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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Cliff Ferguson

Trade unions are the political arm of the working class, economically active masses, whilst industrial action is a demonstration of the will to reach their objectives…

Abstract

Purpose

Trade unions are the political arm of the working class, economically active masses, whilst industrial action is a demonstration of the will to reach their objectives. However, the crippling of systems through such contradicts business continuity. Yet, the opposite is true for a natural disaster that traumatises the union member and has a direct impact on their well-being. Inculcating a service continuity and resilience in government, with trade unions as majority stakeholders, may be a challenge. Moreover, it is further complicated by the African perspective, which will become prevalent in the author’s deliberations, as the trade union landscape is open to revolutionary Marxism, Socialism and Capitalistic precepts and concepts. Testing the problem and solutions with the period model produces evidence that purports a future praxis for business continuity management (BCM) that involves trade union representatives and their members. Ultimately, trade unions, cumbersome as they may seem, have much to offer as far as human resources, mass membership, knowledge and skill are concerned. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

An action learning approach linked to the period model to answer five research questions, namely: What is the actual modus operandi of trade unions with regard to business continuity and resilience?; What is the actual interest of union representatives in the understanding and implementation of BCM and resilience standards and concepts?; What would be required to utilise trade union platforms for the purposes of BC induction and awareness?; How will BCM certification for trade union stewards affect or impact on their industrial actions or campaigns?; How can the BCM fora develop a theory and possible praxis, to involve trade unions as part of the business continuity and resilience programme of an organisation?

Findings

The findings are as follows: the period model works as an agent of action learning. The likelihood of trade unions to participate in business continuity outside of labour action is commendable. Trade union representatives are keen on being certified as BCM practitioners. BCPs are inclined to fail with industrial action when involving trade union representatives. The BCM Policy and ISO 22301 standards bring about a good understanding of the roles of BC practitioners and union representatives in a crisis period.

Research limitations/implications

Research was limited to the pilot site, i.e. The Government Pensions Administration Agency – South Africa.

Originality/value

The paper brings about a new dimension to a business continuity programme, where the trade unions are no longer an interested party but rather they become active members of a business continuity team.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Ihab Hanna Sawalha

This is an exploratory study that aims to explore the use (practice) of business continuity management (BCM) and the effectiveness of the BCM approach adopted by…

Abstract

Purpose

This is an exploratory study that aims to explore the use (practice) of business continuity management (BCM) and the effectiveness of the BCM approach adopted by organizations from a variety of sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of this study consisted of 250 organizations from a variety of sectors: 80 industrial; 15 banking; 25 insurance; 130 services organizations. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data.

Findings

The findings indicated that there is an increased awareness about the use of BCM across different sectors including the industrial, service, banking and insurance and that the current use of BCM is irrespective of a number of organizational characteristics.

Practical implications

This research investigates the current use/practice of BCM across a variety of sectors. It is therefore considered a significant preliminary study that paves the way for further future research studies related to the use of BCM in the Middle East. It also clarifies the current levels of application of BCM which subsequently facilitates and supports the wider adoption of BCM and commitment to adopt the best practices related to it across different sectors.

Originality/value

To the best of author's knowledge, this is one of very few studies which focus on the use/practice of BCM and approach’s effectiveness that have been conducted in the Middle East and in Jordan in particular. It reveals the extent to which BCM is being adopted across the various sectors which in turn reflects the levels of understanding and awareness of the significance of this process for today's organizations and for the continuity of their critical business functions during the occurrence of different sorts of disruptive incidents.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Manuel Ferreira Rebelo, Gilberto Santos and Rui Silva

The purpose of this paper is to propose a generic model of Integrated Management System of Quality, Environment and Safety (IMS-QES) that can be adapted and progressively…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a generic model of Integrated Management System of Quality, Environment and Safety (IMS-QES) that can be adapted and progressively to assimilate various Management Systems, of which highlights: ISO 9001 for Quality; ISO 14001 for Environment; OHSAS 18001 for Occupational Health and Safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was designed in the real environment of a Portuguese Organization and 160 employees were surveyed. The rate response was equal to 86 percent. The conceived model was implemented in a first phase for the integration of Quality, Environment and Safety Management Systems.

