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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Hyejin Kim and Hao Xu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the way the message source and presence of positive social cues influence the evaluations (attitude toward the corporate social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the way the message source and presence of positive social cues influence the evaluations (attitude toward the corporate social responsibility (CSR) message and company, and word-of-mouth intention to support the campaign) of the decreased use CSR messages on Facebook.

Design/methodology/approach

In the context of Facebook, this study adopted 2 (message source: a CSR message in a sponsored ad format vs a CSR message posted by another Facebook user) × 2 (social cue: highly salient, positive social cues vs no social cues) factorial experimental design.

Findings

The main effects of message source types and presence of positive social cues on decreased usage CSR campaigns proved to be effective in generating better consumer responses to the company and campaign.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are expected to advance the CSR literature by offering a detailed understanding of CSR campaigns that discourage consumption of the company’s own product to support a social cause. It is suggested to test the effects with other CSR examples to increase the ability to generalize the results further.

Practical implications

The results suggest campaign strategies on social media for public relations practitioners and corporate managers who work for companies conducting social responsibility campaigns that discourage consumption of their own products.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the CSR literature by examining the concept of CSR campaigns that advocate decreased usage, which has received scant scholarly attention to date.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2021

Hyejin Bang, Dongwon Choi, Sukki Yoon, Tae Hyun Baek and Yeonshin Kim

Prosocial advertisers widely use assertive messages to encourage prosocial attitudes and behaviors, but ironically, assertive messages may cause reactance. By applying…

Abstract

Purpose

Prosocial advertisers widely use assertive messages to encourage prosocial attitudes and behaviors, but ironically, assertive messages may cause reactance. By applying cultural theories and the reciprocity principle, this study aims to observe whether consumers’ responses to assertive messages hold across culturally different audiences (Americans vs South Koreans) and different consumption situations (price discount vs no discount).

Design/methodology/approach

American and Korean participants take part in three experimental studies examining the interactions of nationality, price discounts and assertive messaging for influencing consumer responses, first to a prosocial ad encouraging recycling (Study 1), the second for a campaign requesting donations for disadvantaged children (Study 2) and the third to prosocial messages encouraging water conservation (Study 3).

Findings

The three experiments strongly support the moderating role of price discounts and cultural backgrounds in the persuasiveness of assertive prosocial messages. American consumers generally dislike assertive messages, but feel reciprocal obligations if marketers include price discounts, whereas South Korean consumers accept both assertive and nonassertive messages without resistance, and discounts have no effects on persuasion.

Research limitations/implications

The findings make two key contributions to the literature and to prosocial advertising practices. First, although many corporations have adopted philanthropic strategies, few researchers have examined how specific consumption contexts determine the effectiveness of prosocial persuasion. The findings show how price discounts and message framing potentially alter the effectiveness of prosocial messages across Eastern and Western cultures. Second, assertive language evokes reactance, but the findings suggest that reactive responses to prosocial advertising are culture-specific.

Practical implications

International nonprofit organizations and brands using philanthropic strategies might use the guidelines of this study for tailoring strategic, practical prosocial messages that will appeal to consumers from diverse cultural backgrounds. In particular, pro-environmental and charity campaigns targeting North American or Western European populations may consider bundling discounts into promotions to evoke reciprocity.

Originality/value

Findings provide novel implications for social marketers regarding on how to couple message assertiveness and price discounts to maximize the success of prosocial messages in different cultures.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2016

Helen S. Koo, Dawn Michaelson, Karla Teel, Dong-Joo Kim, Hyejin Park and Minseo Park

The purpose of this study is to investigate potential users’ preferences and expectations for fabric-based wearable e-nose system designs in order to develop painless and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate potential users’ preferences and expectations for fabric-based wearable e-nose system designs in order to develop painless and non-invasive monitoring systems for diabetes.

Design/methodology/approach

After developing a fabric-based wearable sensor, this study used an online survey with a mixture of closed- and open-ended questions about people’s desires and preferences for use-contexts, product types, design styles, and other key design factors.

Findings

This study investigated the preferences and expectations on designs of wearable e-nose systems for diabetes. The results showed that designers and developers need to consider important design components including sizes, shapes, and colors for practical wearable e-nose system designs. There were strong positive and significant correlations between participant characteristics and preferred wearable e-nose system design factors.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could compare differences between different age groups with different types of diabetes.

