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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Larry Levine and Betsy McClain

Regardless of how they are budgeted, information technology (IT) costs must be paid. Most schools offer some computing services at no cost to the individual or unit and…

Abstract

Regardless of how they are budgeted, information technology (IT) costs must be paid. Most schools offer some computing services at no cost to the individual or unit and some that are charged back to users and units. Typically, common good services are centrally funded, and services that differentially benefit specific individuals or units are charged for. How services are funded often reflects a school’s philosophy about IT and about finances. Preferably, IT funding mechanisms deliberately help shape and influence an institution’s IT and services philosophy, as opposed to an IT or service philosophy being unintentionally shaped by fiscal policies that follow no particular strategy. Levying fees to users on an individual or departmental basis may yield a different demand and expectation of IT services than when costs are borne by a central budget. Quantity and quality, degree of centralization, and administrative complexity of services are major variables in determining funding. Also at stake is the degree to which an institution wishes to endorse, suppress, control or expand IT services. These issues are specifically illustrated through a case study of the formulation of a new budget and cost accounting model to both finance an institution‐wide network upgrade and to maintain that network.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Ashwin J. Baliga, Vaibhav Chawla, Vijaya Sunder M. and Rajesh Kumar

To address service failure issues, scholars have recognized several service recovery (SR) mechanisms. However, there exist many barriers that retard an effective SR…

Abstract

Purpose

To address service failure issues, scholars have recognized several service recovery (SR) mechanisms. However, there exist many barriers that retard an effective SR process, and those often lead to negative consequences. Although this is a generic problem applicable across markets, it becomes critical in B2B markets, as they deal with high impact and corporate customers. The purpose of this paper is to identify these SR barriers in B2B markets and explore their linkages toward identifying the key driving barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

A four-phased methodology to address this call in the IT services industry was used. First, the identification phase led to the selection of 27 barriers based on literature. Second, in the prioritization phase, 12 salient barriers were prioritized with the help of an expert panel. Third, in the modelling phase, the total interpretive structural modelling (TISM) technique was used to examine the mutual influences among these barriers toward modelling their linkages using a digraph. Finally, in the classification phase, these barriers were graphically plotted and classified into four quadrants based on their dependence and driving powers by using Matriced Impacts Croisés Multiplication Appliquée á un Classement (MICMAC) analysis.

Findings

Two strategic barriers, namely, technology obsolescence and poor top management commitment, presented the strongest challenges against effective SR, as they were least dependent on other barriers and exerted strong influence over the operational barriers to executing SR.

Practical implications

Because the strategic level barriers, exerting strong influence against effective SR, arise from the strategic choices of board and the C-suite, this paper helps them anticipate the recovery-related after effects of their choices, thus helping them in making better decisions.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to research as it is first of its kind to explore and link SR barriers in B2B markets.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 8 December 2016

John Robinson

This is a case study on the opportunities provided by Open Source library systems and the experience of delivering these systems through a shared service.

Abstract

Purpose

This is a case study on the opportunities provided by Open Source library systems and the experience of delivering these systems through a shared service.

Methodology/approach

This chapter derives from desk research, interviews, and direct involvement in the project. The format is a case study, setting out a detailed timeline of events with information that can be applied in other settings.

Findings

This chapter presents reflections on the value and limitations of collaboration amongst libraries and librarians on an innovative approach to library systems and technologies. It also presents reflections on lessons learned from the processes and detailed discussion of the success factors for shared services and the reasons why such initiatives may not result in the outcomes predicted at the start.

Practical implications

Libraries and IT services considering Open Source and shared service approaches to provision will find material in this study useful when planning their projects.

Social implications

The nature of collaboration and collaborative working is studied and observations made about the way that outcomes cannot always be predicted or controlled. In a genuine collaboration, the outcome is determined by the interactions between the partners and is unique to the specifics of that collaboration.

