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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Lourah M. Kelly, Cory A. Crane, Kristyn Zajac and Caroline J. Easton

Past studies demonstrated the efficacy of integrated cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorder (SUD) and intimate partner violence (IPV) as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

Past studies demonstrated the efficacy of integrated cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorder (SUD) and intimate partner violence (IPV) as well as high rates of depressive symptoms in this population. However, little is known about how depressive symptoms impact treatment outcomes. The authors hypothesized that integrated CBT, but not standard drug counseling (DC), would buffer the negative effects of depressive symptoms on treatment response.

Design/methodology/approach

A secondary analysis of a randomized trial compared men assigned to 12 weeks of integrated CBT for SUD and IPV (n = 29) to those in DC (n = 34).

Findings

Most (60%) of the sample reported any depressive symptoms. Controlling for baseline IPV, reporting any depressive symptoms was associated with more positive cocaine screens during treatment. Among men with depressive symptoms, integrated CBT but not DC was associated with fewer positive cocaine screens. Controlling for baseline alcohol variables, integrated CBT and depressive symptoms were each associated with less aggression outside of intimate relationships (family, strangers, etc.) during treatment. For men without depressive symptoms, integrated CBT was associated with less non-IPV aggression compared to DC. Effects were not significant for other substances, IPV, or at follow-up.

Research limitations/implications

This study found some evidence for differential response to CBT by depressive symptoms on cocaine and aggression at end of treatment, which did not persist three months later. Future studies should explore mechanisms of integrated CBT for SUD and IPV, including mood regulation, on depressive symptoms in real-world samples.

Practical implications

Integrated CBT buffered depressive symptoms’ impact on cocaine use, yet only improved non-IPV aggression in men without depressive symptoms.

Originality/value

Although integrated CBT’s efficacy for improving SUD and IPV has been established, moderators of treatment response have not been investigated.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Parveen Ali, Peter Allmark, Andrew Booth, Farah Seedat, Helen B Woods and Julie McGarry

This paper aims to estimate the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) in the UK general population and in the low-risk clinical population and to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to estimate the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) in the UK general population and in the low-risk clinical population and to identify the methodological challenges presented by this task.

Design/methodology/approach

A rapid review of the evidence was conducted. Data were extracted with the help of pre-designed tools and were synthesised to answer the two study aims. The data extracted was both qualitative and quantitative.

Findings

In the general population, crime survey data gave a range of past-year IPV prevalence from 1.8% to 4.5%. This was higher in women than men (2.5%–6.3% vs 0.9%–2.7%). In both the general and low-risk clinical population, there was little data on pregnant women or gay men and lesbians. No significant relationships between IPV and ethnicity were found. Different surveys used different definitions of IPV and domestic violence, making it difficult to give an accurate estimate. There were also problems with data accuracy.

Originality/value

This research is original and contributes to the knowledge about IPV screening and if prevalence studies help.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Abdorrahim Afkhamzadeh, Khaled Rahmani, Rojin Yaghubi, Mahsa Ghadrdan and Obeidollah Faraji

This study aims to conduct to determine the adverse perinatal outcomes of intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy in Kurdistan, Iran.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to conduct to determine the adverse perinatal outcomes of intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy in Kurdistan, Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

In a prospective cohort study, 1,080 pregnant women were categorized into 433 and 647 women, respectively, exposed and unexposed to IPV followed by 48 h post-delivery. The values of incidence rate, relative risk and corresponding 95% confidence interval were calculated for interesting outcomes.

Findings

There was a statistically significant association between IPV exposure during pregnancy and perinatal mortality, pre-term birth (PTB), intra uterine growth restriction (IUGR), premature rupture of membranes (PROM), placental abruption and low birth weight (LBW).

Social implications

Iran is a developing country with a mosaic of different ethnicities and cultures. It seems that the less developed regions of Iran, such as Kurdistan, are also culturally different from most other regions of Iran. Based on a systematic review study, the prevalence of domestic violence is estimated to be 66% (CI 95%: 55–77) in the general population of Iran. This value was 75% (CI 95%: 56–94) in western Iran, the geographic area of the study, and higher than other parts of the country. IPV during pregnancy can result in many adverse outcomes for mothers and children.

Originality/value

According to the results of this study, the occurrence of prenatal mortality, PTB, IUGR, PROM, placental abruption and LBW was significantly higher in pregnant women exposed to IPV during pregnancy compared with unexposed women. Strategies such as training the skills needed for health system staff to identify female victims of violence, counseling, treatment and referral to related specialized centers are suggested.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2013

Avery Everhart and Gwen Hunnicutt

This research explores the experiences of self-identified queer victims of intimate partner violence, their personal encounters with violence-response organizations, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This research explores the experiences of self-identified queer victims of intimate partner violence, their personal encounters with violence-response organizations, and the extent to which their gender/sexual identity impacted their willingness to disclose their abuse.

Design/methodology/approach

Eleven respondents were recruited from online queer social networking sites and were interviewed via e-mail or Skype.

