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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Andy Neely, John Mills, Ken Platts, Mike Gregory and Huw Richards

It is widely accepted that firms should have manufacturing strategiesconsistent with their overall business strategies, but while much hasbeen written about the content of…

Abstract

It is widely accepted that firms should have manufacturing strategies consistent with their overall business strategies, but while much has been written about the content of these strategies, little has been said about how they should be developed and realized. Reports on research which set out to investigate the extent to which UK firms seek to influence the realization of their manufacturing strategies through their performance measurement systems. Over 800 small and medium‐sized manufacturing enterprises (SMEs) in the UK were surveyed in late 1992. Analysis of the data suggests that while firms which compete on quality or time place most emphasis on performance measures which match their strategies, those which compete on price do not.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

John Mills, Andy Neely, Ken Platts, Huw Richards and Mike Gregory

This paper describes a longitudinal picture of manufacturing strategy called a strategy chart. It begins with a summary of the research methodology used to develop and…

Abstract

This paper describes a longitudinal picture of manufacturing strategy called a strategy chart. It begins with a summary of the research methodology used to develop and test the picture in live situations. Next, the chart and its role within an overall manufacturing strategy process are described. Case examples are then used to illustrate practical outcomes of a longitudinal viewpoint in two areas; first, to increase the awareness of a firm′s strategy making process and, second, to make strategies more explicit than previous methods. The method produces a rich picture that appears useful for reviewing the coherence between manufacturing and business strategy; showing strategy as concrete actions as well as objectives and plans; for providing insight into the firm′s realised strategy and its strategy process; and as a strategy communication tool which may make strategies more credible.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Andy Neely, John Mills, Ken Platts, Huw Richards, Mike Gregory, Mike Bourne and Mike Kennerley

Describes the development and testing of a structured methodology for the design of performance measurement systems. Frameworks, such as the balanced scorecard and the…

Abstract

Describes the development and testing of a structured methodology for the design of performance measurement systems. Frameworks, such as the balanced scorecard and the performance prism, have been proposed, but until recently little attention has been devoted to the question of how these frameworks can be populated, i.e. how managers can decide specifically which measures to adopt. Following a wide ranging review of the performance measurement literature, a framework identifying the desirable characteristics of a performance measurement system design process is developed. This framework provided guidelines which were subsequently used to inform the development of a process‐based approach to performance measurement system design. The process was enhanced and refined during application in three action research projects, involving major UK automotive and aerospace companies. The revised process was then formally documented and tested through six further industrial applications. Finally the process was written up in the form of a workbook and made publicly available.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 20 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

Andy Neely, Huw Richards, John Mills, Ken Platts and Mike Bourne

Describes the development and testing of a framework which can assist in the process of designing performance measures. Grounds the framework in the relevant literature…

Abstract

Describes the development and testing of a framework which can assist in the process of designing performance measures. Grounds the framework in the relevant literature and explains how it was developed and tested through a series of action research projects involving collaborators primarily from the aerospace and automotive industries. Notes that inadequately designed performance measures can result in dysfunctional behaviour often due to the method of calculation encouraging individuals to pursue inappropriate courses of action. The performance measure record sheet presented provides a structure which considers factors such as the purpose of the measure and the source of data. Notes the advantages of the record sheet, such as its use to audit existing measures of performance and to facilitate the process of designing new ones.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

David Blake

As a new framework for quality assurance in teacher education emerges,internal and external constituencies with an interest in teachereducation quality are making…

Abstract

As a new framework for quality assurance in teacher education emerges, internal and external constituencies with an interest in teacher education quality are making burdensome demands on the sector. The constituencies include OFSTED, Government agencies concerned with accreditation and funding, the HE institutions, the teaching profession and student teachers. The result is a series of potentially conflicting pressures and a heavy cycle of inspection and report writing. There is a danger that tutors involved in the process will become sceptical about it, falling back on compliant responses in order to satisfy demands at a surface level. Examines quality assurance in teacher education, reports the way in which one group of teacher education tutors conceptualizes the idea of quality in practice and identifies those characteristics of a quality assurance system which should retain the confidence of staff.

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Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Richard Kwiatkowski

In this unashamedly polemical piece it is argued that we should not jump into bed with virtue too quickly. It is suggested that the concept of virtue is dangerously ill…

Abstract

In this unashamedly polemical piece it is argued that we should not jump into bed with virtue too quickly. It is suggested that the concept of virtue is dangerously ill defined, so it becomes what those in power hegemonically define it to be; that virtue’s rise may serve factional political purposes within social science; that system implications are frequently missed, side-lined or minimised so that virtue niavely becomes a purely individual construct; that aspirational codes, which expect a-contextual demonstration of ‘virtue’ from practitioners, need to be tempered with a dose of reality; and that the achievable ‘good enough’ is better than the unrealisable and idealised virtuously ‘perfect’. It is suggested that the implied centrality of ‘virtue’ in research is problematic, that being ‘critically virtuous’ has limits, and that better education will not necessarily lead to morality and integrity in research – any more than it does in the general population. Finally it is argued that ethics committees should focus on (probable) behaviours, rather than rather than imagined motives or vague character traits. Locating virtue in an individual is dangerous because it allows the system to blame and punish an individual, rather than acknowledge the collective responsibility of the whole system. It is suggested that we need to move from a purist pursuit of virtue to a more realistic and nuanced appreciation of the real world consequences of its adoption. Whilst the present emphasis on sound research ethics and responsibility is a positive development, we need to slow down.

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Virtue Ethics in the Conduct and Governance of Social Science Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-608-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

K. Narasimhan

Abstract

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Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Can-Seng Ooi

This chapter is based on more than a decade of art world research in Singapore but offers a single case of a composer who has composed a work for an orchestra. This study…

Abstract

This chapter is based on more than a decade of art world research in Singapore but offers a single case of a composer who has composed a work for an orchestra. This study presents the creative reputation dilemma faced by many artists who attempt to be more entrepreneurial. Most countries promote their creative economy, and that has generated a class of artist entrepreneurs or ‘artrepreneurs’. Professional artists are encouraged and challenged to be economically independent and also to make their practice more profitable. For many artrepreneurs, maintaining their creative reputation comes with emotional costs. The thick description in this chapter demonstrates how an artist negotiates with the patron in finalising a new piece of commissioned music. But they failed to close the deal. This case deviates from studies that focus on successes in the creative industries. Creativity entails experimentation and creating new things, but new things may not be well-received. Nonetheless, these ‘unsuccessful’ works are part of the art world and contribute to creating cultural value in society.

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Exploring Cultural Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-515-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

K. Narasimhan

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Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2010

Andrea MacLeod

This paper reports on the pilot phase of a participatory project to develop an online ‘AS portal’, which provided peer‐to‐peer support for higher education students with…

Abstract

This paper reports on the pilot phase of a participatory project to develop an online ‘AS portal’, which provided peer‐to‐peer support for higher education students with Asperger's syndrome. The process of development is described and the initial outcomes of the pilot evaluated, including qualitative feedback from participants. Participants actively engaged with the portal, by giving and receiving support through in‐depth discussion, much of which centred on the experience of having autism. The research indicates that there is value in further exploring peer support networks for individuals on the autism spectrum and highlights the importance of appropriate design and sufficient time‐scale for such initiatives. It also reflects on the implications of participatory methodologies for both researchers and participants.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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