Findings

Among the main findings of the survey the paper highlights: the elimination of conflicts between individual systems with resources optimization; creation of added value to the business by eliminating several types of wastes; the integrated management of sustainability components in a global market; the improvement of partnerships with suppliers of goods and services; reducing the number of internal and external audits.

Originality/value

This case study is one of the first Portuguese empirical researches about IMS-QES and the paper believes that it can be useful in the creation of a Portuguese guideline for integration, namely the Quality Management Systems; Environmental Management Systems and Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems among others.

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Nijaz Bajgoric

The paper aims at defining a systemic framework for the implementation of business continuity management (BCM). The framework is based on the assertion that the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims at defining a systemic framework for the implementation of business continuity management (BCM). The framework is based on the assertion that the implementation of BCM should be done through the systemic implementation of an “always-on” enterprise information system.

Design/methodology/approach

Systems approach is used in order to design a systemic framework for the implementation of continuous computing technologies within the concept of an always-on enterprise information system.

Findings

A conceptual framework has been proposed to develop a framework for a systemic implementation of several continuous computing technologies that enhance business continuity (BC) in the form of an “always-on” enterprise information system.

Originality/value

The paper identifies BC as a business pressure in internet era and suggests a systemic framework for implementation.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Andreas Norrman and Andreas Wieland

This invited article explores current developments in supply chain risk management (SCRM) practices by revisiting the classical case of Ericsson (Norrman and Jansson…

Abstract

Purpose

This invited article explores current developments in supply chain risk management (SCRM) practices by revisiting the classical case of Ericsson (Norrman and Jansson, 2004) after 15 years, and updating its case description and analysis of its organizational structure, processes and tools for SCRM.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study is conducted with a longitudinal focus, aiming to understand both proactive and reactive SCRM practices using a holistic perspective of a real-life example.

Findings

The study demonstrates how Ericsson's SCRM practices have developed, indicating that improved functional capabilities are increasingly combined across silos and leveraged by formalized learning processes. Important enablers are IT capabilities, a fine-grained and cross-functional organization, and a focus on monitoring and compliance. Major developments in SCRM are often triggered by incidents, but also by requirements from external stakeholders and new corporate leaders actively focusing on SCRM and related activities.

Research limitations/implications

Relevant areas for future research are proposed, thereby increasing the knowledge of how companies can develop SCRM practices and capabilities further.

Practical implications

Being one of few in-depth holistic case studies of SCRM, decision-makers can learn about many practices and tools. Of special interest is the detailed description of how Ericsson reactively responded to the Fukushima incident (2011), and how it proactively engaged in monitoring and assessment activities. It is also exemplified how SCRM practices could continuously be developed to make them “stick” to the organization, even in stable times.

Originality/value

This is one of the first case studies to delve deeper into the development of SCRM practices through taking a longitudinal approach.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Ihab Hanna Sawalha

There is a noticeable confusion in the literature between Business Continuity Planning (BCP) and Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP). The two expressions are very often used…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a noticeable confusion in the literature between Business Continuity Planning (BCP) and Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP). The two expressions are very often used interchangeably especially when it comes to their application. In this paper, the differences between business continuity and disaster recovery are discussed. The disaster management cycle is also addressed in order to highlight the importance of having plans before, during and after the occurrence of an incident.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the extant literature on business continuity and disaster recovery was made. A number of different views were then presented in order to provide a better understanding of the two concepts and their potential overlap/connection. The literature review was conducted in 2020 using a variety of academic resources ranging from journal articles to text books and credible Internet websites. Relevant journal articles were obtained from two primary databases: Emerald Insight and EBSCOhost. Keywords, such as DRP, continuity, disruption and BCP, were mainly used to facilitate the search for these resources and other related material.

Findings

Reviewing the literature revealed that BCP and DRP are not the same. Yet, they are used interchangeably very often in the literature. This indicates a possible relationship/overlap between the two. The relationship between BCP and DRP can be viewed from a variety of perspectives, which altogether provide a better understanding of their purposes and application.