Findings

All respondents identified as gender variant or had an abusive partner who identified as gender variant. All study participants reported having experienced physical abuse. Several reported sexual and emotional abuse. Respondents reported a reluctance to seek institutional support and intervention. Several respondents were unable to recognize abuse as abuse until much later. When asked about whether or not they sought intervention, most respondents in this study described a sort of isolation, where they perceived that they were facing prejudice and stigmatization, and risked being dismissed and delegitimized. Several respondents sensed that there simply were no organizations that were sensitized and available to queer-identified victims. Even if they had pursued help from existing institutions, several respondents communicated a doubt that they could truly be of service, since these institutions likely operated with heteronormative narratives and practices. Collectively, the respondents in this study describe experiences as victims of IPV that are clearly mediated by homophobia and cissism.

Implications

We emphasize the need for an “intersectional awareness” in scholarship and organizing surrounding IPV. We critique the state’s gender-based practices of violence intervention and propose alternative possibilities for more inclusive intervention and organizing on behalf of queer victims of violence.

Originality/value

The body of literature that exists on IPV among LGBTQ persons is small, and much of this literature is focused on how patterns of IPV differ from heterosexual violence. In exploring IPV among self-identified queer victims, we depart from most research on IPV in that our analysis is not so much concerned with the gender or sex assignment of the victim, but rather the gendered context in which the violence is playing out.

Details

Gendered Perspectives on Conflict and Violence: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-110-6

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Luca Rollè, Fabrizio Santoniccolo, Domenico D'Amico and Tommaso Trombetta

Introduction: Media representation of intimate partner violence (IPV) can influence public opinion and understanding of the phenomena and guide health policies. The…

Abstract

Introduction: Media representation of intimate partner violence (IPV) can influence public opinion and understanding of the phenomena and guide health policies. The current review has the aim to explore and discuss international, scientific literature focused on the portrayal of IPV in written forms of news media.

Method: Searching through EBSCO and PubMed, 2,435 studies were found and 41 were included in the current review.

Results: Bias in the portrayal of IPV was found within the studies included. While IPV-related news was mainly focused on male-perpetrated violence within heterosexual couples, little attention was paid to same-sex intimate partner violence (SSIPV). Newsworthy stories dominate IPV reporting within news media and a sensationalistic style was often employed. Furthermore, contextual information was often limited and the adoption of a thematic frame was rare, while news media were found to commonly employ an episodic frame. Official sources and family, friends and neighbours were the most quoted sources in news articles, while IPV experts were rarely drawn on for information. Regarding media representation of perpetrators, mainly regarding male abusers, news articles reported several reasons behind the violence with the consequence to justify and exonerate them from their responsibilities. Female perpetrators were found to be depicted, in some cases, as ‘mad’ or ‘bad’ people. Finally, victim-blaming content emerged within many of the articles included.

Conclusion: Bias in the media representation of IPV emerged in the current review, which needs to be addressed to positively influence public opinion and to promote an adequate understanding of the phenomena.

Details

Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Michelle K. Duffy, Kristin L. Scott and Anne M. O’Leary-Kelly

The impact of workplace violence on occupational stress and well being is garnering increasing attention. Despite the fact that workplace violence has been identified as a…

Abstract

The impact of workplace violence on occupational stress and well being is garnering increasing attention. Despite the fact that workplace violence has been identified as a critical organizational safety and health issue, there has been limited scholarly focus on the problem of domestic or intimate partner violence in the workplace. This paper examines intimate partner violence from both ecological and work family spillover modes of theorizing. Within this framework, we propose that the effects of intimate partner violence are reciprocal and spillover into the workplace, impacting employee and organizational well being. We conclude by discussing the implications of the integrated framework and by offering suggestions for future research in this area.

Details

Exploring Interpersonal Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-153-8

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2021

Sonam Phuntsho, Tashi Dendup, I Gusti Ngurah Edi Putra, Mongal Singh Gurung, Dorji Pelzom and Neyzang Wangmo

This paper is to examine the factors associated with partner violence (IPV) in Bhutan.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is to examine the factors associated with partner violence (IPV) in Bhutan.

Design/methodology/approach

The nationally representative National Health Survey data conducted in 2012 was used. The survey included 12,210 women aged 15–75 years. Multiple logistic regression accounting for complex survey design was performed to assess the possible association of the putative factors with physical, sexual, psychological and any IPV experienced in the past 12 months before the survey.

Findings

Alcohol consumption, quarrelling habits and extramarital relationships of husbands/partners were associated with the experience of all types and any IPV. Women performing household chores had increased odds of sexual and any IPV, and those whose husbands had low education levels were more likely to experience physical IPV. Women living in households with >9 members had reduced odds of physical and any IPV. Women married to older husbands/partners were less likely to be psychologically abused. Women from poorer wealth quintiles and who married before reaching 18 years of age also had greater odds of any IPV.