Originality/value

The case study derives from interviews, written material and direct observation not generally in the public domain, providing a strong insider’s view of the activity.

Details

Innovation in Libraries and Information Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-730-1

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2005

Lilia Pavlovsky

It has been suggested that “space and artifacts constitute systems of communication which organizations build up within themselves” (Gagliardi, 1992a, b, p. vi) and…

Abstract

It has been suggested that “space and artifacts constitute systems of communication which organizations build up within themselves” (Gagliardi, 1992a, b, p. vi) and reflect the cultural life within that organization. This is a study of how the “landscape” of a public library (“Library X”), as an information retrieval system, relates to the values of the people who created it. The efforts here are geared towards understanding the physical instantiation of institutional culture and, more specifically, institutional values as they are reflected through the artifact.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-338-9

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Book part
Publication date: 6 March 2019

Beverly Weed-Schertzer

Abstract

Details

Delivering ITSM for Business Maturity: A Practical Framework
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-251-1

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Abdelkebir Sahid, Yassine Maleh and Mustapha Belaissaoui

In order to support transformational business change, IT needs to streamline the process of bringing new IT processes to life.In today’s ever-changing business world…

Abstract

In order to support transformational business change, IT needs to streamline the process of bringing new IT processes to life.

In today’s ever-changing business world, nobody knows what is around the corner, so improving agility is the best way to the future-proof organization.

IT Service Management is the ability to collect data, analyze it, to make reports, and to implement improvements in agile mode, sometimes make it challenging to manage all these informational organization assets effectively. To perform real-time monitoring of these activities, manage, and be able to involve the final user in the heart of the IT process, or reduce operating cost, agility is the ideal solution.

In this chapter, the authors propose a global strategic model to improve Information Technology Service Management service management processes with the additions of two drivers: agility management and security management.

Details

Strategic Information System Agility: From Theory to Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-811-8

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Abstract

Details

Servitization Strategy and Managerial Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-845-1

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Abstract

Details

Servitization Strategy and Managerial Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-845-1

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Book part
Publication date: 6 March 2019

Beverly Weed-Schertzer

Abstract

Details

Delivering ITSM for Business Maturity: A Practical Framework
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-251-1

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Omar Ali, Anup Shrestha, Valmira Osmanaj and Shahnawaz Muhammed

The significance of cloud services in information technology (IT) is increasing as a means of achieving enhanced productivity, efficiency and cost reduction. Through…

Abstract

Purpose

The significance of cloud services in information technology (IT) is increasing as a means of achieving enhanced productivity, efficiency and cost reduction. Through cloud-based service, the reliability and scalability of an organization’s systems can be enhanced since organizations such as local governments are able to concentrate on their main business strategies. This research seeks to identify critical factors that may have an impact on the acceptance of cloud-based services, where the organizational context is based on local governments in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

To formulate a more comprehensive IT innovation adoption model for cloud technology, factors from the technology-organizational-environment framework, desires framework and diffusion of innovation model were integrated. Data was obtained from 480 IT staff working in 47 local government organizations.

Findings

The research results show that the factors which had a statistically significant and positive impact on the adoption of cloud-based services in local governments were compatibility, complexity, cost, security concerns, expected benefits and organization size. It is likely that the outcomes from this research will provide insights to any organization seeking to make investment decisions on the adoption of cloud-based services.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include generalizability of the findings since the data is restricted to local government areas in Queensland, Australia. Further, the sample mostly included individuals with managerial positions and may not completely capture the cloud adoption factors relevant for front line IT employees. Another limitation is the possible omission of factors that may be relevant but not considered due to the selected theories. Lastly, this research did not differentiate between different types of cloud adoption such as private, public, community and hybrid models that are possible in this context.

Originality/value

The paper provides a combination framework of cloud-based service adoption based on a literature review on cloud adoption from an IS perspective. It adapts integrated model to establish a more comprehensive innovation adoption framework for cloud technology.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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