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1 – 10 of 337
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Monir Zaman Mir and Abu Shiraz Rahaman

This paper seeks to evaluate the recent decision of the Bangladeshi Government and accounting profession to adopt international accounting standards (IASs).

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to evaluate the recent decision of the Bangladeshi Government and accounting profession to adopt international accounting standards (IASs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a variety of archival data and interviews with key actors, including preparers and users of annual reports, members of the Securities and Exchange Commission, and members of the professional accounting bodies: ICAB and ICMAB.

Findings

The paper finds that institutional legitimisation is a major factor that drives the decision to adopt IASs because of the pressure exerted by key international donor/lending institutions on the Bangladeshi Government and professional accounting bodies. Such pressure results from not only the need to provide credibility to foreign investors but also the need for strong accountability arrangements with lending/donor agencies. However, the perceived undemocratic nature of the adoption process appears to be creating and enhancing conflict among various constituencies, resulting in very low compliance with these standards.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the understanding of the diffusion of International Accounting Standards and the role of global agencies, such as the World Bank, within this process.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

John Stittle

By 2005 the group financial statements of companies listed on a stock exchange in an EU member state must be prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standards…

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Abstract

By 2005 the group financial statements of companies listed on a stock exchange in an EU member state must be prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standards (IASs). The adoption of IASs should, inter alia: facilitate the movement of capital; remove barriers to cross‐border trading; permit comparison of company results; and assist the evaluation of managerial and corporate performance. The introduction of IASs will impact, in varying degrees, on companies in all member states. However, the affect of IASs on corporate reporting will be more limited in the UK. The UK's existing corporate reporting framework already has significant similarities with many of the IASs' objectives. But for most other EU countries, the adoption of IASs will cause a significant upheaval in accounting policies and in the preparation of annual financial statements. To be implemented successfully, a significant gulf needs to be bridged between the new reporting policies in the IASs and the high degree of state regulation and legalistically‐driven reporting systems already established in these countries. Overall, the introduction of IASs should bring longer‐term benefits but a number of reporting challenges and even confusion will result in the short‐term.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

PL Joshi and Hassan Al‐Basteki

Arguments prevail in Bahrain over whether to establish a body for setting local accounting standards or to continue to encourage the application of international…

Abstract

Arguments prevail in Bahrain over whether to establish a body for setting local accounting standards or to continue to encourage the application of international accounting standards (IASs). This debate is driven by the opinions and attitudes of various concerned groups, including auditors, corporate accountants, and public accountants. This study examines the perceptions of accountants regarding whether or not local accounting standards should be set in Bahrain and, if so, which would be the most appropriate agency to achieve this aim. In addition, the study examines whether organizations in Bahrain should continue to comply with IASs. It provides empirical findings on these issues based on a questionnaire of 52 accountants. The study concludes that organizations in Bahrain should continue to comply with IASs, but that the application of these standards needs to be regulated. Differences in the socio‐political environment do not make IASs of less significance to users in Bahrain. Further, it is found that the need for compliance with IASs will better enhance users' understanding of accounting concepts and financial statements. The study recommends the establishment of a body of professional accountants who will act as the interpreters of IASs in Bahrain's environment.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Saeed Askary and Beverley Jackling

This paper investigates the financial disclosure practices of corporate annual reports published in Asian countries including Bangladesh, Indonesian, Malaysia and the…

Abstract

This paper investigates the financial disclosure practices of corporate annual reports published in Asian countries including Bangladesh, Indonesian, Malaysia and the Middle East countries including Bahrain, Iran, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Turkey. The purpose of the study is to measure the financial disclosure diversity in these countries, with a view to developing a classification of their similarities and differences in respect to their compliance with International Accounting Standards (IAS). Annual reports of 126 public companies liisted on the countries' stock exchanges are the central data source, supplemented with other relevant information about financial disclosure practices in each country. A disclosure checklist adopted from all IASs and summarised in 306 individual items of financial disclosures is used as a means of extending an understanding of financial reporting in these countries. Results show the relative degree of conformity with IASs for each of the countries included in this study.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Mostafa Kamal Hassan

This paper seeks to understand the role of financial accounting regulations in a less developed country in transition, Egypt. It explores the social, political as well as…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to understand the role of financial accounting regulations in a less developed country in transition, Egypt. It explores the social, political as well as economic contexts that underlie the processes of setting the Egyptian Financial Accounting Regulations (EFAR) in a harmony with International Accounting Standards (IASs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on in‐depth interviews and an analysis of documents. It relies on Habermas' notions of society's lifeworld, institutional steering mechanisms and systems in order to link the changes in EFAR to the changes in the wider social, political and economic contexts wherein organizations operate. The paper also explores the role of EFAR, as “regulative” or “constitutive” steering mechanisms, throughout two longitudinal episodes; starting with the beginning of socialism and extending to liberalism.