Originality/value

Poor relationship quality, alcohol use, household size, low education, early marriage, poor wealth status and husband’s age were factors associated with one or more types of IPV in Bhutan. Interventions to reduce alcohol use, transform social norms, promote healthy relationships and enhance female empowerment through socio-economic programs may help prevent IPV.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Deborah Morris, Claudia Camden-Smith and Robert Batten

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a complex public health and social issue. Women with an intellectual disability (ID) are at greater risk of experiencing IPV. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a complex public health and social issue. Women with an intellectual disability (ID) are at greater risk of experiencing IPV. However, little is known about the IPV experiences of women with an ID and forensic care needs. The purpose of this paper is to explore the history of experienced and perpetrated IPV in women detained to secure specialist ID forensic service.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants completed the Conflict Tactics Scale-2 (CTS-2, Straus et al., 1996). The CTS-2 measures experienced and perpetrated relationship tactics of common forms of IPV.

Findings

Participants reported high levels of experiencing and perpetrating IPV across all relationship tactics measured by the CTS-2. Participants reported they engaged in similar levels of experiencing and perpetrating positive and negative relationship tactics. The only significant difference was “minor sexual coercive behavior” where participants were significantly more likely to experience than perpetrate this behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Further research exploring the risk factors that contribute to IPV is needed. Shortcomings in the current study are acknowledged.

Practical implications

Women with an ID and forensic profiles may present with treatment needs as victims and perpetrators of IPV. Clinical activities of women in Forensic ID services should include possible IPV care needs. The importance of developing national guidance and interventions to prevent and manage IPV are discussed.

Originality/value

This is the first paper, to the authors’ knowledge, to explore experiences of IPV in women with an ID and forensic care needs.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Lisa Fedina, Bethany L. Backes, Hyun-Jin Jun, Jordan DeVylder and Richard P. Barth

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship among police legitimacy/trust and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV), including victims’ decisions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship among police legitimacy/trust and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV), including victims’ decisions to report IPV to police and police responses to IPV.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were drawn from the 2017 Survey of Police–Public Encounters II – a cross-sectional, general population survey of adults from New York City and Baltimore (n=1,000). Regression analyses were used to examine associations among police legitimacy/trust, IPV exposure, police reporting of IPV, and perceived police responses to IPV and interaction effects.

Findings

Higher levels of IPV exposure were significantly associated with lower levels of police legitimacy/trust; however, this relationship was stronger among African–American participants than non-African–American participants. Higher levels of police legitimacy/trust were significantly associated with more positive police responses to IPV and this relationship was stronger among heterosexual participants than sexual minority participants.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine prospective relationships to understand causal mechanisms linking individual perceptions of police legitimacy/trust, experiences with IPV and victims’ interactions with police.

Practical implications

Low levels of legitimacy/trust between police and citizens may result, in part, if police are engaged in negative or inadequate responses to reports of IPV. Police–social work partnerships can enhance effective police responses to IPV, particularly to racial/ethnic and sexual minority individuals.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence linking police legitimacy/trust to the experiences of IPV and perceived police responses to reports of IPV, including important group differences among victims based on race/ethnicity and sexual orientation.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Martha Canfield, Polly Radcliffe, Ana Flavia Pires Lucas D’Oliveira and Gail Gilchrist

The purpose of this paper is to examine frequency and correlates of intimate partner violence (IPV) severity perpetrated by heterosexual men receiving treatment for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine frequency and correlates of intimate partner violence (IPV) severity perpetrated by heterosexual men receiving treatment for substance use towards a current partner in the past 12 months.

Design/methodology/approach

A secondary analysis of a self-reported questionnaire (n=162) completed by men receiving treatment for substance use in England and Brazil was conducted. Types of IPV perpetration (emotional, physical and/or sexual IPV) and frequency of occurrence were assessed. A five level ordinal variable for IPV perpetration severity was created: no IPV, minor; moderate, low severe and high severe. Psychological and cultural correlates of perpetration severity were explored using ordinal logistic regression.

Findings

Approximately four in ten men reported perpetrating IPV towards their partner in the past 12 months, one in ten reported perpetrating severe IPV (including hitting with something, kicking or beating, choking or burning, threatening with/using a weapon, sexual IPV and frequent emotional IPV) during this period. A number of correlates of perpetration severity were identified: experiencing childhood physical abuse, witnessing IPV in childhood, perpetrating IPV in previous relationships, committing violence towards another man, controlling behaviours, technology-facilitated abuse, depressive symptoms, having a substance using partner, receiving treatment for illicit drug use, hazardous drinking and poly-drug use.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the small sample size, small to large positive associations were observed between reporting IPV perpetration and several factors. These factors could be targeted to improve identification and assessment of IPV among men receiving treatment for substance use.

Originality/value

A strength of this study methodology is the use of a specific 12 months time frame for the perpetration of IPV towards current partner. The categorisation of levels of IPV perpetration based on types and frequency of violence occurrence was an additional valuable contribution of this study.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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