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Article

D. McLean and I. Monro

Some aircraft runway collisions are described first to illustrate some common features of a runway incursion (RI) incident. Then, using the FAA definition of runway…

Abstract

Some aircraft runway collisions are described first to illustrate some common features of a runway incursion (RI) incident. Then, using the FAA definition of runway incursion, some data relating to RI incidents are presented to show that both RIs and incursion rates are growing steadily in the USA. Data for UK airport operations also indicate that the incursion rates in Britain are of the same order. Hence there is a need for some form of RI prevention. Most of the technological prevention systems available, or being developed, are briefly described before the paper concludes with the suggestion that effective prevention may be more swiftly obtained by improving airside signage and training for airport workers who use runways and taxiways in their vehicles.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 76 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

C.C. Ko and C.D. Cheng

The use of the Internet for Web‐based teaching and learning is fast becoming a reality. However, since it is difficult to verify the identity of the student through a…

Abstract

The use of the Internet for Web‐based teaching and learning is fast becoming a reality. However, since it is difficult to verify the identity of the student through a simple user ID and password system on the client side, performance evaluation through test and examination through the Internet is still in its infancy. To overcome this main hurdle, a system has been designed and developed where a camera at the client computer is used to capture the student’s face and posture at random intervals during the test. The captured images are stored at the server and can be used to verify the identity of the person taking the test if the need arises. The system developed has been successfully used in a randomized multiple choice test in a course on analog and digital signals involving 450 students.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article

Jean Hatton and Surya Monro

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relevance of intersectional theory (Crenshaw, 1989; Winker and Degele, 2011) in understanding how youth workers name…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relevance of intersectional theory (Crenshaw, 1989; Winker and Degele, 2011) in understanding how youth workers name themselves in their everyday lives. An intersectional approach will assist youth workers in developing a clear understanding of their own self as they work with young people from diverse and challenging backgrounds.

Design/methodology/approach

This research takes a qualitative approach, using in-depth interviews with cisgendered, female lesbian, gay and bisexual respondents of different social class, religion, ethnicity and age about their everyday experiences.

Findings

Intracategorical and anticategorical intersectional approaches (McCall, 2005) were used to assist in understanding how these professionals chose to name themselves in their personal and working lives.

Originality/value

The youth work literature, although focussed on the importance of issues of diversity, has not engaged with the ideas of intersectionality. The focus on intersections of sexuality, as well as social class, religion, ethnicity and age, fills another gap in the literature where less attention has been paid to the “category” of sexuality (Richardson and Monro, 2012; Wright, 2016b). These findings will be useful for youth workers and for practitioners and their trainers from a range of professional backgrounds such as therapists, social workers, teachers and health care practitioners.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article

It may be noted with great satisfaction that the Local Government Board has considered the question of, and examined as far as possible in all its bearings—chemical…

Abstract

It may be noted with great satisfaction that the Local Government Board has considered the question of, and examined as far as possible in all its bearings—chemical, hygienic, and commercial—the processes of bleaching flour by chemical means, and of the addition to flour of foreign substances that are euphemistically referred to by certain persons as “improvers.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Local Government Board, Whitehall, S.W., 9th February, 1917. PUBLIC HEALTH (REGULATIONS AS TO FOOD) ACT, 1907. Amending Regulations with respect to Cream. SIR, I am…

Abstract

Local Government Board, Whitehall, S.W., 9th February, 1917. PUBLIC HEALTH (REGULATIONS AS TO FOOD) ACT, 1907. Amending Regulations with respect to Cream. SIR, I am directed by the President of the Local Government Board to transmit to you the enclosed copies of an Order which has been made amending the Public Health (Milk and Cream) Regulations, 1912.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part

Toni Samek

The purpose of this chapter is to provide a personal-professional reflection on Canadian author Toni Samek’s learning since publication of her 2007 book project entitled…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to provide a personal-professional reflection on Canadian author Toni Samek’s learning since publication of her 2007 book project entitled Librarianship and human rights: A twenty-first century guide.

