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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2022

Jackie Wales, Nicola Brewin, Iain Williamson, Jakub Štický, Rachael Lawrence and Alison Eivors

Effective transitions from child and adolescent to adult services are important for continuity of care for patients with eating disorders. This study aims to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

Effective transitions from child and adolescent to adult services are important for continuity of care for patients with eating disorders. This study aims to examine the relative importance of a series of statements about the transition process, elicited from an earlier service evaluation, from the perspectives of patients, parents/carers and clinicians.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty-eight participants completed a Q-sort task ranking 40 statements, developed from an earlier study, using a normal distribution pattern on a scale, which ranged from strongly agree to strongly disagree, to identify their priorities for transition. Analysis resulted in the extraction of four factors explaining 52% of the variance.

Findings

Four distinct factors were elicited: “parents and carers need including too”, “facilitating effective transfer between services”, “supporting the patient through transition” and providing “timely, patient-centred care”. The study enabled similarities and differences in priorities to be observed for the three respondent groups.

Practical implications

These rankings, noting the differences between the respondent groups, can be used to inform the development of effective transition protocols. This study suggests these protocols should ensure a person-centred approach; timely planning; include parents/carers; provide continuous care and have good transfer of information and sensible timing of transitions. Differences in priorities/opinions can be addressed through open communication channels.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first UK-wide study examining priorities for transition from the perspectives of patients, parents/carers and clinicians.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Iain Williamson and Kiran Spence

Presents results of an exploratory study into potential risk factors for eating disturbance amongst gay men. A community sample of 202 gay men, aged 14‐72, from across the…

1184

Abstract

Presents results of an exploratory study into potential risk factors for eating disturbance amongst gay men. A community sample of 202 gay men, aged 14‐72, from across the UK completed a battery of measures anonymously using a postal questionnaire method. The measures included the EDI‐2, the revised NHAI, and an adapted version of the Sociocultural Attitudes towards Appearance Questionnaire. The internalisation of sociocultural norms regarding the importance of slimness and attractiveness was the most powerful predictor of maladaptive eating‐related attitudes, although self‐esteem, internalised homonegativity and satisfaction with sexual orientation were also significant factors. Younger gay men demonstrated higher levels of disturbance and the strongest relationship between body‐esteem and self‐esteem. Many participants perceived the gay scene to be highly body‐conscious but measures of gay identity development and community involvement were associated with lower levels of disturbance. Concludes that health education workers with gay men should take this issue more seriously.

Details

Health Education, vol. 101 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Iain Williamson, Dawn Leeming, Steven Lyttle and Sally Johnson

Audio-diary methods are under-utilised in contemporary qualitative research. The purpose of this paper is to discuss participants and researchers’ experiences of using…

1302

Abstract

Purpose

Audio-diary methods are under-utilised in contemporary qualitative research. The purpose of this paper is to discuss participants and researchers’ experiences of using audio-diaries alongside semi-structured interviews to explore breastfeeding experiences in a short-term longitudinal study with 22 first-time mothers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide a qualitative content analysis of the participants’ feedback about their experiences of the audio-diary method and supplement this with the perspectives of the research team based on fieldwork notes, memos and team discussions. The authors pay particular attention to the ways in which the data attained from diaries compared with those from the interviews.

Findings

The diaries produced were highly heterogeneous in terms of data length and quality. Participants’ experiences with the method were varied. Some found the process therapeutic and useful for reflecting upon the development of breastfeeding skills whilst negative aspects related to lack of mobility, self-consciousness and concerns about confidentiality. Researchers were positive about the audio-diary method but raised certain ethical, epistemological and methodological concerns. These include debates around the use of prompts, appropriate support for participants and the potential of the method to influence the behaviour under scrutiny. Interview and diary accounts contrasted and complemented in ways which typically enriched data analysis.

Practical implications

The authors conclude that audio-diaries are a flexible and useful tool for qualitative research especially within critical realist and phenomenological paradigms.

