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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Glenn Hardaker, Aishah Sabki, Atika Qazi and Javed Iqbal

Most research on information and communication technologies (ICT) differences has been related to gender and ethnicity, and to a lesser extent religious affiliation. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Most research on information and communication technologies (ICT) differences has been related to gender and ethnicity, and to a lesser extent religious affiliation. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to this field of research by situating the discussion in the context of British Muslims and extending current research into ICT differences beyond gender and ethnicity.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the ICT differences in access and use by British Muslim teenage girls at Islamic faith schools, and ICTs’ perceived influence on learning. The qualitative research was undertaken by conducting 45 semi-structured interviews with British Muslim teenage girls in Islamic faith schools.

Findings

The study provides tentative findings that Islamic faith schools are not only framed by the wider diverse Muslim community, but also by the supplementary schooling of madrasahs. The findings suggest that the home use of ICTs was reinforced rather than compensated for by the Islamic faith schools. This seemed to inhibit many pupils’ access to online educational resources. The authors found that didactic instruction was prevalent and this provided tentative insights into the types of digital inequity experienced by many pupils.

Originality/value

The research into ICT differences in the UK adopted the premise that the unity in Muslim identity increasingly transcends ethnicity and gender in the Muslim community.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Saeid Moradi Rekabdarkolaei and Fattane Amuei

The aim of this paper is to evaluate ICT literacy differences in trainee student teachers from the view of sexuality.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to evaluate ICT literacy differences in trainee student teachers from the view of sexuality.

Design/methodology/approach

In the research, sender differences in self‐reported ICT experience and ICT literacy among first year graduate trainee teachers were investigated. The questionnaires were made available in two forms: printed and online. Also, dynamic model of ICT literacy was employed. Three main components of aspiring teachers' ICT literacy were covered: present general problem‐solving and technical ICT capabilities; situational and longitudinal sustainability; and transferability of ICT capabilities into future professional domain.

Findings

Results show no significant differences were found between females' and males' previous experience with ICT. However, males on average worked with computers significantly more hours per week than females. Significant differences between males' and females' technical ICT capabilities and situational and longitudinal sustainability were observed. Males' scores were higher. In the regression analysis, when the impact of the background and ICT experience variables was controlled, gender failed to be a significant predictor of the sustainability scores. However, it remained a significant predictor of some trainee teachers' scores, related to their technical ICT capabilities.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the literature on the evaluation of ICT literacy differences in trainee student teachers from the view of sexuality and will be of interest to those in the field.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Josef Hynek, Václav Janeček, Frank Lefley, Kateřina Půžová and Jan Němeček

The purpose of this study/paper is evidence to suggest that information communication technology (ICT) capital projects are different from non-ICT projects and that as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study/paper is evidence to suggest that information communication technology (ICT) capital projects are different from non-ICT projects and that as a result the appraisal of such projects is more difficult. This may suggest that organisations would use dissimilar financial and risk assessment models or place different importance levels on such models between the two types of investment. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this issue and present the results of research into the practices of organisations in Czech Republic that have recently undertaken an appraisal of both ICT and non-ICT capital projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A factual and attitudinal survey was developed and conducted during the end of 2011, addressed to organisations based in the Czech Republic. The object of the survey was the identification of current practices in respect of the appraisal of both ICT and non-ICT projects and the opinions of senior executives on a number of important issues regarding such practices. This paper focuses on the issues relating to ICT projects being “different” from non-ICT projects.

Findings

The empirical findings support the literature in that ICT projects are, in many respects, different from non-ICT projects. However, the evidence indicates that, in practice, there is no significant difference in the financial and risk assessment models used in their appraisal. This indicates that any perceived difficulties, which may infer that the projects are “different”, are overcome (or ignored), to some extent, when it comes to the formal financial and risk assessment stage of project appraisal. There is also evidence to suggest that practitioners use assessment models that academics regard as unsophisticated. The findings also show that strategic issues are more important with respect of ICT projects than non-ICT projects. The research therefore supports the view that ICT projects are perceived to be different, but that the current conventional (financial and risk) appraisal models are adequate to appraise such capital projects, provided they are supported by a strategic assessment.

Research limitations/implications

As the findings are based on a survey of companies in the Czech Republic only, we accept that the research results may have some limitations in terms of drawing general conclusions. The concern over drawing general conclusions is also brought about by the relatively low response rate, although the rate is in line with previous published research.

