Search results

1 – 10 of 95
Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Liam Leonard

This chapter explores the state's response to the waste crisis (see also McDonagh, Varley, & Shortall, 2009). The conceptual basis for key turning points in the state's…

Abstract

This chapter explores the state's response to the waste crisis (see also McDonagh, Varley, & Shortall, 2009). The conceptual basis for key turning points in the state's waste management policy is located within the parameters of an EM approach. An outline of eco-modern and sustainable thinking is provided in the chapter, as the state's policy shift on waste, from a reliance on landfill to a strategy informed by the EU's waste hierarchy would provide many of the political opportunities for GSE, and their political allies, to exploit.

Details

Community Campaigns for Sustainable Living: Health, Waste & Protest in Civil Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-381-1

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

B. Richards

Concern over global environmental pollution has resulted in a raft of new legislation, a major impact of whichhas been fundamental re‐evaluation of processing technologies…

709

Abstract

Concern over global environmental pollution has resulted in a raft of new legislation, a major impact of which has been fundamental re‐evaluation of processing technologies used within the electronics manufacturing industry. Although compliance remains a key driver for change, other factors (e.g., market, social, new business opportunities) are also providing significant pressures. Assessments of how to control pollution have led to a much deeper appreciation of how to manage this dramatic impact on the industry. In the short‐term, the key is dealing with emissions from current premises and processes. But in the longer‐term, improvements are only possible by designing products to minimise the whole‐life environmental impact (e.g., avoiding hazardous materials, minimising waste, designing for re‐use and recycling). Crucial to the success of both short‐term and long‐term activities are the motivation and co‐operation of the workforce, together with the commitment and support of management. This paper examines some of the pressures on the industry, highlights several of the resultant technical and management challenges, and briefly outlines how one company is successfully addressing these challenges.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2011

The increasing trend towards sustainable development has seen a shift from ‘end of pipe solutions’ to the ongoing threat of pollution. Policy makers have come to accept…

Abstract

The increasing trend towards sustainable development has seen a shift from ‘end of pipe solutions’ to the ongoing threat of pollution. Policy makers have come to accept the need for some form of inbuilt environmental standards to be included in any overall planning strategy. These shifts come in the wake of the Brundtland Report and the Rio World Summit. They have also shaped environmental policy. A central feature of this new thinking is the theory of ‘Ecological Modernisation’ (EM). Underpinning this debate are the theorists Janicke, Weale and Hajer, who have each contributed to the conceptualisation of EM as a feature of modern society. It can be argued that EM theory reflects a critical new positioning of the environmental debate, moving away from the periphery of social, cultural and political channels and becoming an important aspect of policy planning in these areas.

Details

Community Campaigns for Sustainable Living: Health, Waste & Protest in Civil Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-381-1

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Lorna Cullen

The Palexpo Exhibition and Conference Centre close to Geneva Airport was the location for this timely event organised by the EIPC and sponsored by Du Pont Electronics…

Abstract

The Palexpo Exhibition and Conference Centre close to Geneva Airport was the location for this timely event organised by the EIPC and sponsored by Du Pont Electronics. Participants, including speakers, chairpersons and press, totalled approximately 190—perhaps a slightly lower figure than anticipated for this first European symposium on an issue of considerable significance for the industry.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Lei Nie, Michael Pecht and Richard Ciocci

This paper seeks to investigate the electronics industry's reaction to environmental regulations specifically in terms of lead‐free solders and halogen‐free flame‐retardants (FRs).

663

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate the electronics industry's reaction to environmental regulations specifically in terms of lead‐free solders and halogen‐free flame‐retardants (FRs).

Design/methodology/approach

This work achieves its objective by discussing the various international environmental regulations pertaining to electronics manufacturing and relating the industry reactions to those regulations. It also provides the market trends related to lead‐ and halogen‐free products. The electronics industry is pursuing lead‐free solders and halogen‐free FRs, in part due to regulations. However, the paper includes examples of how the industry is successful in implementing environmentally friendly changes.

