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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Winston G. Lewis, Kit Fai Pun and Terrence R.M. Lalla

This paper presents the main findings of an empirical study that investigates the effects of the “soft” and “hard” criteria of total quality management (TQM) in four ISO…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents the main findings of an empirical study that investigates the effects of the “soft” and “hard” criteria of total quality management (TQM) in four ISO 9001 certified small and medium‐sized enterprises (SME) in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T).

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted an ethnographic research approach, and used the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to determine the extent to which these criteria were implemented at the point of ISO 9001 certification. By complementing the literature review, a hierarchy framework of TQM implementation via ISO 9001 was developed. The framework comprised three levels of criteria, sub‐criteria and elements which determine the effectiveness of TQM implementation in SME. Inputs from 16 evaluators including senior executives and representatives from the studied companies were invited. The combined opinions from evaluators were used to identify and prioritize these criteria and components.

Findings

The results showed that the “soft” criteria were implemented less than the “hard” criteria in SME. The AHP findings supplement the body of knowledge existing in compliance requirements of ISO 9001 and provide insights on how SME perceive the importance of “soft” versus “hard” criteria in TQM implementation. These findings highlight the need to align SMEs' prevailing quality culture with top management and considers it as one of the focal compliance requirements for future revisions of the ISO 9001:2000 Standard.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the ethnographic nature of the study, it was possible to obtain data from only four SME.

Practical implications

SME in T&T may apply the findings of the empirical research to design, implement and continually improve their quality management system

Originality/value

This paper makes a contribution to the body of knowledge in the field of quality management in a region where such work is limited. It adds value by empirically measures TQM implementation by determining the extent to which its criteria is implemented in ISO 9001 certified SME.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

I. Moch and B.H. Kleiner

Considers the need for company managers to maintain awareness oftechnological innovation in order to remain competitive in internationalmarkets. Examines several areas in…

Abstract

Considers the need for company managers to maintain awareness of technological innovation in order to remain competitive in international markets. Examines several areas in which new technology can be critical to a company′s success, some of the methods managers can use to stay in touch with technological innovations, and cites some examples of such methods as employed in successful organizations today. Concludes that the methods used will depend on the individual nature of the company.

Details

Work Study, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

Mary Sue Love

An exploratory empirical examination was conducted to determine if collectivists experienced a higher psychological sense of community at work than individualists.

Abstract

Purpose

An exploratory empirical examination was conducted to determine if collectivists experienced a higher psychological sense of community at work than individualists.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from 264 non‐supervisory respondents. Correlation and regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship among individualism‐collectivism and psychological sense of community at work, while controlling for age, gender, marital status, education, and position.

Findings

Results showed that while controlling for demographic and job related variables, collectivists experience higher levels of psychological sense of community at work than individualists.

Research limitations/implications

Because this investigation was a cross‐sectional research design, causality cannot be determined although reverse causality is unlikely due to individualism‐collectivism being a relatively stable individual difference variable.

Practical implications

In the uncertainty of our current economic and labor landscape, collectivists may feel more secure and ride the waves better than individualists. Organizations should work to communicate values that encourage building a sense of community among their employees. Managers should include relationship building with subordinates among their many daily tasks.

Originality/value

The paper examines an under‐researched area by incorporating concepts from the field of community psychology to examine individualism‐collectivism as one predictor of which individuals may better navigate the turbulent nature of the current job landscape.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

James L. Price

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool…

Abstract

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool, seeks to improve measurement in the study of work organizations and to facilitate the teaching of introductory courses in this subject. Focuses solely on work organizations, that is, social systems in which members work for money. Defines measurement and distinguishes four levels: nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio. Selects specific measures on the basis of quality, diversity, simplicity and availability and evaluates each measure for its validity and reliability. Employs a set of 38 concepts ‐ ranging from “absenteeism” to “turnover” as the handbook’s frame of reference. Concludes by reviewing organizational measurement over the past 30 years and recommending future measurement reseach.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Verdiana Chieffi, Marco Pichierri, Alessandro M. Peluso, Cristiana Collu and Gianluigi Guido

This study examines the effect of both objective knowledge (i.e., what arts audience members actually know about art) and subjective knowledge (i.e., what arts audiences…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the effect of both objective knowledge (i.e., what arts audience members actually know about art) and subjective knowledge (i.e., what arts audiences members think they know about art) on their propensity for experience-sharing (i.e., the tendency to share art-related experiences with other individuals). In addition, the study examines the role of culture (i.e., whether arts audiences belong to an individualistic or collectivistic culture) on the above-mentioned relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered through a field survey at a large contemporary art museum in Italy, conducted via a structured questionnaire and analyzed using multiple regression analysis.