Originality/value

This appears to be the first paper to evaluate both participants and researchers’ experiences of using audio-diaries in a detailed and systematic fashion.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Kieran Taylor, David J. Edwards, Joseph H.K. Lai, Iain Rillie, Wellington Didibhuku Thwala and Mark Shelbourn

This study aims to develop a decision-making tool that assesses the economic feasibility of converting commercial and industrial buildings into rented residential…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a decision-making tool that assesses the economic feasibility of converting commercial and industrial buildings into rented residential accommodation. This tool also enables developers to provide high-quality rented residential accommodation that contribute to the gentrification of formerly industrialised inner city or developed areas.

Design/methodology/approach

The overarching epistemological approach adopted used inductive reasoning and a postpositivist philosophical design to structure the research problem and devise new theories about the phenomena under investigation. From an operational perspective, a two-phase “waterfall” research approach was adopted. Phase one used extant literature to identify development factors and variables for consideration, risks posed and conversion appraisal criteria. Two case studies formed the basis of a cross comparative analysis, namely, a new build and conversion of a former industrial building into rented residential accommodation. Phase two identified development appraisal criteria, conducted a cost analysis and premised upon the findings, developed a decision support appraisal tool as a “proof of concept”.

Findings

The research combined key decision factors and variables that assist property developers when evaluating whether to convert commercial and industrial property into rented residential accommodation. The appraisal tool’s functionality was validated via a focus group discussion with senior property developers to ensure that assessment criteria and development weightings were appropriate. Feedback revealed that the tool was suitable for purpose and should now be adopted in practice and refined as appropriate and with usage.

Research limitations/implications

The appraisal tool presented could yield a far more accurate means of decision-making which, in turn, could ensure that predicted investment returns are received (thus reducing errors and lowering risk for investors). Future work is required to robustly test and validate the tool’s accuracy in practice. It is envisaged that future projects will provide a rich stream of data for such testing.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this work constitutes the first attempt to conceptualise a decision support tool for rented residential property development.

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Nilanjan Basu and Orlin Dimitrov

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of the passage of the Sarbanes‐Oxley Act (SOX) on a number of governance and governance‐related characteristics, such as…

1286

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of the passage of the Sarbanes‐Oxley Act (SOX) on a number of governance and governance‐related characteristics, such as board structure and committee composition, as well as the effect of those changes (if any) on both accounting performance and company value.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper derives its results using a series of statistical analyses performed on the universe of firms comprising the S&P 500 index. To better gauge the effect of governance changes on firm performance, it uses four different performance measures.

Findings

The paper finds that as a direct consequence of the passage of SOX, the fraction of outsiders on corporate boards and all major board committees has gone up significantly. In addition, total chief executive officer compensation relative to sales as well as the amount of illegal insider trading (measured by a proxy based on the abnormal profits derived from insider trades) have declined. Finally, board size has declined marginally. None of these changes, however, is associated with any improvement in corporate performance or value.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the brewing debate on the usefulness of SOX regulations. It examines several performance and governance‐related variables that have been previously overlooked. In addition, unlike most previous studies that look at the effect of SOX on governance, or valuation, the paper controls for the incremental effect of stock exchange regulations.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Iain Robertson

The purpose of this paper is to define and characterise the precise nature of these cultural systems and their resulting impact on the respective art and artists of each…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define and characterise the precise nature of these cultural systems and their resulting impact on the respective art and artists of each territory, by ascertaining the impact on those systems of their respective government and governance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on three approaches to art market modelling. All three are based on political ideologies. The first, which typifies the art markets of Western Europe and the USA, is predicated on a Pluralist and Neo-Liberal ideology. The others correspond to the systems of government in China, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan.

Findings

It has been shown in this paper that political systems and their accompanying ideology, born of cultural preferences, have impacted on the art markets of China, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan. It has been demonstrated that all four markets are employing variants of the international norm.

Research limitations/implications

The art that is exported from East Asia will only be accepted by East Asian national markets when East Asian art markets exercise a majority influence on emerging and transitional markets. It is not the intention of this paper to pursue this thought beyond the possibility that it may occur.