Findings

The authors compared regulations from Japan, the European Union, the USA, and China. While the regulations themselves vary in scope, industry actions to find alternatives do have common purposes. Electronics manufacturers recognize that environmentally motivated changes are beneficial in terms of waste minimization.

Research limitations/implications

Electronics manufacturers that are interested in green design will benefit from understanding present regulations. They will also benefit from the included examples of product and process improvement for the purpose of environmental compatibility.

Originality/value

This paper derives its perspective from a similar review of literature and company findings that the authors completed in 2006. As refinement of the regulations has continued, the electronics industry has developed improvements in basic materials and processes.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Xia Cao, Zeyu Xing and Keke Sun

This paper aims to forecast the future development of UIC technology according to the changes of IPC in different time periods. The findings also provide a theoretical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to forecast the future development of UIC technology according to the changes of IPC in different time periods. The findings also provide a theoretical basis for the UIC policymakers of energy-saving environmental protection industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study will take energy-saving technology as an example, through using a two-mode network analysis method to build the four-stage IPC code UIC innovation-technology network, researching UIC innovation network applicant heterogeneity, UIC technology network and technology relevance.

Findings

Through the establishment of UIC innovation-technology two-mode network, namely, applicant node CN and IPC node TN, this paper analyzes the important applicants, focal technologies, correlation of focal technologies and the development trends of energy saving technology in the future by using the related theories and methods of two-mode network.

Originality/value

At present, only about 11% of energy-saving enterprises in China have R&D activities. The government needs to implement top-level design, improve industrial policies, strengthen investment in technology R&D and build a platform for technological innovation in energy-saving industries to support the R&D of common and key technologies in energy-saving industries.

Details

foresight, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2022

Muhammad Usman Shahid, Muhammad Jamaluddin Thaheem and Husnain Arshad

The construction industry struggles in environmental and economic performance due to waste generation. Several studies have measured this waste in the construction…

Abstract

Purpose

The construction industry struggles in environmental and economic performance due to waste generation. Several studies have measured this waste in the construction industry of developing countries like India, Brazil, China, Nigeria and Iran, and proposed strategies to enhance the overall efficiency. But no such work exists in Pakistan's context. The construction industry of Pakistan contributes significantly to the country's gross domestic product (GDP). And with several mega projects in progress to overcome the energy crises and improve the infrastructure of the country, the absence of proper waste management policies and plans calls for empirical research. Therefore, this study quantifies and benchmarks material waste in the local context, its impact on project cost and the effect of multiple subcontracting arrangements on waste generation. It also proposes a conceptual waste management plan (WMP) for local conditions which can be generalized for developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a mixed research approach by leveraging Saunders's research onion model. To benchmark the current wastage practices, quantitative data of material waste in the Pakistani construction industry are gathered through document review of accounting systems, inventory and payment records of 40 completed building projects. Using the data, the waste rate of different materials is measured along with their impact on cost. Additionally, the role of subcontracting arrangements in waste generation is also investigated. Also, semi-structured interviews are conducted with project managers of high- and low-performing construction organizations to propose a conceptual WMP for the local industry and developing countries.

Findings

The highest wasteful materials by quantity are wood, sand and concrete blocks, and those by cost are wood, bricks and steel. By quantity, 123% more material was used on average than the actual productive work. Also, the labor only (L-O) subcontracting arrangement causes maximum waste. Moreover, the difference between the highest (155%) and lowest wasting company (104%) is 51%, highlighting the proactive and resistive waste management culture and approach by the worst- and best-performing companies. Further, the impact of waste quantities is more than 2% of the project cost. Finally, a conceptual model consisting of measures at the project, industry and national levels is also proposed as a guide for developing countries.

Practical implications

The findings of this benchmarking study can help improve the project planning, execution and monitoring, and control practices by providing a better understanding of the material waste potential. This will help economize the construction industry and improve its sustainability.