Practical implications

ICT projects are different and as such these differences must be taken into account when appraising capital projects. The evidence supports the need for practitioners to review their appraisal of ICT capital projects, by adopting more sophisticated financial and risk models (as prescribed by academics) and linking their appraisal to corporate strategic goals. Future research should be aimed at identifying the formal and informal strategic approaches adopted by practitioners in the appraisal of ICT capital projects.

Originality/value

This is the only survey to simultaneously address the appraisal issues concerning both ICT and non-ICT projects in the Czech Republic. As such, it gives a valuable insight into the practices of Czech Republic organisations in their appraisal of ICT and non-ICT capital projects. The identification of the four main problem areas with respect to the appraisal of ICT projects will help to focus academic research in the future.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Richard Lucas and Nyree Mason

The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary analysis of age and gender across a number of questions asked in a survey of ethical attitudes of professionals in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary analysis of age and gender across a number of questions asked in a survey of ethical attitudes of professionals in the information and communication technology (ICT) industry in Australia. While a large number of demographic questions regarding ethics and regulation, only those concerning age and gender are examined here.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted of the ICT workplace in Australia. The results were analyzed using SPSS.

Findings

There are some significant differences across the generations as well between the genders. Gen Y is different when compared to the others on how important ethical regulations ought to be. Gen Y thinks that ethical regulations ought to be less important. When gender was examined it was clear that males thought that ethical regulations ought to be significantly less important when compared with what females thought.

Research limitations/implications

While a larger sample size was desired, the consistency of the replies, when compared against a number of comparative populations, indicated that the replies we received were representative of the ICT workforce.

Originality/value

This paper raises many issues that demand greater care and attention be given when constructing new models of governing ethics within the Australian ICT workplace.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Charles Buabeng-Andoh and Issifu Yidana

The purpose of this study is to investigate secondary school students’ pedagogical use of information communication and technologies (ICT), their attitudes toward…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate secondary school students’ pedagogical use of information communication and technologies (ICT), their attitudes toward integration of ICT and the differences in their attitudes based on gender, school type and location.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was collected and analyzed using descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis of variance and multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The study revealed that students’ use of ICT to support their learning was low. Students mostly used ICT to communicate with peers. Students’ methods of assimilating knowledge were through teacher-centred teaching, even though they somewhat used ICT for collaborative and inquiry learning. Students in public schools perceived the use of ICT more valuable than students in private schools. Also, the study provided evidence that students in urban and rural schools differed in their attitudes in terms of perceived value and cost of ICT use, but no differences in attitude in terms of expectancy of success were found to exist among students in all locations.

Originality/value

The study provided further evidence that the value of ICT positively related to students’ pedagogical use of ICT, but the effect was very limited. This implies that although students have positive attitudes toward the benefits of ICT in learning; many do not integrate the technology into their learning. Lastly, the study was able to provide additional evidence that perceived cost negatively related to students’ pedagogical use of technology, but the result was very small. This indicates that since many students do not utilize ICT in their learning they rarely encounter barriers or challenges when it comes to the integration of the technology into their studies.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Anne Milek, Christoph Stork and Alison Gillwald

Information communication technologies (ICTs) are widely seen as having the potential to contribute positively to economic growth and development and to improve the

Abstract

Purpose

Information communication technologies (ICTs) are widely seen as having the potential to contribute positively to economic growth and development and to improve the livelihoods and quality of life of individuals and households and yet access to ICTs and usage of them remains highly inequitable. This paper aims to identify areas of inequality in access to ICTs between men and women in Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the Research ICT Africa (RIA) household and individual ICT survey conducted in 17 African countries between 2007/2008 the paper provides an empirical basis for assessing gender dimensions of ICT access and usage. Additionally, focus group studies were conducted in Cameroon, Ethiopia, Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda to gain a greater qualitative understanding of access to and usage of ICTs from a gender perspective.

Findings

Although the results confirmed in many countries the widely held belief that men have greater access to ICTs than women in some instances more women than men owned mobile phones such as in South Africa and Mozambique. In Cameroon women were found to have greater knowledge of the internet than their male counterparts. Most significantly perhaps is the finding that when women have similar income, education and employment status they have comparable access to ICTs as their male counterparts. However, as women generally do not have the same access to those core factors that enhance ICT access and usage, their access to ICT is generally lower.

