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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Ashish Kumar, Vikas Srivastava and Mosab I. Tabash

The objective of this systematic literature review (SLR) is to outline the existing research in the field of infrastructure project finance (IPF). This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this systematic literature review (SLR) is to outline the existing research in the field of infrastructure project finance (IPF). This paper aims to summarise the academic and practitioner research to highlight the benefits of adopting IPF structures in uncertain environments. By highlighting all conceptual and applied implications of IPF, the study identifies future research directions to develop a holistic understanding of IPF.

Design/methodology/approach

The SLR is based on 125 articles published in peer-reviewed journals during 1975–2019. After providing a brief overview of IPF, research methodology and citation, publication and author analysis, the SLR presents the various domains around which existing research in IPF is focussed and provides future research propositions in each domain.

Findings

The study found that despite the increased usage of IPF, academic and practitioner research in the field is lagging. Also, with increased usage of IPF in emerging and under-developed economies, IPF structure presents a perfect setting to understand how investment and financing are interlinked and how to overcome the institutional voids, socio-economic risks and inter-partner differences by IPF structures.

Originality/value

This literature review paper is based on the research in IPF between 1975 and 2019. To the best of the authors’ understanding, the SLR is the first focussed study detailing a methodical and thorough compendium of existing studies in the IPF domain. By focussing on various domains of IPF research, this paper presents future research avenues in the field.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Lixin Liu, Justin Zuopeng Zhang, Wu He and Wenzhuo Li

Risks resulted from asymmetric information have become crucial barriers for commercial banks to implement supply chain finance (SCF) – mainly the inventory pledge…

Abstract

Purpose

Risks resulted from asymmetric information have become crucial barriers for commercial banks to implement supply chain finance (SCF) – mainly the inventory pledge financing (IPF). At the same time, online financial service providers (OFSPs) are emerging as strong competitors in the SCF market. As a result, commercial banks need to update their traditional SCF business models and alleviate their over-dependence on OFSPs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ a multi-case-study method to investigate how the Internet of things (IoT) and blockchain technologies can be jointly leveraged to mitigate SCF risks. In-depth interviews were conducted to depict the business models and their novel ecosystem to reinforce traditional banks' ability in SCF services.

Findings

From the perspective of information asymmetry, the authors categorize IPF risks into three groups based on the principal-agent theory: collateral, warehousing and liquidity risk. The findings suggest that IoT can primarily improve traditional banks' information acquisition ability, and blockchain can facilitate credible information transformation, enabling banks to acquire knowledge from collaterals. Besides, the e-platform in the new architecture increases banks' involvement in the supply chain and builds a fair network to curtail warehousing risks. The employment of smart contracts and collaborative mechanism ensure process and outcome control in mitigating liquidity risks.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the literature by confirming the role of emerging technologies in reducing information asymmetry risks. Besides, the findings provide valuable insights for practitioners to promote effective practices and approaches in IPF.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Subhra Pattnaik and Susmita Pattnaik

Performance is considered to be a multi-dimensional construct with three underlying dimensions such as Task Performance (TP), Interpersonal Facilitation (IPF), and Job…

Abstract

Purpose

Performance is considered to be a multi-dimensional construct with three underlying dimensions such as Task Performance (TP), Interpersonal Facilitation (IPF), and Job Dedication (JD). Yet, these dimensions exhibit high inter-correlations in many studies. This study explores the dimensionality of performance as perceived by managers in Indian Public Sector Units (PSUs) and its implications on the sustainability of performance practices in these organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Performance data of 588 PSU executives was obtained from their respective managers (162 in number) using a pen-paper survey. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) followed by a Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was employed to test the dimensionality of the performance construct using SPSS 25 and AMOS 24.