Practical implications

The ineluctable conclusion is, therefore, that the global art market is moving towards a bipolar affair.

Social implications

This paper also suggests the disengagement of East Asian and Chinese “culture” and art from a global (western) norm and production and consumption of national culture in East Asia by East Asians.

Originality/value

The paper looks (for the first time) at the direct (and subliminal) influence of political systems on art markets and the consequential effects of political ideology on the art markets of East Asia and China. The paper arrives at a series of precise definitions for the way that these art markets operate.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Iain Haysom and Kay Sharp

In this study a simple meal was prepared from raw chicken and lettuce in a manner which incorporated examples of common food hygiene malpractice. Prior to meal…

1303

Abstract

In this study a simple meal was prepared from raw chicken and lettuce in a manner which incorporated examples of common food hygiene malpractice. Prior to meal preparation, the chicken was inoculated with varying levels of Salmonella Typhimurium. The spread of microbial contamination (total viable counts, Enterobacteraceae counts and the presence of Salmonella species) from the chicken to sites in the kitchen was traced. Results indicate how easily bacterial contaminants from food may be spread around a kitchen. Levels of contamination on foods ready for consumption and in areas considered clean after washing up and wiping surfaces are established. These indicate that contaminants are unlikely to be removed from some sites unless cleaning procedures are rigorous.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Jonathan Parker and Kelly Veasey

This paper aims to explore Joint couple payments under Universal Credit which tend to privilege male partners. This may entrap women in abusive relationships, foster…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore Joint couple payments under Universal Credit which tend to privilege male partners. This may entrap women in abusive relationships, foster poverty which are indicative of gendered structural abuse.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a critical review of the literature and qualitative interviews with third sector support workers, the authors explore the impacts that Universal Credit has on women, especially those in abusive partnerships.

Findings

Current welfare processes reinforce patriarchal assumptions and are indicative of the structural abuse of women. This has increased during the lockdowns imposed to tackle COVID-19.

Practical implications

Changes are needed in the ways in which welfare benefits are disbursed. Gendered structural abuses should be explicitly considered when working with women who experience domestic violence and abuse.

Originality/value

This paper argues that there needs to be a wider a recognition of gender power relations and the concept of structural abuse in policy formation and implementation.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Nicos Komninos, Bernard Musyck and Alasdair Iain Reid

The purpose of this paper is to assess how national and regional authorities in south-east Europe in a period of crisis perceive and set in motion research and innovation…

1531

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess how national and regional authorities in south-east Europe in a period of crisis perceive and set in motion research and innovation strategies for smart specialisation (RIS3) and the options that these strategies offer to overcome the current fiscal and development crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper starts with a literature review on the guiding principles of smart specialisation strategies and the differences from previous rounds of regional innovation strategies. Evidence on smart specialisation efforts is provided by cases studies in Greece, Slovenia, and Cyprus, focusing on the elaboration of such strategies in three countries with precarious innovation systems under severe conditions of crisis. The case studies are organised around key aspects of the smart specialisation logic, such as the selection of specialisation priorities, bottom-up governance, private sector leadership, and engines of innovation and competitiveness.

Findings

The paper explores the obstacles encountered in running effective RIS strategies under crisis conditions. The paper highlights the main challenges to address, such as the readiness and credibility of public authorities to design and implement sound RIS3 strategies, the willingness of companies to be involved in strategic planning, the availability of private investment funds, innovation and diversification during a crisis, and the drivers of specialisation that could lead to competitiveness and growth. In the conclusions the paper identifies three routes towards smarter productive diversification and five critical stages in the entrepreneurial discovery process.

Originality/value

The paper has both practical and theoretical significance. It focuses on the main challenges of smart specialisation and offers guidance in the elaboration of RIS3 in peripheral EU economies. On the other hand, it proposes a model for the entrepreneurial discovery process, based on the assessment of areas and futures of productivity and added-value increase, as productive diversification and crisis exit route.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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