Practical implications

Understanding these differences will help designers and marketers target consumers and create diverse designs with different versions for success in the market.

Originality/value

There is lack of research for considering designs of wearable monitoring systems for diabetes. This research will be the first research to understand design preferences and expectations for developing wearable e-nose monitoring systems for diabetes.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2015

Hyejin Yoon

This study attempts to investigate how electronic Word-of-Mouth (eWOM), consisting of (1) opinion seeking, (2) opinion giving, and (3) opinion passing, influences…

Abstract

This study attempts to investigate how electronic Word-of-Mouth (eWOM), consisting of (1) opinion seeking, (2) opinion giving, and (3) opinion passing, influences consumers’ purchasing intentions for tourism services on Social Networking Sites (SNSs). Two hundred and seventy three American college students participate in a self-administered survey concerning their use of SNSs and ways of making online recommendations. Based on four hierarchical regression analyses, this study finds that both opinion seeking and opinion passing significantly influence respondents’ purchasing intentions. Additionally, time spent on SNS use reveals a positive relationship with opinion seeking and opinion passing. The conclusion of the present study highlights the eWOM as a cost-effective communication tool for tourism marketing and renders practical and theoretical implications along with suggestions for future research.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-271-9

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Book part
Publication date: 27 December 2018

HyeJin Tina Yeo, Malaika McKee and William Trent

In this chapter, EYES theory proposes that international students view themselves and appraise their social standing of their own race based in relationship to extant…

Abstract

In this chapter, EYES theory proposes that international students view themselves and appraise their social standing of their own race based in relationship to extant social perceptions of racial stereotypes in the United States. These stereotypes are determined by geography which exude from the legacy of enslavement in the United States. EYES theory proposes that international students view racial differences through these dynamics by assessing their own identity in regards to race, colorsim and group identification. Specifically, international students use racial groups to classify, rank, and understand racial differences that are informed by these social geographies that impart a white/black racial discourse by which international students navigate their social status. EYES theory challenges the intellectual perception of heterogeneity among international students and in regards to race posits that international students experience mico and macrolevel contexts regarding race due to the socio-historical legacy of racism in the United States. The authors anticipate that EYES theory may have implications for study in other geographical contexts where a black white dichotomy serves as the parameter for understanding racial relationships and hegemony.

Details

Perspectives on Diverse Student Identities in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Equity and Inclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-053-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Doyeon Won, Weisheng Chiu, Hyejin Bang and Gonzalo A. Bravo

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of perceived organizational support (POS) on the relationships between volunteer job satisfaction, attitude toward…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of perceived organizational support (POS) on the relationships between volunteer job satisfaction, attitude toward volunteering and continuance intention. Also, this study investigated the moderating role of volunteer age in the relationships between study variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were recruited from volunteers in the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and/or the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games (N = 4,824). Data were primarily analyzed using the partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) and multigroup analysis (PLS-MGA).

Findings

Results of the PLS-SEM indicated that, firstly, POS had a positive and significant effect on continuance intention, attitude and job satisfaction. Moreover, the influence of job satisfaction on attitude was statistically significant. Paths from attitude and job satisfaction to continuance intention were statistically and positively significant. As a next step, PLS-MGA was conducted using basic bootstrapping to test the age difference in the research model. Significant differences were found in the paths from POS to attitude and from satisfaction to continuance intention. More specifically, the influence of POS on attitude was significantly stronger for the younger group. On the other hand, the impact of satisfaction on continuance intention was significantly stronger for the older group.

Originality/value

The large sample size of this study offered more persuasive empirical evidence on the role of POS in volunteers' perception and behavior. The findings suggest the importance of the event organizer's support for volunteer outcomes and clear communication with volunteers on their needs and wants.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Hyejin Bang, Stephen Ross and Thomas G. Reio

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of job satisfaction in the relationship between volunteers’ motivation and affective commitment in non‐profit…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of job satisfaction in the relationship between volunteers’ motivation and affective commitment in non‐profit sport organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A mail survey was conducted with a sample of 214 individuals who volunteered at 22 non‐profit sport organizations in a Midwestern state of the USA.

