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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Michael P. Kelly and Ian A. Glover

The earliest human societies relied for their subsistence on the hunting of animals and the gathering of food. The small bands of people who lived together pursuing these…

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Abstract

The earliest human societies relied for their subsistence on the hunting of animals and the gathering of food. The small bands of people who lived together pursuing these activities appear to have been the prototype of all human organisation. Hunting and gathering was the predominant type of social organisation until perhaps 12,000 years ago. Tools and weapons were not made of metal till around 4,000 B.C., the plough was not in use until about a thousand years later, and iron tools and weapons were not used until around 1,000 B.C. (Lenski and Lenski, 1978). The history of the human race has been intextricably bound up with that of engineering when this is very broadly defined as the making of tools and other contrivances as aids and adjuncts to life. From the Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages at one end of human experience to the Steam, Jet, Atomic and Computer Ages at the other, technical‐engineering achievements have defined and delimited whatever is possible for human beings. Thus throughout the long historical transition from a predominantly agricultural to a predominantly industrial society engineers, or rather anyone whose principal activity was making and tinkering with three‐ dimensional artefacts, played a crucial role.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Ian A. Glover

Economics and economic history, general history and sociology have all usefully informed debates about the decline of the British economy relative to those of other…

Abstract

Economics and economic history, general history and sociology have all usefully informed debates about the decline of the British economy relative to those of other nations, and useful contributions have also been made by political scientists, psychologists, students of industrial relations and of management and organisational behaviour. However, the most fundamental contributions have generally come from the three major disciplines of economics (with economic history), general history and sociology. Unfortunately habits and traditions peculiar to these disciplines have sometimes been unhelpful to processes of approaching comprehensive understanding. Further, interdisciplinary discussions and controversies have sometimes produced a certain amount of ‘noise’, even on some occasions where agreement on substantive points has been considerable.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Wendy L. Currie, Ian A. Glover and Paul J. Tracey

This paper will offer answers or partial answers to the following three questions. How important should manufacturing be for the United Kingdom (UK)? If it is relatively…

Abstract

This paper will offer answers or partial answers to the following three questions. How important should manufacturing be for the United Kingdom (UK)? If it is relatively important, and if the UK fails to satisfy its own expectations regarding manufacturing performance, why is this the case? And what, if anything, should be done about it?

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Management Research News, vol. 20 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Ian A. Glover and Michael P. Kelly

Research into different British and Western European engineering traditions, and how these have influenced the formation of engineers in North America, Japan and elsewhere…

Abstract

Research into different British and Western European engineering traditions, and how these have influenced the formation of engineers in North America, Japan and elsewhere since the nineteenth century.

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Management Research News, vol. 11 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Cliff Oswick

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Employee Relations, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Ian Glover

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328

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Ian Glover

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128

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Ian Glover

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152

Abstract

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Ian Glover and Mohamed Branine

Offers a fairly general discussion of the significance of ageism in work and employment and then proceeds to suggest that labour process researchers might very usefully…

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2066

Abstract

Offers a fairly general discussion of the significance of ageism in work and employment and then proceeds to suggest that labour process researchers might very usefully pay some attention to it. Writers about the labour process tend to emphasize the issue of labour exploitation and gender and race discrimination but, to some extent, seem to overlook the problem of ageism in work and employment. In this context, considers the character of links between a number of economic and social phenomena and ageism, namely life cycles, divisions of labour, managerialism and industrialization. Specific aspects of ageism in the UK are discussed and the need for debate and policy formulation about the issue of ageism is called for.

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Personnel Review, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Ian Burt and Theresa Libby

This paper aims to examine whether increasing the salience of the internal auditor’s professional identity, defined by the expectations of their professional group…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether increasing the salience of the internal auditor’s professional identity, defined by the expectations of their professional group, increases internal auditors’ judgments of the severity of internal control concerns when their organizational identity is high.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper tests the hypothesis using a laboratory experiment with internal auditors as participants.

Findings

The results support the hypothesis that professional identity salience moderates the relation between organizational identity and the assessed severity of identified internal control weaknesses. Increasing the salience of professional identity results in a more severe assessment of identified internal control weaknesses when organizational identity is high than when it is low.

Originality/value

Prior research in the lab and in the field provides mixed results about the impact of organizational identity on internal auditors’ judgments of the severity of identified internal control concerns. This paper contributes to the discussion on this issue. In addition, the results have implications for the debate about the benefits and costs of in-house versus out-sourced internal audit functions.

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Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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