Findings

The data obtained had best fit when performance was modelled as a second order factor with the three dimensions drawing on it as first order indicators. However, the measurement model with employee performance modelled as a one-dimensional first order factor had poor fit. This indicates that PSU managers do perceive an implicit differentiation between the performance dimensions, but the performance ratings do not explicitly reflect that differentiation.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first ever study in Indian context that explores the perception of PSU managers on performance dimensionality. It discusses if Indian PSUs could sustain the dynamism of the future workplace with the present performance management practices and makes relevant suggestions in that direction.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Subhra Pattnaik

With human resource (HR) roles evolving to encompass wider responsibilities, HR decision-making in organizations has become more complex than ever. This has compelled…

Abstract

With human resource (HR) roles evolving to encompass wider responsibilities, HR decision-making in organizations has become more complex than ever. This has compelled researchers in the area to move beyond simplistic models to testing models that involve studying the relationship between multiple independent and dependent variables in the presence of moderators and mediators, in order to make relevant contribution to managerial decision-making. Thus, research in the field is heavily dependent on multivariate techniques that can run several regressions simultaneously and can study the influence of one variable on the other, in presence of the other variables in the model. Structural equation modeling is the most widely used multivariate technique and involves two phases – measurement model to test reliability and validity of study constructs and structural model that involves path diagrams to test the causal relationships between these constructs. At times, however, the researcher might run into trouble with validity issues of constructs in the measurement model; especially when dimensions of a larger construct are used as independent constructs in the study. Introducing a second-order construct in such a case could be the solution to proceed further. Using empirical data, this chater illustrates the case of such a problematic measurement model and details the research methodology of introducing and working with a second-order construct in a step-wise manner, starting with an exploratory factor analysis and subsequently, moving toward a confirmatory factor analysis, highlighting the best practices to be followed while using these statistical techniques.

Details

Methodological Issues in Management Research: Advances, Challenges, and the Way Ahead
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-973-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Sotiris Tsolacos

The paper seeks to evaluate accuracy and efficiency of consensus forecasts for all property rents and total returns in the UK. The aim of the paper is to investigate…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to evaluate accuracy and efficiency of consensus forecasts for all property rents and total returns in the UK. The aim of the paper is to investigate whether consensus forecasts, containing a high degree of judgement, are better than forecasts produced by uncomplicated time‐series and econometric models that practitioners can easily estimate and use for forecasting.

Design/methodology/approach

This study estimates simple models of all property rents and returns and generates forecasts for one‐ and two‐year horizons on a rolling basis over the period 1999 to 2004. These forecasts are real time forecasts. That is they are made using information available to the analyst at the time of the forecast each year and no future knowledge is assumed. The forecasts made by these models are compared with the corresponding consensus forecasts. The comparative assessment is based on conventional tests for bias, variability and efficiency of forecasts.

Findings

If attention is focused on rents, the consensus forecast is ranked best for the one‐year horizon but it is outperformed by the regression model and a combination of the statistical models for the two‐year horizon. For the one‐year and two‐year forecasts of total returns a simple regression model with interest rates clearly improves upon the consensus forecasts. There is clear evidence that the consensus forecasts fail to incorporate the information contained in recent interest rate movements. Therefore subject to the sample period for this analysis the survey forecasts of total returns cannot be considered impartial. Analysts should include base rate information into their predictions.

Originality/value

This is one of the few attempts to formally evaluate consensus forecasts in the real estate field and perform a direct comparison with quantitative forecasts. It produces initial evidence suggesting that highly judgemental consensus forecasts do not necessarily outperform quantitative forecasts based on fundamentals. It prompts property forecasters and investors to engage in forecast evaluation and include missing information and past errors in their forecasts.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2007

Paul Williamson

Abstract

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Modelling Our Future: Population Ageing, Health and Aged Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-808-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Marián Vitkovicˇ

Although mass privatizations in Slovakia had the same starting point as those in the Czech Republic, mass privatisation in Slovakia led to a different ownership structure…