Methodology/approach

The reflection, written in first-person and accessible terms appealing to a broad readership, is structured by the following sections: introduction; privilege and position; sobering experiences; the risk factor; a common project; unease; expectation; and, closing thoughts.

Practical implications

This endeavor encourages contributors to the field of library and information studies to situate their work within micro (individuals), meso (institutions), and macro (society) level understandings of privilege and power, including respect for the compassion and conviction demonstrated by street-level library and information workers who may never be rewarded for their good fights, or worse, may suffer loss(es) because of them.

Originality/value

This reflective work affirms the book’s original dedication in Librarianship and human rights: A twenty-first century guide to the many courageous library and information workers throughout the world and through the generations who have taken personal and professional risk to push for social change, as well as the enduring value of librarianship and human rights as a common project and one that involves both learning and unlearning. Librarianship and human rights: A twenty-first century guide was used as an example, when in 2007, activist librarian proposed the subject heading “critical librarianship” to the Cataloging and Support Office of the Library of Congress. This reflection adds to that case.

Details

Perspectives on Libraries as Institutions of Human Rights and Social Justice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-057-2

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Book part

Daniela Jauk

In this chapter, I use the issue of violence against transgender individuals to explore the (limited) meanings of gender within the context of the Commission on the Status…

Abstract

Purpose

In this chapter, I use the issue of violence against transgender individuals to explore the (limited) meanings of gender within the context of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) in the United Nations (UN).

Design/methodology/approach

Using constructivist grounded theory and institutional ethnography I bring together field research from two ethnographic qualitative research projects I have been pursuing from 2008 to 2012; I studied transgender communities in the US and the CSW through their annual meetings in the New York Headquarters of the UN.

Findings

I first demonstrate the severity of transphobic violence as a global public health problem. I proceed to report highlights of global LGBT activism, such as the Yogyakarta Principles and the latest developments within the Human Rights Council of the UN for the first time addressing global LGBT violence in 2011. I then examine the silencing of transgender experiences in the CSW by exploring the contested use of the term gender over the last two decades of intergovernmental negotiations.

Originality/value

This study highlights the need to broaden the conceptualization of violence and gender violence which has important theoretical and policy implications. Linking micro experiences of violent victimization in local trans-communities to the macro context of gender violence in global gender equality policy development is crucial to the advancement of human rights.

Details

Gendered Perspectives on Conflict and Violence: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-110-6

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Article

The connotations, associations, custom and usages of a name often give to it an importance that far outweighs its etymological significance. Even with personal surnames or…

Abstract

The connotations, associations, custom and usages of a name often give to it an importance that far outweighs its etymological significance. Even with personal surnames or the name of a business. A man may use his own name but not if by so doing it inflicts injury on the interests and business of another person of the same name. After a long period of indecision, it is now generally accepted that in “passing off”, there is no difference between the use of a man's own name and any other descriptive word. The Courts will only intervene, however, when a personal name has become so much identified with a well‐known business as to be necessarily deceptive when used without qualification by anyone else in the same trade; i.e., only in rare cases. In the early years, the genesis of goods and trade protection, fraud was a necessary ingredient of “passing off”, an intent to deceive, but with the merging off Equity with the Common Law, the equitable rule that interference with “property” did not require fraudulent intent was practised in the Courts. First applying to trade marks, it was extended to trade names, business signs and symbols and business generally. Now it is unnecessary to prove any intent to deceive, merely that deception was probable, or that the plaintiff had suffered actual damage. The equitable principle was not established without a struggle, however, and the case of “Singer” Sewing Machines (1877) unified the two streams of law but not before it reached the House of Lords. On the way up, judical opinions differed; in the Court of Appeal, fraud was considered necessary—the defendant had removed any conception of fraud by expressingly declaring in advertisements that his “Singer” machines were manufactured by himself—so the Court found for him, but the House of Lords considered the name “Singer” was in itself a trade mark and there was no more need to prove fraud in the case of a trade name than a trade mark; Hence, the birth of the doctrine that fraud need not be proved, but their Lordships showed some hesitation in accepting property rights for trade names. If the name used is merely descriptive of goods, there can be no cause for action, but if it connotes goods manufactured by one firm or prepared from a formula or compsitional requirements prescribed by and invented by a firm or is the produce of a region, then others have no right to use it. It is a question of fact whether the name is the one or other. The burden of proof that a name or term in common use has become associated with an individual product is a heavy one; much heavier in proving an infringement of a trade mark.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Pooja R. Singhania and Kasturi Senray