Findings

The paper finds that the EFAR have had a constitutive tendency during the Egyptian transformation towards a market‐based economy. Although there are remarkable changes in political philosophy in Egypt, the regulators' motivations and the processes of the accountancy profession that mobilized the formulation of EFAR in harmony with IASs, those regulations were acted upon to constitute organizational members' values, norms and knowledge in order to overcome the persistence of the socialist accounting practices. The regulations were also aimed at enhancing professional conduct and, at same time, increasing organizational members' adherence to the processes of privatization as a part of a wider movement towards transparency, democracy, full disclosure and liberalisation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper emphasises the interface between a macro social transformation and micro organizational responses in order to understand the role of EFAR. However, it does not stress how the actual implementation of those regulations is implicated at a micro organizational change level. Furthermore, the paper covers a timeframe – 1952 to 2000 – that extends from the start of socialism extending to liberalism. Although the IASs are now known as International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), the paper covers a period in which such IFRS were not applicable in Egypt.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the understanding of the social, political as well as economic role(s) of financial accounting regulations in a transitional country during that country's transformation towards the market economy.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Mostafa Kamal Hassan

This paper seeks to understand the processes of setting accounting standards in a developing country in transition, namely Egypt. It explores the social, political as well…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to understand the processes of setting accounting standards in a developing country in transition, namely Egypt. It explores the social, political as well as economic forces that underlie the development of financial accounting regulations implemented throughout two longitudinal periods; starting with the beginning of socialism and extending to liberalism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on in‐depth interviews and an analysis of documents. It relies on the institutional theory notions of coercive, mimic and normative isomorphic mechanisms to link the changes in the financial accounting regulations to the changes in the wider social and institutional context wherein organizations operate, while, at the same time, exploring the legitimation processes underlying the development of domestic accounting standards similar to the International Accounting Standards (IASs).

Findings

The paper finds that the major changes in the state's political philosophy, the regulators' motivations and the processes of the accountancy profession provided a momentum to the formulation of Egyptian Accounting Standards (EAS). Though similar to IASs, they were acted upon to overcome the pre‐existing socialist accounting practices, while, at same time, increasing organizational members' adherence to the processes of privatization.

Research limitations/implications

Although the empirical findings suggest that “globalization forces” through technical as well as financial assistance programmes created pressures during the standard‐setting processes, a full investigation and explanation of such pressures are an area of future research.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the understanding of how IASs are diffused in a country in transition and the role of these standards during that country's transformation processes towards the market economy.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Essa El-Firjani, Karim Menacere and Roger Pegum

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and development of corporate accounting regulation in Libya.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and development of corporate accounting regulation in Libya.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire survey and semi-structured interview methods were used to collect data. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with external auditors, financial managers, accounting academics and regulators.

Findings

This paper found general agreement that the accounting regulation of public corporations and banks is strongly influenced by the Libyan Commercial Code and the Income Tax Law. Although listed companies and the banking sector in Libya are required to comply with International Accounting Standards (IASs), the majority of them still comply with the US Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (US GAAP). Moreover, the conclusion that can be drawn from this study is that the enforcement of IASs through the Libyan Accountants and Auditors Association (LAAA), local auditors and the Libyan Stock Market has not achieved its purpose. The results also indicate that the accounting profession in Libya is still in its infancy and still lacks clear structure in order to develop corporate accounting practice and it appears to play only an important role in retaining external influences on the accounting practice. The empirical results of this research show that the Salter and Niswander (1995) criteria (longevity, setting exam and auditors’ opinion on companies’ financial reports) found that the level of professionalism in Libya is below the required standard.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on corporate accounting regulation and practices and the role of the LAAA in the development of corporate accounting in Libya. This paper, therefore, aims to contribute to the literature by examining the corporate accounting regulation in Libya and fills a gap in international accounting research.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Umar Bashir Mir, Swapnil Sharma, Arpan Kumar Kar and Manmohan Prasad Gupta