Findings

Results indicate that both subjective and objective knowledge positively affect arts audiences’ propensity for experience-sharing, such as talking to others about a visit to an art gallery. Moreover, such effects appear to vary depending on culture: objective knowledge seems to positively influence experience-sharing when audiences belong to collectivistic cultures, whereas subjective knowledge seems to positively influence experience-sharing when they belong to individualistic cultures.

Practical implications

The study’s findings could motivate arts managers to emphasize the implementation of international communication strategies aimed at reinforcing arts audiences’ subjective and objective knowledge since these variables are positively associated with their propensity for experience-sharing with others.

Originality/value

This is the first study to assess the effects of objective and subjective knowledge, alongside the cultural dimensions of individualism and collectivism, on arts audiences’ propensity for experience-sharing.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Moch. Doddy Ariefianto, Irwan Trinugroho, Evan Lau and Bruno S. Sergi

This study aims to cover an important yet largely under-explored topic: the dynamic process of bank liquidity management in a vast developing economy by considering pool…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to cover an important yet largely under-explored topic: the dynamic process of bank liquidity management in a vast developing economy by considering pool of funds hypothesis, signaling hypothesis and risk management hypothesis.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply the dynamic common correlated effect (DCCE) method with an error correction model format to a long panel datasets of 84 Indonesian banks from January 2003 to August 2019, resulting in 16,800 observations.

Findings

The authors obtain convincing evidence of dynamic liquidity management with an error correction mechanism. The time needed to adjust to a liquidity shock ranges from 2.5 to 3.5 months. The empirical results strongly support the pool of funds and signaling hypotheses, whereas risk management motive appears to have secondary importance.

Practical implications

The regulator should also encourage banks to diversify liquidity management to include interbank money market and off-balance-sheet instruments. The current condition shows that bank liquidity management is strongly correlated with intermediation dynamics and thus is contracyclical. Banks could end up with tight liquidity in a booming economy, which would pose a severe risk to their financial standing.

Originality/value

To authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to analyze bank liquidity management behavior empirically using a panel error correction mechanism. Here, the authors also try to combine a practitioner perspective with a scientific one.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2017

Jean M. Bartunek and Elise B. Jones

We explore how scholarly understandings of and the practice of organizational transformation have evolved since Bartunek and Louis’s (1988) Research in Organizational…

Abstract

We explore how scholarly understandings of and the practice of organizational transformation have evolved since Bartunek and Louis’s (1988) Research in Organizational Change and Development chapter. While Bartunek and Louis hoped to see strategy scholarship and OD approaches to transformation inform each other, strategy literature has drifted away from transformation toward more continuous change. OD practice has focused on the implementation of its own versions of transformation through Large Group Interventions, Appreciative Inquiry, the new dialogic OD, and Theory U. Based on a discussion of Theory U, we call attention to the importance of individuals as an important source of new ideas in understanding and practicing large-scale change.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-436-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Abbas J. Ali, Monle Lee, Yi‐Ching Hsieh and Krish Krishnan

Individualism collectivism measures, along with decision styles, are examined in Taiwan. About 600 questionnaires were distributed directly to employees with managerial…

Abstract

Individualism collectivism measures, along with decision styles, are examined in Taiwan. About 600 questionnaires were distributed directly to employees with managerial positions in private, public, and mixed enter prises in the capital, Taipei. In general, Taiwanese were found to be more collectivist than individualistic. Participants displayed a strong preference for consultative and participative styles and determined that these two styles were the most effective in practice. Further more, participants indicated that their immediate supervisors were mostly consultative and autocratic.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

James G. March, Richard M. Burton, Peter Frost, Barry Staw, Anne Huff, David M. Boje, Larry E. Pate, Michael Moch, Steven Kerr, Ray Zammuto, David Whetten and Dawn (Pondy) Mulligan

Some of Lou Pondy′s closest colleagues were invited to submitletters and articles, as a starting point for this special issue. Manyletters were received from leading…

Abstract

Some of Lou Pondy′s closest colleagues were invited to submit letters and articles, as a starting point for this special issue. Many letters were received from leading scholars at some of the most respected institutions in the world, capturing Lou′s human qualities and his unique analytic style. A selection of these letters are included here.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Muayyad Jabri

Draws attention to the value of myths for therapeutic purposes; cleansing oneself of addiction to theory. Espouses the need for moving beyond the rigidity of types and…

Abstract

Draws attention to the value of myths for therapeutic purposes; cleansing oneself of addiction to theory. Espouses the need for moving beyond the rigidity of types and quantification of change. Attempts to loosen these types and to prepare the ground for their consideration side by side with myths. Discusses implications for learning and communication.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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