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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2020

Ângela Gonçalves, Dina Pereira, João Leitão and Maria del Mar Fuentes

This chapter uses an intellectual capital (IC) qualitative approach for assessing the bio health technologies entrepreneurial ecosystem of a university located in Southern…

Abstract

This chapter uses an intellectual capital (IC) qualitative approach for assessing the bio health technologies entrepreneurial ecosystem of a university located in Southern Europe, aiming to identify the role played by IC in fostering the sustainable success of the entrepreneurial ecosystem. There has been limited research dedicated to deepening the knowledge of the entrepreneurial ecosystems’ dimensions, using an IC lens, in the context of university cities with different dimensions. Small cities may not have some dimensions, so developed, comparing with the ones of the ecosystems of large urban centers. This chapter uses a qualitative approach funded in a case study exploring internal and external stakeholders of a Portuguese entrepreneurial ecosystem, UBImedical, targeted at the bio health sector. The study is part of an exploratory study funded in the scope of a European Project, aiming to explore in a pioneering way the application of the dominant triad of capitals forming IC and, thus, identifying and understanding the dimensions of different entrepreneurial ecosystems. The case study reveals that the IC’s dimensions more critical for the success of the bio health entrepreneurial ecosystems are the structural capital and the relational capital, although human capital is perceived as a basic prerequisite for fostering the entrepreneurial ecosystem’s performance. The results are funded in primary and qualitative data collected from the interviews developed to previously identified external and internal stakeholders of this type of entrepreneurial ecosystem under study.

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A Guide to Planning and Managing Open Innovative Ecosystems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-409-6

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2015

Alvaro Luiz Neuenfeldt Júnior, Julio Cezar Mairesse Siluk, Marlon Soliman, Elpídio Oscar Benitez Nara and Liane Mahlmann Kipper

The purpose of this paper is to study the level of importance existing among the indicators that were previously defined for a Performance Measurement Systems (PMS) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the level of importance existing among the indicators that were previously defined for a Performance Measurement Systems (PMS) and are relative to franchises in Brazil, using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) methodology, together with a series of tests, which are responsible by verifying the degree of reliability, robustness and stability of the parameters used and the results obtained. As a result, the author suggests that the diagnosing of the five delimited indicators have different relevance assigned to them.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews extant literatures in Franchise, PMS, Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM), in specific the theory about AHP.

Findings

The authors found that it was possible justified, for both the relative and the evaluative method, that the I3 was the main point of the system and, as a consequence, be considered as priority when talking about sectorial development of franchises in Brazil. As for the other indicators, even being located in a level lower than I3, they must be taken into contemplation in these measurements, however, with a relatively inferior importance degree.

Practical implications

It was possible to better comprehend which economics and non-economic factors selected have a more predominance in the Brazilian franchise context, according to characteristics of the companies present.

Originality/value

The absence of scientific papers that describe the relevance level of the main factors that influence in the Brazilian franchise system.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2010

Federica Marino‐Francis and Anne Worrall‐Davies

The concept of social inclusion features prominently in current policy and practice developments in mental health services. The Social Exclusion Unit (2006) highlighted…

Abstract

The concept of social inclusion features prominently in current policy and practice developments in mental health services. The Social Exclusion Unit (2006) highlighted the need for mental health day services to promote inclusion and participation, by integrating with the wider community, and by supporting and encouraging users to access opportunities in the local community. The Leeds i3 (inspire, improve, include) project aimed to modernise local mental health day services accordingly. The aim of our study was to develop and validate a measure of social inclusion to be used in mental health day services in Leeds. The underlying assumption was that recent changes in mental health day service provision would substantially improve social inclusion of the service users.The social inclusion questionnaire was developed through extensive iterative consultation with mental health service users and staff, and its reliability was proven using test‐retest statistics. It was shown to be a simple, inexpensive, user‐friendly and repeatable measure that could be used routinely by mental health day services. Factor analysis of the questionnaire showed that social inclusion had seven important components. We suggest that these components form a useful basis for discussion with service users, as well as for planning and evaluating services.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Jacob Barling, Rhonda Halpin and Michael Levy

There is little literature on patient satisfaction related to prisoner health services; the little that does exist refers to specific services, or to sub‐groups of…

