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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Rami Mhanna, Adam Blake and Ian Jones

This study aims to recommend initiatives that can be adopted to overcome overtourism in host destinations of mega sport events.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to recommend initiatives that can be adopted to overcome overtourism in host destinations of mega sport events.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a qualitative research design that involves 20 semi-structured interviews with key informant stakeholders of the London 2012 Olympic Games. An exploratory case study approach was used to investigate strategies used to leverage tourism benefits in host destinations, and the authors used thematic analysis to present strategies to overcome overtourism in host cities.

Findings

This study emphasises the need for spreading tourists beyond the host city as a main strategy. To do so, three initiatives are recommended: spreading domestic tourism outside the host city, showcasing destination beyond the host city and promoting regional collaboration.

Practical implications

This research provides tourism practitioners and destination management organisations in host destinations of mega sport events with an advanced strategic insights to capitalise on mega sport events. The authors suggest considering the events as a theme through an event planning process to overcome potential overtourism in unique host cities.

Originality/value

As overtourism has an impact on visited destinations, this study argues that overtourism can be generated by mega sport events. This paper offers an extended insight into overcoming overtourism by implementing strategic event tourism, leveraging initiatives that can be extended in use to reach geographic areas beyond host cities of mega sport events.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Maria J. Grant, Robyn R. Lotto and Ian D. Jones

The study aims to construct an understanding of professional academic writing network structures to inform organisational strategic investment in academic staff development.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to construct an understanding of professional academic writing network structures to inform organisational strategic investment in academic staff development.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal social network analysis is used to examine the personal-networks evident in the publication portfolios of a purposive sample of four international academics across each quartile of the SCOPUS defined area of General Nursing's top 100 authors.

Findings

Trends in the publication portfolios of elite academics across gender, sector and geographic location are presented. In the first years of successful writing for publication, authors collaborate within a single highly connected co-author network. This network will typically expand to include new co-authors, before additional separate co-author collaborations emerge (three- to four- years). Authors experience steady growth in co-author numbers four- to seven- years from first co-authored publication. After a period of rapid expansion, these collaborations coalesce into a smaller number of highly connected groups (eight- to ten- years). Most collaborations occur within the higher education sector and across multiple disciplines including medicine, social sciences and psychology. Male co-authors are disproportionately represented in what is a predominantly female profession.

Practical implications

The development of extended co-author networks, locally, internationally and across the higher education sector, enable authors to attain the marker of achievement required by universities and government funding bodies, namely sustained output of academic publications. Identified trends support the inclusion of investment in academic time and resources in higher education institutions strategic and operational plans to enable academic staff to develop interdisciplinary professional networks. In focussing this investment on gender equality, female academics will experience parity of opportunity in achieving their organisational and personal goals relating to professional academic writing. Medium-term investment may be required before the impact of that investment becomes apparent.

Originality/value

This is the first example of social network analysis used to determine characteristics of professional academic writing portfolios over time. Findings inform the type and range of investment required to facilitate academic staff writing activities, specifically those publishing in the area of General Nursing.

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Brendon Knott, Alan Fyall and Ian Jones

Sport mega-events have received much criticism of late. However, there has been increasing awareness of the brand-related benefits from hosting a sport mega-event, with…

Abstract

Purpose

Sport mega-events have received much criticism of late. However, there has been increasing awareness of the brand-related benefits from hosting a sport mega-event, with their hosting being a deliberate policy for many nations, most notably among emerging nations. One such nation is South Africa, which explicitly stated its nation branding ambitions through the staging of the 2010 FIFA World Cup. Through this single case, this paper aims to identify the unique characteristics of the sport mega-event that were leveraged for benefits of nation branding.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretivist, qualitative study explored the insights of nation brand stakeholders and experts, elicited using in-depth, semi-structured interviews (n = 27) undertaken two to three years after the staging of the event.

Findings

Three characteristics of the 2010 sport mega-event were deemed by stakeholders to be unique in creating nation branding opportunities: the scale of the event that created opportunities for transformational development; the global appeal, connection and attachment of the event; and the symbolic status of the event that was leveraged for internal brand building and public diplomacy. The paper proposes that while sport mega-events provide nation branding opportunities, the extent of these benefits may vary according to the context of the nation brand with lesser-known, troubled or emerging brands seemingly having the most to gain.