Originality/value

This is the first benchmarking study that quantitatively measures material waste in the construction industry of Pakistan. It highlights that costly as well as sustainability-implicating materials are frequently wasted in the local construction projects. Also, this study correlates the wastage with subcontracting arrangements. Additionally, an original conceptual WMP is proposed that could help the industry improve its performance. The findings could help the construction professionals identify the loopholes in their material management practices and not only save money but also ensure better sustainability.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Richard Ciocci and Michael Pecht

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the electronic industry's reaction to environmental regulations specifically in terms of lead‐free solders and halogen‐free…

4500

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the electronic industry's reaction to environmental regulations specifically in terms of lead‐free solders and halogen‐free flame‐retardants (FRs).

Design/methodology/approach

This work achieves its objective by discussing the various international regulations pertaining to electronics manufacturing and relating the industry reactions to those regulations. The electronics industry is pursuing lead‐free solders and halogen‐free FRs, in part due to regulations. However, the paper includes examples of how the industry is successful in implementing environmentally friendly changes.

Findings

The authors compared regulations from Japan, the European Union, and the US. While the regulations themselves vary in scope, industry actions to find alternatives do have common purposes. Electronics manufacturers recognize that environmentally motivated changes are beneficial in terms of waste minimization. Regardless of the regulatory motivation, minimization does lead to energy and economic efficiency.

Practical implications

Electronics manufacturers that are interested in green design will benefit from understanding present regulations. They will also benefit from the included examples of product and process improvement for the purpose of environmental compatibility. The paper includes specific examples of material alternatives to banned substances.

Originality/value

This paper derives its perspective from a similar review of literature and company findings that the authors completed in 2001. As refinement of the regulations has continued, the electronics industry has developed improvements in basic materials and processes.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 December 2021

Luz María Marín-Vinuesa, Pilar Portillo-Tarragona and Sabina Scarpellini

This study aims to define and measure the capabilities applied by firms to waste-related patents and their relations with the businesses economic performance to support…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to define and measure the capabilities applied by firms to waste-related patents and their relations with the businesses economic performance to support decision-making towards a circular economy (CE).

Design/methodology/approach

A model of cause-and-effect relationships between firms' waste-related patents and the firm' capabilities was defined within the dynamic capabilities' theoretical framework. Empirical results were obtained by applying partial least squares structural equation modelling to a sample of 2,216 Spanish firms that hold 120,406 patents.

Findings

Results revealed the importance of the innovation capabilities of firms related to patenting, such as collaborative innovation, persistence in patenting or the capabilities to collaborate with research institutes, as drivers of level of waste patents to improve the businesses economic performance.

Research limitations/implications

The systemic nature of the CE at the firm level suggests future research focused on the environmental divergence that appears when the innovation on waste fall outside the regular domain of its industry. Another topic to be investigated is related to the full text of patents that could improve the results of this study.

Practical implications

The definition of indicators to measure investments in the CE is complex, but it is necessary to assess progress in the closing of material loops at a micro level and to report the investments in waste-related patents in a circular model to the stakeholders involved in the economic management of the company.

Originality/value

Measuring CE-related patents and the specific capabilities needed for patenting in a circular framework is an understudied topic, and this study opens a specific line of inquiry enhancing the knowledge of CE within the dynamic capabilities' theoretical framework.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1990

Edward Sutherland

Summarises the legal implications of the 1990 UK EnvironmentalProtection Act, including integrated pollution control and air pollutioncontrol, waste on land, statutory…

Abstract

Summarises the legal implications of the 1990 UK Environmental Protection Act, including integrated pollution control and air pollution control, waste on land, statutory nuisance and clean air, amendments to the radioactive substances act, genetically modified organisms, nature conservation in great Britain and countryside matters in Wales, and finally some miscellaneous and general provisions.

Details

Facilities, vol. 8 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

1 – 10 of 95