Abstract

There is little literature on patient satisfaction related to prisoner health services; the little that does exist refers to specific services, or to sub‐groups of prisoner‐patients. We describe a general assessment of prisoner health services conducted on two separate occasions each with a collective sample of 210 participants, three years apart, using the same instrument. We utilised the World Health Organization Rapid Cluster Sample Survey on both occasions. We conclude that prisoners are interested informants for the health services provided to them. They have valid concerns about the confidentiality of their medical records. Programs and work routines have major impacts on accessibility of prison‐based health services. Given the lack of choice in service‐providers for prisoners, greater flexibility is required by health and custodial agencies to accommodate these two competing areas of activity. We demonstrated that a health service targeting an ‘at risk’ population can respond to inadequacies in service provision. Finally, we confirmed that the World Health Organization Rapid Cluster Sample Survey methodology is an efficient and effective means of assessing health services to discrete populations.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 1 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Claude‐Hélène Mayer and Christian Boness

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into cross‐cultural conflicts and their management in ecclesiastical organizations in Tanzania. It aims at increasing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into cross‐cultural conflicts and their management in ecclesiastical organizations in Tanzania. It aims at increasing the understanding of these complexities from an emic perspective of employees with a Christian background, thereby providing in‐depth information on the topic. These new insights provide fresh ideas for further research on this topic in the Tanzanian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were selected from a more comprehensive case study carried out in multiple governmental, educational, ecclesiastical and economic organizations in Tanzania. The case study was based on phenomenological and interpretative paradigms and hermeneutical interpretations using qualitative methodology including in‐depth interviews and observation during field stays, as well as documentary and secondary analysis.

Findings

The findings show that senior management staff of ecclesiastical organizations function as mediators for conflicting parties to regain harmony and peace through third‐party intervention and spiritual self‐development. Mediation in ecclesiastical organizations is mainly used in relationship conflicts, employment conflicts and church re‐structuring processes. It supports the resolution of value conflicts between the conflict parties and the environment and at the same time re‐constructs religious and Christian values and concepts, such as the concept of “Shalom” and “creating lobe” and thereby re‐enforces spiritual integrity and the reality of the church.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are not generalizable and are limited to this specific research context. Findings should be verified by follow‐up studies which expand the content, the context and the methodological approach of this study. These findings should be viewed as exploratory research findings and as highly contextual and sample‐bound.

Practical implications

The paper describes the practical implications for further research relating to future research topics for researchers interested in the field of cross‐cultural conflict management in ecclesiastical organizations in Tanzania.

Originality/value

The authors present original data and provide new insights into managing conflicts in Tanzanian ecclesiastical organizations through mediation.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Olga Khokhotva and Iciar Elexpuru Albizuri

The study aims at exploring the perspective of three English as a Foreign Language teachers after their year-long involvement in the Lesson Study project in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims at exploring the perspective of three English as a Foreign Language teachers after their year-long involvement in the Lesson Study project in the context of Kazakhstan in order to capture and list any perceived changes in teachers’ educational beliefs over the period of the Lesson Study intervention. The main argument of the study suggests that the school-based Lesson Study initiative is conducive to triggering changes in teachers’ educational beliefs, and thus, might lead to positive changes in school culture in Kazakhstani schools. Shaped following Hill et al., (1982) in Swales, 1990 hour-glass model of a research project (Swales, 1990), the article reflects the third concluding part of the Ph.D. thesis focusing on the implementation of the Lesson Study methodology in Kazakhstan.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts the qualitative research design and follows the narrative inquiry methodology. The three narrative interviews (Bauer, 1996) are utilized as the main method of data collection. The data were analyzed as text following a general inductive approach (Thomas, 2003), where emerging themes were identified employing data reduction and further sub-categorized through the conceptual and theoretical lenses of the study. The emerged categories reflecting the perceived shifts in teachers’ educational beliefs were dialectically linked to implications for school culture in Kazakhstani schools.

Findings

As data suggest, the respondents’ active engagement in the Lesson Study professional learning community and exercising leadership through implementing changes in their classroom practice has made a positive impact on teachers’ rethinking their teaching practice, attitudes to students and their learning, collegiality, and professional self-identification. We conclude that, if organized properly, Lesson Study has enormous potential to facilitate changes of teachers’ educational beliefs: from direct transmission beliefs toward constructivist beliefs, from restricted professionals’ beliefs toward reflective practitioner beliefs and attitudes, toward beliefs in the power of student’s voice, and collaboration. Those shifts are linked to establishing a more positive, child-friendly and rights-based school culture with teachers’ shared visions and capacity for innovation.

