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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Samantha Kibblewhite, Sue Bowker and Huw R. Jenkins

A healthy, balanced and nutritious diet for children and young people is essential for normal growth and development. Vending machines can be a source of food and drink…

Abstract

Purpose

A healthy, balanced and nutritious diet for children and young people is essential for normal growth and development. Vending machines can be a source of food and drink high in fat, sugar and salt, and can undermine healthy eating messages. The purpose of this paper is to examine the contents of vending machines available in the vicinity of paediatric wards and paediatric out‐patient departments in hospitals in Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires are completed by staff in the Department of Child Health in each NHS Trust in Wales. This paper summarises the results.

Findings

Most vending machines found in the vicinity of paediatric wards and paediatric out‐patient departments in hospitals in Wales contain a majority of foods high in fat salt and sugar. Only a few contain over 50 per cent of drinks classified as healthy.

Research limitations/implications

There is no universally agreed definition of healthy food as related to individual products. This study looks at the availability of foods and drinks classified as “unhealthy” but does not look at the overall diet of the children in the ward.

Practical implications

The results of this study should encourage NHS Trusts to consider the contents of vending machines in the vicinity of paediatric wards and paediatric out‐patient departments in hospitals.

Originality/value

There is much rhetoric around the potential of vending machines to contribute to an unhealthy diet. This is the first paper to identify specific problems with hospital vending machines.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Jen Schradie

Despite the pendulum swing from utopian to dystopian views of the Internet, the direction of the popular and academic literature continues to lean toward its liberatory…

Abstract

Despite the pendulum swing from utopian to dystopian views of the Internet, the direction of the popular and academic literature continues to lean toward its liberatory potential, particularly as a tool for redressing social inequality. At the same time, decades of digital inequality scholarship have shown persistent socioeconomic inequality in Internet access and use. Yet most of this research captures class by individualized income and education variables, rather than a power relational framework. By tracing research on how fear, control, and risk manifest itself with inequalities related to digital content, digital activism, and digital work, I argue that a narrow stratification approach may miss the full cause and effect of digital inequality. Instead, a class analysis based on power relations may contribute to a broader and more precise theoretical lens to understand the digital divide. As a result, technology can reinforce, or even exacerbate, existing patterns of social and economic inequality because of this power differential.

Details

Rethinking Class and Social Difference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-020-5

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Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Cristiano Codagnone, Athina Karatzogianni and Jacob Matthews

Abstract

Details

Platform Economics: Rhetoric and Reality in the ‘Sharing Economy’
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-809-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Lloyd C. Harris and Huw Jenkins

Aims to: supply an exploration and description of the extent to which strategic marketing planning is being undertaken by UK rugby union clubs; and identify, explore and…

Abstract

Aims to: supply an exploration and description of the extent to which strategic marketing planning is being undertaken by UK rugby union clubs; and identify, explore and outline the main intra and extra‐organizational barriers and impediments to the development of planning within rugby clubs. Begins with an overview of relevant literature. First, existing views on the content, processes and obstacles to strategic marketing planning are reviewed. Second, the topics of sports management, organization and sports marketing planning are introduced and discussed. After the presentation of the research design and methodology employed, the findings of an exploratory study into the extent and the barriers to strategic marketing planning within UK rugby union clubs are presented. Finishes with a discussion of conclusions and implications for both theorists and practitioners.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

“Consumerism”, for want of a better description, is given to the mass of statutory control (which shows no sign of declining) of standards, trading justice to the…

Abstract

“Consumerism”, for want of a better description, is given to the mass of statutory control (which shows no sign of declining) of standards, trading justice to the consumer, means of redress to those who have been misled and defrauded, advice to those in doubt; and to the widespread movement, mostly in the Western world, to achieve these ends.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 86 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1980

Some months ago a national organisation established to keep a watchful eye on the Nation's diet expressed concern over the eating trends of people in what to them appeared…

Abstract

Some months ago a national organisation established to keep a watchful eye on the Nation's diet expressed concern over the eating trends of people in what to them appeared to be developing inbalances of necessary nutrient factors and the inadeuacy not so much of calories and energy values but in the nature and quality of main food factors. It was recommended that the national diet should be improved, but the authorities pointed to the National Food Survey results to show that the diet was not deficient; that the average daily intake of protein, vitamins, minerals and overall energy requirements were satisfied; all of which is true for the not‐too‐generous levels set. Even the pensioner households included in the Survey sample appear well‐fed. What causes concern is the year‐by‐year decrease in staple foods consumed—milk, red meat, bread, fresh vegetables—and the heavy reliance on refined, processed foods. In its annual reports on NFS reviews, the BFJ has almost monotonously referred to this downward trend. Individual NFS Reports do not reveal any serious deficiencies, as yet, but in the trend over the years—and herein lies the real value of the Survey and its data—few if any of the changes have been for the better; movements in food groups have tended to be downwards. If these trends continue, the time must surely come when there will be real deficiencies; that substitution within a food group cannot make good essential foods severely rationed by high prices.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 82 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Rhodri Thomas and Huw Thomas

This paper aims to examine the extent to which micro businesses in tourism might influence the process of tourism policy formation and change in urban settings.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the extent to which micro businesses in tourism might influence the process of tourism policy formation and change in urban settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework that considers the motivations to participate in the policy‐making process and the resources needed to influence policy change informs a case study of micro businesses in Saltaire, UK.

Findings

The paper argues that, although the propensity of local micro firms to influence the local political agenda will be affected by structural considerations that manifest themselves differently from place to place, it is possible to identify key conditions that will need to be present if such enterprises are to challenge the power of other local interests.

Originality/value

The paper begins to redress the imbalance in the literature that has neglected micro business participation in policy formation and change.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

In a full blaze of comings and goings, it is unnecessary to remind ourselves that the holiday season is upon us; mass travel to faraway places. The media have for months…

Abstract

In a full blaze of comings and goings, it is unnecessary to remind ourselves that the holiday season is upon us; mass travel to faraway places. The media have for months, all through the winter, been extolling a surfeit of romantic areas of the world, exspecially on television; of colourful scenes, exotic beauties, brilliant sunshine everywhere; travel mostly by air as so‐called package tours — holidays for the masses! The most popular areas are countries of the Mediterranean littoral, from Israel to Spain, North Africa, the Adriatic, but of recent years, much farhter afield, India, South‐east Asia and increasingly to the USA.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 83 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Simon Down

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to argue that the production of past workplace and organizational ethnographies needs to be better understood in their historical…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to argue that the production of past workplace and organizational ethnographies needs to be better understood in their historical context. Design/methodology/approach – A programme of research work on the history of workplace and organizational ethnography is proposed, and a historiographical discussion outlines the purpose, scope and means by which such a project might be realised. Findings – The article highlights why organizational ethnographers should understand the history of their research practice. Originality/value – The paper suggests that a serious attempt is made to create a body of historical knowledge about workplace and organizational ethnography. The value of this would be to deepen the contribution ethnographic research makes to organization and management studies, and ensure that continuity and change in ethnographic research practices are better understood.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

H.G.A. Hughes

Abstract

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Reference Reviews, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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