Findings

Results from structural equation modeling analysis supported the partial mediation role of job satisfaction. The values factor of volunteers’ motivation had a significant direct impact on affective commitment, and job satisfaction partially mediated the relationship between values and affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Although volunteer motivation influences the level of organizational commitment, volunteers who are motivated by their values would be more satisfied with their volunteer experience and consequently be more committed to the non‐profit sport organization.

Originality/value

Little research has specifically addressed volunteer commitment and its links to volunteer motivation and job satisfaction in the context of non‐profit sport organizations. Therefore, the study contributes to the understanding of volunteers’ motivation and how it influences commitment toward non‐profit sport organizations.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Hyejin Bang, Michael A. Odio and Thomas Reio

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the influences of theory of planned behavior (TPB) constructs (i.e. attitude, subjective norm, and perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the influences of theory of planned behavior (TPB) constructs (i.e. attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control (PBC)) on individuals’ volunteer intention for future sporting events, and second, to investigate the moderating effects of brand reputation and moral obligation in the relationships between TPB constructs and volunteer intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 107 volunteers at the 2009 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament. Moderated hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to test the hypothesized relationships of the model.

Findings

Subjective norm and PBC were significantly associated with volunteer intention. Brand reputation was found to be a moderator in the relationships between attitude and volunteer intention and between subjective norm and volunteer intention, and moral obligation moderated the relationship between PBC and volunteer intention.

Practical implications

Sporting events/volunteer managers must understand individuals’ decision-making process with respect to volunteering at sporting events and important insights into new strategies to increase volunteer recruitment, retention, and reliability.

Social implications

Because sporting event managers face considerable obstacles in recruiting and retaining a volunteer workforce, an enhanced understanding of volunteering may highlight new ways to remove obstacles to being a volunteer to the benefit of individuals and society.

Originality/value

This paper emphasizes the importance of brand reputation and moral obligation as moderators of the effects of the TPB constructs on volunteer intention in the context of sporting events.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Hyejin Bang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating role of Age in the relationships between leader-member exchange dimensions (Affect, Loyalty, Contribution, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating role of Age in the relationships between leader-member exchange dimensions (Affect, Loyalty, Contribution, and Professional Respect) and Job Satisfaction and between Job Satisfaction and Intention to Stay among volunteers in nonprofit sport organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of moderated hierarchical multiple regression analyses was conducted using the survey responses of 214 volunteers in 22 nonprofit sport organizations.

Findings

The results indicated that Age moderated the relationship between Professional Respect and Job Satisfaction such that it was stronger for younger volunteers, and Job Satisfaction had a greater positive influence on Intention to Stay for older rather than younger volunteers.

Originality/value

These findings provide valuable insights into how age may be an important factor influencing volunteers’ job satisfaction and intention to continue to volunteer. Implications for practitioners and future research are also discussed.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Jens Blumrodt, Douglas Bryson and John Flanagan

Brand management is a central issue for the sports industry in general, and professional football clubs (usually called soccer teams in the USA) are the archetypal branded…

Abstract

Purpose

Brand management is a central issue for the sports industry in general, and professional football clubs (usually called soccer teams in the USA) are the archetypal branded sport in that industry; the brand is their most important asset. Match attendance equates with financial return; patently it is a preoccupation of senior management. Metrics of brand performance need be up to date, and include contemporary issues such as corporate social responsibility (CSR) as a reflection of consumer expectations. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology aims to evaluate consumers' perceptions and purchase behaviours. A sample survey of consumers' brand evaluations has been collected and factor and regression analyses have been employed.

Findings

Recent models based on Keller's conceptual approach have not emphasized the evolution of societal concerns. Brand management in the football industry has to change to meet customer expectations better.

Practical implications

This research demonstrates that professional football clubs may be different from other businesses. The research method used enables the evaluation of customer‐based brand equity. Findings suggest clubs' involvement in community activities influences brand image and customer behaviour. The sport entertainment industry requires a specific type of brand management and customer perceived ethicality has to be an integral part of the approach.

Originality/value

Brand theories tend to stem from marketing and they are inclined to emphasize the same kind of product‐oriented concerns. However, customers expect more than watching an exciting game in a pleasant environment; they are affected by clubs' community involvement which impacts on the affect towards the brand. This is demonstrated through purchase behaviours of spectators. This research determines and evaluates these issues for the cases of two professional football clubs.

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