Research limitations/implications

We acknowledge that the abundance of the reported positive changes or perceived shifts in teachers’ thinking might not be the indicators of actual changes in their beliefs. We emphasize that the study was carried in a controlled context, i.e. the three ELF teachers were constantly supported, and the teacher talk was systematically guided by a trained facilitator. Warned by Giroux et al. (1999), we are aware of the major challenge of the fundamental assumption of critical pedagogy that teachers are willing and able to undertake “the practice of analyzing their practice” (p. 27) voluntarily. Thus, the question remains open: if the facilitator’s support is eliminated, will the results point to the occurrence of the disruption and disorientation as a necessary condition for the beliefs change?

Originality/value

Carried out in the largely overlooked by the academic literature context of the Reform at Scale (Wilson et al., 2013) in Kazakhstan and building on the original combination of conceptual and theoretical lenses, the research contributes to the academic literature by connecting teachers’ educational beliefs, Lesson Study and school culture. The findings might be of value for the school leaders, educators, teacher trainers, and policymakers to advocate Lesson Study as a systematic approach to the whole-school improvement, as a tool to facilitate positive changes in school culture, as well as give impetus to studies employing the school culture perspective in developing Lesson Study impact evaluation tools.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Peter Bettess and Jacqueline A. Bettess

A profile solver which factorizes the profile matrix K into the form LDLT, is described. D is a diagonal matrix and L is a lower triangular matrix. LT is stored by…

Abstract

A profile solver which factorizes the profile matrix K into the form LDLT, is described. D is a diagonal matrix and L is a lower triangular matrix. LT is stored by columns, using a steering vector, to locate the elements. In addition a fixity vector is used. This indicates which degrees of freedom are free and which are fixed. A main program uses a random number generator to set up test data. Full listings are given, together with information on how to get a copy of the program.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Romaric Servajean-Hilst

The purpose of this paper is to provide some keys to understand and manage the dynamic of client-supplier innovation cooperation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide some keys to understand and manage the dynamic of client-supplier innovation cooperation.

Design/methodology/approach

The results presented in this paper are based on a mixed methods approach that combines interviews with practitioners, quantitative inquiry on 160 client-supplier innovation cooperations and 18-month ethnography within an Innovation-Purchasing department.

Findings

At the first stage of a relationship, when trust and familiarity are low, unstructured organization has to be avoided and elaborated partnership privileged. Later in a relationship, the power balance increases, so do trust and familiarity. In case of a power balance in large favor of the client, elaborated partnership presents the best performance in the first phases of the innovation project, and the unstructured organization allows better performance in the phases around market launch. If the power balance is favorable to the supplier, the exclusive partnership organization gives the best results for the relationship. Later, when trust and familiarity attain the highest levels, and when the power is balanced within the couple, elaborated partnership is best suited from design to industrialization phases. In upstream phases, project-type organizations can be substituted to exclusive partnership: both allow the relationship to reach the highest scores.

Originality/value

The paper offers levers for managing innovation cooperation at macro and micro levels, taking into account the impact of the client-supplier relationship.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

B.S. Dhillon and A.R.M. Fashandi

Points out the steadily growing role of computers in the industrial sector. Highlights some accidents involving robots and touches on safeguards which have been…

Abstract

Points out the steadily growing role of computers in the industrial sector. Highlights some accidents involving robots and touches on safeguards which have been introduced. Presents reliability and availability analysis of a robot machine/system having a redundant safety system. Formulas for system reliability, steady state availability, and mean time to failure are developed. Selective plots of the resulting formulas are shown.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Robert Kleyle, Andre de Korvin and Khondkar Karim

In this paper we propose a strategy for investing in new companies for which there is relatively little hard data available. We use fuzzy set theory to represent these new…

Abstract

In this paper we propose a strategy for investing in new companies for which there is relatively little hard data available. We use fuzzy set theory to represent these new companies as finite fuzzy subsets of established companies for which there is a history of investment data. A fuzzy set is also used to represent the economic environment in which the proposed new investments will be made. From this fuzzy information we construct a fuzzy expected return for each new investment under consideration. These expected returns are then defuzzified, and those proposed investments whose defuzzified expected returns fail to meet some specified criteria are discarded. An investment strategy is then proposed for investing available capital in those new companies that meet the criteria.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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