Practical implications

On top of the need to differentiate between business continuity and disaster recovery, the widespread impact of the current COVID-19 crisis, especially on businesses and supply chains, has unfolded the necessity to deal with business disruptions in all their forms and the significance of quick and effective recovery. This research clarifies the purpose of BCP and the purpose of DRP and their role in combating impacts of disruptive incidents on businesses and organizations.

Originality/value

BCP and DRP are discussed extensively in the literature. Yet, few studies attempted to address the precise functions of the two resulting in an obvious confusion between their meaning and purpose which subsequently reduced the uniqueness of their application and the uniqueness of the application of each. Only a small minority of practitioners and academics recognise the precise differences between the two. This study aims at clarifying this misconception to a wider set of readers and interested parties.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Manuel Ferreira Rebelo, Rui Silva, Gilberto Santos and Pedro Mendes

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study regarding the deployment of a previously developed model for the integration of management systems (MSs). The case…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study regarding the deployment of a previously developed model for the integration of management systems (MSs). The case study is developed at a manufacturing site of an international enterprise. The implementation of this model in a real business environment is aimed at assessing its feasibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The presented case study takes into account different management systems standards (MSSs) progressively implemented, along the years, independently. The implementation of the model was supported by the results obtained from an investigation performed according to a structured diagnosis that was conducted to collect information related to the organizational situation of the enterprise.

Findings

The main findings are as follows: a robust integrated management system (IMS), objectively more lean, structured and manageable was found to be feasible; this study provided an holistic view of the enterprise’s global management; clarifications of job descriptions and boundaries of action and responsibilities were achieved; greater efficiency in the use of resources was attained; more coordinated management of the three pillars of sustainability – environmental, economic and social, as well as risks, providing confidence and added value to the company and interested parties was achieved.

Originality/value

This case study is pioneering in Portugal in respect to the implementation, at the level of an industrial organization, of the model previously developed for the integration of individualized MSs. The case study provides new insights regarding the implementation of IMSs including the rationalization of several resources and elimination of several types of organizational waste leveraging gains of efficiency. Due to its intrinsic characteristics, the model is able to support, progressively, new or revised MSSs according to the principles of annex SL (normative) – proposals for MSSs – of the International Organization for Standardization and the International Electrotechnical Commission, that the industrial organization can adopt beyond the current ones.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2020

Arash Azadegan, Tahir Abbas Syed, Constantin Blome and Kayhan Tajeddini

Does internal integration extend to business continuity and to managing supply chain disruptions (SCDs)? Despite the voluminous literature on supply chain integration…

Abstract

Purpose

Does internal integration extend to business continuity and to managing supply chain disruptions (SCDs)? Despite the voluminous literature on supply chain integration, evidence on its effectiveness on risk management and disruption response is scant. The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of business continuity management (BCM) and of supply chain involvement in BCM (SCiBCM) on reputational and operational damage containment in the face of SCDs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on Simons’ Levers of Control framework to explain how the involvement of supply chain in BCM affects firm capabilities in containing damages caused by major SCDs. The authors develop and test hypotheses by analyzing large-scale questionnaire responses from 448 European companies.

Findings

Results of the data analysis suggest that BCM improves reputational damage containment, whereas SCiBCM improves operational damage containment. The findings also show that the significant effects of BCM and SCiBCM on reputational and operational damage containment, respectively, were amplified for the firms facing higher supply chain vulnerability. Post-hoc analysis further reveals the complementarity effect between BCM and SCiBCM for the companies exposed to high supply chain vulnerability.

