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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Hwee Ling Lim

The United Arab Emirates' demographics show the entry of a large Generation Y (Gen Y) segment into the workforce. Companies need talented human resources hence this trend…

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Abstract

Purpose

The United Arab Emirates' demographics show the entry of a large Generation Y (Gen Y) segment into the workforce. Companies need talented human resources hence this trend has implications for the country's continued economic growth. However, little is known about Gen Y in the UAE. Furthermore, the asymmetric distributions of the population and labor force by nationality, positively skewed for expatriates, present a diverse population that challenges our understanding of this generation. The purpose of this paper is to examine the life priorities and work preferences of Gen Y Emiratis and expatriates, so that organizations can effectively recruit this new generation into the nation's workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey and interview results from Schwartz Value Inventory and Twenge et al.'s motivational model were analyzed for correspondence between life priority and work preference choices, and differences in preferences of Emiratis and expatriates.

Findings

Emirati and expatriate Gen Y regarded seeking stability as the most important life priority and were most motivated by extrinsic rewards. However, differences were found in the ranking of other life values and in comparison with the literature.

Originality/value

This research extended previous studies and increases understanding of Gen Y at work. Moreover, recommendations for the effective recruitment and retention are provided to help organizations manage this young generation who are central to the future of the Middle East.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

ENG HWEE LIM and FLORENCE YEAN YNG LING

Clients' financial status, characteristics, management competency and construction experience can have significant effects upon the attainment of project success. A survey…

Abstract

Clients' financial status, characteristics, management competency and construction experience can have significant effects upon the attainment of project success. A survey was conducted to gauge whether consultants and contractors felt that 20 client related attributes uncovered from the literature have influence on the project outcome. Data were collected via a mailed questionnaire. Results show that all the 20 client related attributes are important and contribute to project success. A multiple linear regression model was constructed to predict a client's contribution to project success. Five predictive attributes were identified: ‘client sets down project objectives clearly’, ‘client is credit worthy’, ‘client does not contribute to project complexity’, ‘client is not litigious’, and ‘client trusts project team members’. This model provides consultants and contractors with a tool to evaluate their clients. It is recommended that clients focus on the more important attributes identified in this study, to ensure project success.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 9 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Florence Ling and Hwee Loon Lim

The aim of this research is to investigate how foreign firms manage financial and economic risks when operating in China's construction industry. The specific purposes of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to investigate how foreign firms manage financial and economic risks when operating in China's construction industry. The specific purposes of the paper are to: identify the types of financial and economic risks foreign firms face and the frequency and severity of these risks; examine how foreign firms manage these risks; and recommend a risk management framework that can be adopted by foreign firms to mitigate financial and economic risks in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The data collection instrument was a questionnaire which had open‐ended questions. The data collection method was face‐to‐face in‐depth interviews with 22 experts from Singapore who have experience in China's construction industry.

Findings

Nine economic and financial risks affecting foreign firms that operate in China's construction industry are found. Of these, the risks that occur frequently and are severe are: labour and material price fluctuation; and contractors/subcontractors' default. Eighteen contractual and general measures were found to be useful in mitigating these risks.

Research limitations/implications

The findings may not be readily generalized because interviews were conducted with 22 China experts, all of whom are from Singapore.

Practical implications

Foreign firms could use the findings to help them decide on the most appropriate measures to adopt, to overcome financial and economic risks that they face when operating in China's construction industry.

Originality/value

The research proposed a framework for foreign firms to use in managing financial and economic risks in China. It recommends different measures to mitigate different types of risks.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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