Originality/value

The quantitative as well as focus group results of this study confirm gender differences in access to ICTs, raising important questions about the points of policy intervention to redress such imbalances.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Eun G. Park and Wankeun Oh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the main factors influencing government openness, develop a global government openness index (GGOI) for assessing the progress of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the main factors influencing government openness, develop a global government openness index (GGOI) for assessing the progress of government openness and investigate how the factors contribute to the advancement of open government by individual countries and country groups by income.

Design/methodology/approach

This study identifies the four factors and adopts them into four variables for making GGOI: accountability (ACC), citizen participation and freedom (CPF), transparency (TRA) and information and communication technology (ICT). To calculate GGOI, panel data for 134 countries from 2006 to 2015 were used.

Findings

GGOI scores constantly improved with an annual growth rate of 2.09 percent. Countries with high ACC values tend to have high TRA scores, resulting in high GGOI scores. While the differences in ACC and TRA were steady over the period, ICT increased the most in all groups. To boost ICT performance as a channel to support other variables, middle-income countries should make further effort for citizens to use ICT capabilities toward enhancing the levels of CPF and TRA.

Research limitations/implications

This study presents a global picture of the advancement of open government and provides insights into specific areas that can be diagonalized.

Practical implications

The GGOI could be used as a useful assessment tool to measure the progress of government openness in countries and implement policies and action plans for improving government openness.

Originality/value

The GGOI covers the areas related to legal, administrative, participatory and technological factors and provides the factors’ inter-relationships for the composition of GGOI.

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Ken'ichi Matsumoto and Toshihiko Masui

The purpose of this study is to analyze long‐term (up to 2100) impacts of carbon tax based on the imputed price of carbon (ICT) from environmental and economic perspectives.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze long‐term (up to 2100) impacts of carbon tax based on the imputed price of carbon (ICT) from environmental and economic perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

ICT is an international tax with tax rates that differ among countries according to their economic levels. It is evaluated by comparing it with an internationally common carbon tax (CCT), applying the AIM/CGE [Global] model, a dynamic computable general equilibrium model. The ICT rates are determined from a certain formula and the CCT rates are set to achieve global GDP changes equal to the case of ICT.

Findings

According to the results, the world CO2 abatement amount is almost the same between the two taxes. However, the economic impact on each country is different. Although the negative influence is smaller in the case of CCT in developed countries, it is smaller in the case of ICT in developing countries. Moreover, ICT narrows economic disparities among developed and developing countries further. In the light of significance of the worldwide introduction of CO2 abatement policies and avoidance of excessive economic burdens on developing countries, it is concluded that ICT is a more feasible carbon tax policy than CCT.

Originality/value

Although the impacts of ICT have been analyzed from static and mid‐term perspectives, understanding the long‐term dynamic impacts is still essential, considering the features of the tax and possible socioeconomic and technological changes, especially in developing countries. This study proposes a new policy method that will contribute to efforts to combat climate change in the long run.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Fang Zhao, Alan Collier and Hepu Deng

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of the digital divide on e-government development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of the digital divide on e-government development.

Design/methodology/approach

The study takes a multidimensional and integrative approach in order to examine the various ways in which different contextual factors affecting the digital divide (i.e. economic, social, political, demographic, cultural and ICT infrastructure) interact to influence e-government development. To test the hypotheses, authors perform a correlation and multiple regression analysis using SPSS.

Findings

After analysing several global data sets such as those of the World Bank and the United Nations, the study finds that the digital divide is a multidimensional construct that has a significant impact on e-government development in various ways. In contrast to the consensus view of a correlation existing between economic status on the one hand, and the digital divide and e-government development on the other, this study finds that economic status is not a significant predictor of the digital divide or e-government development.

Practical implications

The findings should help inform public policy makers when developing strategies to deal with issues of the digital divide and e-government development by encouraging analysis in a holistic and integrative way. Simply addressing the digital divide alone is unlikely to be sufficient to stimulate an increase in the uptake of e-government. Moreover, our model helps identify areas of strengths as well as weaknesses for improvement.

Originality/value

The authors develop a multidimensional and integrative research model to study the digital divide and e-government development and the relationship between the two, and validate the model through systematically testing it with empirical data. This study is among the first to take such an approach.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Petr Lupač

Abstract

Details

Beyond the Digital Divide: Contextualizing the Information Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-548-7

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