Originality/value

Evidence on the effects of BCM and its internal integration on performance is limited. This study offers empirical evidence on the topic. Also, while supply chain integration can improve information sharing and coordination, some may not fully recognize its potential benefits in addressing SCDs. This study theoretically and empirically demonstrates the role played by internal integration, in the form of SCiBCM, in improving organizational damage containment efforts.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Jorge Ayala-Cruz

The purpose of this paper is to present the implementation and testing of a modified project risk management framework that integrates PMI’s framework with Monte Carlo…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the implementation and testing of a modified project risk management framework that integrates PMI’s framework with Monte Carlo simulation to improve the effectiveness in high-tech new product development (NPD) projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The modified framework considers three bodies of knowledge: project management, risk management, and Monte Carlo simulation to produce an enhance project risk management framework. Its application is shown through a case study.

Findings

Using the integrated framework in a recent case study project and prior NPD projects measures (as benchmarks), it was shown that it could help to enhance risk responses caused by task durations and costs’ uncertainties. The framework proved to be better than segregated generic best practices and was key in providing insight to the issue of early project risk assessment.

Research limitations/implications

More experimental replications are required for enhancement effectiveness assertions of the framework, through the application of the framework to similar case studies. Furthermore, this could improve its reliability and soundness.

Practical implications

Future directions for research could include case and empirical studies that include hypothesis’s testing, and the integration of optimization procedure for improved NPD project’s planning and execution.

Originality/value

This paper outlines a way to close the gap of project risks management planning in NPD’s initiatives. It was motivated by a relatively new tendency in exploring integrated frameworks to deal with complex project risks issues.

Propósito

La investigación presenta la implementación y demostración de un esquema modificado de gestión de riesgos para proyectos que integra el esquema propuesto por el Project Management Institute (PMI) con la simulación Monte Carlo para mejorar la eficacia de proyectos de desarrollo de nuevos productos (DNP) de alta tecnología.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

El esquema modificado considera tres áreas de conocimiento: gestión de proyectos, gestión de riesgos y simulación Monte Carlo, para producir un mejor esquema de gestión de riesgos del proyecto. Su aplicación se demuestra a través de un estudio de caso.

Resultados

Utilizando el esquema integrado en un reciente estudio de caso de un proyecto y previos proyectos de DNP como puntos de referencia, se demostró que el esquema podría ayudar a mejorar las estrategias de respuestas a los riesgos causados por la incertidumbre en la duración de las tareas y costos asociado a estos proyectos. El esquema ha demostrado ser más eficiente que aquellos propuestos como mejores prácticas genéricas, proporcionando un claro entendimiento sobre el tema de la evaluación de riesgos en la fase inicial de proyectos DNP.

Limitaciones/implicaciones

Se requieren más repeticiones experimentales para mejorar la eficacia de las afirmaciones del esquema, a través de su aplicación a estudios de casos similares. Por otra parte, esto podría mejorar su confiabilidad y estabilidad.

Implicaciones prácticas

Futuras investigaciones podrían incluir estudios de casos y estudios empíricos que incluyan pruebas de hipótesis e integración de procedimientos de optimización para mejorar la planificación y ejecución de proyectos de DNP.

Originalidad/valor

El estudio describe una forma de cerrar la brecha en la planificación de gestión de riesgos de proyecto en la industria. Fue motivada por una relativamente nueva tendencia en la investigación de esquemas integrados para hacer frente a asuntos de riesgos en proyectos complejos.

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Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Raffaela Casciello, Manuel Giralt Herrero, Catherina Di Paolantonio Martorell and Diego Alcoceba Álvarez

The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how Spanish listed companies adopt formalized and integrated models of risk management during the period 2016–2018 and…

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how Spanish listed companies adopt formalized and integrated models of risk management during the period 2016–2018 and disclose them inside annual reports. Such investigation rebuilds the international regulatory and self-regulatory framework about risk management and examines the pressures and constraints influencing the adoption and implementation of ERM model in Spain. Indeed, the instability and uncertainty of the global macroeconomic context and the new threats to the corporate profitability and survival are now contributing to the development of a new dimension of risk management system more updated, dynamic and integrated. The results of the content analysis on ERM disclosure in annual reports show that Spanish listed companies are not equipped with structured and integrated risk management systems and their risk management approach is not aligned with any ERM framework. Notwithstanding, the Spanish companies are taking remarkable steps to strengthen the risk management systems towards a higher level of integration and systematization.

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