Starchy foods have been emphasized in the diet for reducing hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. However, all starch containing foods respond differently, depending upon…

Abstract

Purpose

Starchy foods have been emphasized in the diet for reducing hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. However, all starch containing foods respond differently, depending upon various other factors in food such as the amylose:amylopectin ratio, co‐ingredients, methods of cooking, etc. which also impact its metabolic response. During days of fast, in India, potato and sago are the most commonly used food to provide quick source of energy. The purpose of this paper is to determine the functional and nutritional quality of fasting foods such as potato and sago, having higher amylopectin content, with respect to their relative glycemic and insulin response in normal healthy volunteers.

Design/methodology/approach

The postprandial glycemic response to boiled potato and sago khichdi in relation to equal quantity of bread (reference) was compared using Relative Glycemic Potency (RGP) represented as the Glycemic Bread Equivalent (GBE) of foods. Five clinically healthy subjects were fed 100 g of test foods and standard, and their blood glucose and insulin response was recorded at fasting (0 min) and at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min.

Findings

It was found that both potato and sago khichdi produced peak glucose response at 30 min and levels returned to baseline within 60 min. The higher amylopectin content which facilitates faster absorption from the gastro‐intestinal tract and into the cell results in the total area under the curve (AUC) glycemic response to potato and sago khichdi to be significantly lower than that of bread (p < 0.05). The total AUC insulin response to potato (p <0.05) and sago khichdi was also lower than that of bread.

Practical implications

Therefore, starch‐based foods rich in amylopectin lead to quicker absorption of sugar to supply the energy to the energy‐deprived cells common in fasting condition.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the starch present in these fasting foods is typically characterized by a higher amylopectin:amylose ratio.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

We publish this month a report of a case which was recently heard by the Stipendiary at Middlesbrough, in which a Co‐operative Society was summoned for being in possession…

Abstract

We publish this month a report of a case which was recently heard by the Stipendiary at Middlesbrough, in which a Co‐operative Society was summoned for being in possession of meat which was condemned as tuberculous and as unfit for human food. In view of the magisterial decision, it is of interest to review the facts of the case. It appears that Inspector WATSON visited the defendant society's slaughter‐house, and that he saw there several carcases hanging up and an employee dressing a carcase which was obviously tuberculous. In reply to Inspector WATSON'S demand, the internal organs of the animal were produced and were found to be covered with tuberculous nodules. Dr. DINGLE, the Medical Officer of Health, accompanied by Mr. G. ANDERSON, the Chief Sanitary Inspector, subsequently visited the slaughter‐house and agreed that the carcase was undoubtedly tuberculous and quite unfit for human food. Accordingly they seized the carcase which was subsequently condemned by order of the magistrate. When the defendant society was summoned before the Court, the counsel for the prosecution pointed out that when Inspector ANDERSON visited the slaughter‐house he asked the slaughterer why he had continued dressing the carcase when it was obvious to anyone that the meat was tuberculous. The condition of the carcase was not disputed by the defendants, but it was contended that the slaughter‐house was under the control of the manager and that no carcase would be removed until it had been inspected by him. In view of this contention for the defence, the magistrate held that it had not been proved that the meat was intended for human food, despite the fact that the diseased internal organs had been removed, and that the carcase had been dressed as if it were intended for use as food. If the decision in all such cases rested upon evidence of a similar nature, it is obvious that the Public Health Acts would become inefficient and useless, inasmuch as it would only be necessary for a defendant to state that any diseased meat found in his slaughter‐house was awaiting the inspection of the manager, and then the law could not interfere. Such a condition of things would obviously be unsatisfactory. The Stipendiary observed that the prosecution was justified, and commended the ability with which the Health Department carried on its work.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

1 – 10 of 114