Finally, this paper draws attention to the issues that explain the reasons for the radical change in status and nature of citizenship education evidenced by the 2014 version of the subject.

Findings

Following the period 1998-2010 in which citizenship education became research informed and professionally developed, policy makers now since 2014 seem to be involved in the development of citizenship education in the National Curriculum in the form of promoting knowledge about civics, willingness to volunteer and a commitment to manage responsibly personal finances. In 2014 policy makers have confirmed the place of citizenship education in the National Curriculum but its nature, the relative lack of attention devoted to it and the growing official commitment to character education which emphasises personal morality rather than citizenship education suggests that it has lost a lot of ground. This paper argues that there are parallels between what we felt had happened at earlier points, principally, the early 1990s, when political education had been rejected in favour of a particular form of citizenship education (i.e. volunteering); and the situation in 2014 when volunteering and character education are now officially preferred.

Originality/value

This paper argues for a need to address key current challenges in citizenship education in the context of earlier development.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Fiona Gill

The successful identification and management of environmental risks remains one of the most important challenges facing mankind. The global nature of environmental risks…

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1026

Abstract

Purpose

The successful identification and management of environmental risks remains one of the most important challenges facing mankind. The global nature of environmental risks makes the assumption and practice of environmental responsibility difficult. This paper aims to examine the nature of this difficulty, arguing that although environmental responsibility remains global, it is situated and practiced at the local level.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study methodology, the paper examines three family dairy farms in Belsize, New South Wales, Australia. Repeated interviews with adult members of the farming families explored their perspectives of the past, present and future of the farm, eliciting rich narratives about relationships between farm, environment, community and individual, and the role that responsibility plays in negotiating these relationships.

Findings

Environmental responsibility is established as multi‐faceted, and negotiated between social actors as one of myriad other, competing responsibilities. Responsibility is positioned as a critical factor in the generation and maintenance of social relationships, but one which is often mobilized as a mechanism of governance. The paper argues that this can result in tension for some social actors.

Originality/value

This paper positions responsibility generally, and environmental responsibility in particular, as situated on the junction between local and global networks. This occurs as a result of the intrusion of the global into the local, and the corresponding need for individuals to act on the global stage through the medium of their local contexts. In managing the changes in behavior and identity necessary to do this successfully, responsibility is identified as one means of establishing social identity and group members, and a way of defining specific social roles.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Agnieszka Jaworowska, Toni M. Blackham, Rachel Long, Catherine Taylor, Matthew Ashton, Leonard Stevenson and Ian Glynn Davies

This paper aims to determine the nutritional profile of popular takeaway meals in the UK. Fast food has a poor nutritional profile; research has focused on the major…

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2080

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the nutritional profile of popular takeaway meals in the UK. Fast food has a poor nutritional profile; research has focused on the major catering chains, with limited data on takeaway food from independent establishments.

Design/methodology/approach

Random samples of takeaway meals were purchased from small, independent takeaway establishments. Multiple samples of 27 different takeaway meals, from Indian, Chinese, kebab, pizza and English-style establishments (n = 489), were analysed for portion size, energy, protein, carbohydrate, total fat, salt and total sugars.

Findings

Takeaway meals were inconsistent with UK dietary recommendations; pizzas revealed the highest energy content, and Chinese meals were lowest in total fat. However, there was a high degree of variability between and within categories, but the majority of meals were excessive for portion size, energy, macronutrients and salt.

Research limitations/implications

The present study focused on energy, macronutrients, salt and total sugars. Future research should analyse the quality of fat and carbohydrates and micronutrients to provide a more detailed nutritional profile of takeaway food.

Practical implications

The nutritional variability between establishments suggests that recipe reformulation should be explored in an attempt to improve the nutritional quality of takeaway foods. In addition, portion size reduction could favour both the consumer and the industry.

Social implications

Takeaway outlets do not provide nutritional information; due to the excessive nutritional profiles, regular intake may increase the risk of non-communicable disease. Therefore, there is a pressing need for this provision to help consumers make conscious food choices.

Originality/value

This is the first study to analyse energy and macronutrient content of independent takeaway meals in the UK.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Rachel Davies, Ian Mansell, Ruth Northway and Robert Jenkins

The abuse of people with learning disabilities is a significant problem. The response of the police to abuse that is actually a criminal offence is paramount. This paper…

Abstract

The abuse of people with learning disabilities is a significant problem. The response of the police to abuse that is actually a criminal offence is paramount. This paper reports on a qualitative study into the attitudes and opinions of police officers involved in abuse investigations. The aims were to understand more about the perceptions that police have about their role, the contribution made by the police to the area and to identify good practice where it occurs. Semistructured interviews and focus groups were conducted with police officers regarding their experiences of involvement in vulnerable adult protection and views on the role of the police. Findings are presented according to key themes: structure for abuse work, joint investigator training, understanding the needs of people with learning disabilities, the legislative context for abuse work and sharing good practice and striving for a consistent response. Demand is growing for the police to respond to the abuse of people with learning disabilities in a way that is both appropriate and maximises the likelihood of victims receiving justice.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Richard Webb, Ian Davies, Brian Johnson and Julie Abayomi

The increasing prevalence of obesity in the UK has been of concern for some time. This is particularly true in Liverpool and in response the Liverpool Weight Management…

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808

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing prevalence of obesity in the UK has been of concern for some time. This is particularly true in Liverpool and in response the Liverpool Weight Management Programme (LWMP) was devised. It offers a service involving dietitians and other expert agencies working towards facilitating dietary and lifestyle changes in obese NHS patients in Liverpool via a 12-week education programme. This qualitative study aims to investigate patients' experiences of the LWMP.

Design/methodology/approach

Informed volunteers participated in focus groups exploring their experiences following the programme. Focus groups were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, then analysed following a thematic approach utilising constant comparison analysis to allow a qualitative view of the LWMP to be formed.

Findings

Participants described an increase in immediate self-confidence during the LWMP, as opposed to coercion and pressure experienced elsewhere. The results also show the implementation of dietary changes by participants and favourable opinions towards both the group settings and patient-centred care. Participants also positively described the LWMP regarding the programmes social approach and aspects of programme content; however, there were issues with over-dependence on healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals also need to recognise that long-term empowerment may still be lacking and that follow-up support and the effectiveness of some areas of programme content need to be considered to ensure patients benefit from sustainable weight management.

Originality/value

This paper addresses an identified need for qualitative research in the area of health service weight management programmes and highlights the importance of long-term support in empowering patients by exploring their lived experience of the LWMP.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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