Abstract

Although mass privatizations in Slovakia had the same starting point as those in the Czech Republic, mass privatisation in Slovakia led to a different ownership structure, which also partly reflects the different industry structure. Proximately to political decision making of the new management is close and explicit. The new structure lends itself to targeted industrial policy.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 30 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

W.E. Herbert and E. Dockery

The pace of economic reforms in the emerging markets of Central and Eastern Europe through such measures as macro stabilisation policies, price liberalisation and currency…

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5830

Abstract

The pace of economic reforms in the emerging markets of Central and Eastern Europe through such measures as macro stabilisation policies, price liberalisation and currency convertibility has helped to demonstrate that economic transition can be achieved fairly rapidly. Certainly, the challenge for these economies has been to construct, through the new freedom afforded economic agents, (households and firms), an economy that can: (a) facilitate non‐inflationary economic growth, and (b) usher in improvements in social and economic welfare. It is the interconnection between the macroeconomic stabilisation measures (e.g. tight fiscal and monetary policies) and the desire to alter decades of economic decline which has prompted the commitment of these governments to fostering a greater reliance on market forces to improve the overall efficiency of resource utilisation (See Lipton and Sachs, 1990). The global impression is that the competitiveness and industrial restructuring efforts are beginning to alter the economic structure of these countries, which are being met with varying success; (see, for example, Hare and Hughes, 1991).

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 22 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Nicola Livingstone and Danielle Sanderson

The UK's purpose-built student accommodation (PBSA) sector has seen significant institutional investment in recent decades. This paper unpacks contemporary trends and…

Abstract

Purpose

The UK's purpose-built student accommodation (PBSA) sector has seen significant institutional investment in recent decades. This paper unpacks contemporary trends and perspectives on the sector. It questions whether PBSA has moved from being an “alternative” to “mainstream” residential asset class, framing the analysis through the lens of market maturity.

Design/methodology/approach

The methods triangulate perspectives drawn from literature on the evolution of PBSA as an asset class with illustrations of investment trends across the UK between 2005 and 2020 using data from Real Capital Analytics (RCA), combined with findings from 40 semi-structured interviews with investors and stakeholders in PBSA in the UK London is the focus of the work, whilst other regional cities are integrated for comparison.

Findings

The results demonstrate that London's PBSA market is ahead of trends currently being replicated in regional cities. However, the regions currently offer greater return potential and opportunities for risk taking compared to London, where yields are compressed, and the market is considered lower risk. The concept of maturity remains useful as a framework for evaluating markets, however a more granular analysis of sectors is necessary to further understand asset classes within sectors. PBSA continues to trade at a premium across the UK; it is considered the most mature residential asset class.

Practical implications

The emergence of PBSA as an asset class continues to play a developing role within the residential sector and UK investment market. Risk, value and local context remain key when integrating PBSA into institutional portfolios, and as the first to consider the UK market from a qualitative research approach, this research provides a snapshot of these influences in 2021.

Originality/value

Our approach offers original insight into investment trends across the UK and is the first to focus reflections on the London market specifically. The research highlights the role of PBSA as a vanguard asset class for investors into residential, situating its growth within the framework of market maturity and drawing out market nuances from interviews.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Jakob Keller, Patricia Burkhardt and Rainer Lasch

The purpose of this study is to explore if and how informal governance mechanisms are used for coordinating actors of digitalized supply networks.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore if and how informal governance mechanisms are used for coordinating actors of digitalized supply networks.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study analysis of ten German firms in digitalized supply networks is conducted. Data are collected through semi-structured expert interviews with interviewees having notable years of professional experience in purchasing or sales.

Findings

This research shows that reduced personal contacts in digitalized supply networks decrease the ability to coordinate with informal governance mechanisms. However, the need for informal governance in digitalized supply networks remains when facing supply network disruptions or building new business relationships.

Originality/value

This is the first study examining the role of informal governance mechanisms in digitalized supply networks. Theoretical and practical insights on the changing abilities and needs to use informal governance after the digital transformation are given.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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