Originality/value

While acknowledging the critique of mega-events, this paper highlights a pertinent example of an emerging nation that leveraged the potential of a sport mega-event for nation branding gains. It extends the understanding of sport mega-events and their potential for nation branding.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

IAN JONES

The valuation of interests in land for Inheritance Tax purposes may be relatively straightforward ‘open market’ valuations as at the date of death, or they may not. An…

Abstract

The valuation of interests in land for Inheritance Tax purposes may be relatively straightforward ‘open market’ valuations as at the date of death, or they may not. An actual disposal, either prior or subsequent to death, can produce prima facie useful evidence of value, but such evidence must be viewed in the context of the reliefs offered by ss. 131 to 139 and 191 to 198 of the Inheritance Tax Act 1984. The first in this series of papers examines the situation regarding lifetime transfers which may come into account due to the death of the donor occurring within seven years of making the gift, and develops a strategy for valuers wishing to maximise their use of the reliefs available.

Details

Journal of Valuation, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7480

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Ian B. Blumenstein, J. Eric Maki and John T. Owen

– To advise companies of a recent SEC no-action letter relating to tender and exchange offers for certain debt securities.

Abstract

Purpose

To advise companies of a recent SEC no-action letter relating to tender and exchange offers for certain debt securities.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews various conditions allowing an issuer to use a shortened timeframe in which certain debt tender/exchange offers need be kept open for as few as five business days.

Findings

The abbreviated debt tender/exchange offer structure contemplated by the no-action letter provides a more efficient mechanism for conducting debt tender/exchange offers in certain circumstances.

Practical implications

Issuers conducting a debt tender/exchange offer should consider whether the new abbreviated structure is more effective in achieving their objectives than the more traditional structures.

Originality/value

Practical guidance from experienced securities regulatory lawyers that gives an overview of important developments in debt tender/exchange offer practice.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Ian S.F. Jones

A current estimate of the cost of reducing the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by Ocean Nourishment is provided. A scenario of fertilisation of the ocean…

Abstract

Purpose

A current estimate of the cost of reducing the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by Ocean Nourishment is provided. A scenario of fertilisation of the ocean in regions of excess phosphorous, carried out using a ship to distribute ammonium hydroxide, is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Ocean fertilisation could be deployed to draw down the carbon dioxide already in the atmosphere and store it for millennia in the deep ocean.

Findings

The costs of fertilising the ocean with macronutrient depends mostly on the cost of producing the nutrient and the cost of its delivery. Macronutrient fertilisation has been calculated, for a particular scenario, to cost US$20 per tonne of carbon dioxide emission avoided for 100 years.

Research limitations/implications

There is a collateral benefit of increased fish stocks, which is not considered here. The ocean, plausibly, has the capacity to sequester more than one Gigatonne per year of carbon (∼3.7 Gt CO2/yr) via macronutrient fertilisation.

Practical implications

This modest cost of reducing climate change justifies further research and development of ocean macronutrient fertilisation.

Social implications

The modest cost allows climate change to be addressed without serious economic disruption.

Originality/value

The study reported is a contribution to mitigation of climate change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Peter Jones, Daphne Comfort, Ian Eastwood and David Hillier

States that the idea of grouping a number of cultural, commercial and industrial activities together under the banner of the “creative industries” is relatively new but…

Abstract

States that the idea of grouping a number of cultural, commercial and industrial activities together under the banner of the “creative industries” is relatively new but it has already been the focus of considerable interest, discussion and policy making within the UK. Acknowledges that the government has been keen to promote the creative industries as a major success story and a key element in the knowledge economy. Looks at what is seen to constitute the creative industries, reviews some of the evidence about their contribution to the economy and outlines some of the management challenges and the support and promotion initiatives associated with these industries.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Ian Jones

The latest developments in the use of lasers for welding plastics are reviewed. Lasers were demonstrated as being suitable for welding plastics in 1970. However, it is…

Abstract

The latest developments in the use of lasers for welding plastics are reviewed. Lasers were demonstrated as being suitable for welding plastics in 1970. However, it is only now that they are finding wide application following technical developments in transmission laser welding and ClearWeld™, and the availability of small, economic diode laser systems.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Jed Donoghue and Bruce Tranter

Abstract

Details

Exploring Australian National Identity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-503-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Three senior appointments have been announced in the International Paint Packaging Coatings Division.

Abstract

Three senior appointments have been announced in the International Paint Packaging Coatings Division.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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