This paper aims to enlighten stakeholders about critical success factors (CSFs) in developing intelligent autonomous systems (IASs) by integrating artificial intelligence…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to enlighten stakeholders about critical success factors (CSFs) in developing intelligent autonomous systems (IASs) by integrating artificial intelligence (AI) with robotics. It suggests a prioritization hierarchy model for building sustainable ecosystem for developing IASs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the existing literature and on the opinion of 15 experts. All the experts have minimum of eight years of experience in AI and related technologies. The CSF theory is used as a theoretical lens and total interpretative structure modelling (TISM) is used for the prioritization of CSFs.

Findings

Developing countries like India could leverage IASs and associated technologies for solving different societal problems. Policymakers need to develop basic policies regarding data collection, standardized hardware, skilled manpower, funding and start-up culture that can act as building blocks in undertaking sustainable ecosystem for developing IASs and implementing national AI strategy. Clear-cut regulations need to be in place for the proper functioning of the ecosystem. Any technology that can function properly in India has better chances of working at the global level considering the size of the population.

Research limitations/implications

This paper had all its experts from India only, and that makes the limitation of this paper, as there is a possibility that some of the factors identified may not hold same significance in other countries.

Practical implications

Stakeholders will understand the critical factors that are important in developing sustainable ecosystem for IASs and what should be the possible order of activities corresponding to each CSF.

Originality/value

The paper is the first of its kind that has used the CSF theory and TISM methodology for the identification and prioritization of CSFs in developing IASs. Further, eight significant factors, that is, emerging economy multinational enterprises (EMNEs), governance, utility, manpower, capital, software, data and hardware, have come up as the most important factors in integrating AI with robotics in India.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

P.L. Joshi and H. Al‐Bastaki

This study examines the perceptions of 41 corporate chief accountants from Bahrain on the issues relating to the relative importance of international accounting topics in…

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Abstract

This study examines the perceptions of 41 corporate chief accountants from Bahrain on the issues relating to the relative importance of international accounting topics in Bahrain. The study indicates a significant interest of the respondents in internationalizing the accounting curriculum. The topics which received importance rating of over 80% were: foreign investment and decision making, international accounting standards, financial reporting and disclosure, foreign currency transactions and translation, management information system (MIS) for multinational enterprises (MNEs), and consolidations. Results were also compared to a recent study from United States (US) and significant differences were found to exist in respect of several topics. The reasons for the major differences in the perceptions are explained in this paper, some of which may be attributed to cultural as well as environmental differences. The study also found that there is a strong support for adoption of the International Accounting Standards (IASs) because international markets are becoming increasingly important and there exists major differences in accounting principles among the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries themselves. Furthermore, the study also suggests that in view of the similarity in social, economic, and business practices in GCC countries, the highly ranked accounting topics reported in this study should perhaps be incorporated by the accounting departments of universities operating in the GCC region. This will facilitate the process of harmonization of the accounting curriculum in this region.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1022-2529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Z. Jun Lin and Liyan Wang

This paper presents a comparative study of the financial reporting practices of three Chinese companies listed simultaneously in Mainland China (A‐shares) and Hong Kong…

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Abstract

This paper presents a comparative study of the financial reporting practices of three Chinese companies listed simultaneously in Mainland China (A‐shares) and Hong Kong (H‐shares). Their financial statements, prepared based on the accounting and disclosure regulations in China and Hong Kong (or International Accounting Standards, IASs) over the period of 1995‐1998 were studied, including an examination of their corporate structures, and vertical and horizontal comparisons of their primary accounting numbers and key financial ratios. This study demonstrates that significant discrepancies exist for financial information disclosed in terms of Chinese GAAP, Hong Kong GAAP or IASs. In addition, there are notable deviations in financial disclosures among the three companies. The study findings confirm the existence of a substantial gap between the Chinese practices of corporate accounting and financial reporting and the internationally accepted norms. It is suggested that there is an urgent need to promote internationalization of Chinese accounting and improve the understandability and comparability of financial statements released by Chinese listed companies in order to enhance their relevance and usefulness for decision‐making by domestic and overseas investors.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

1 – 10 of 337