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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Nancy Higginson, Cynthia Simmons and Hussein Warsame

Findings from earlier legitimacy based accounting studies provide evidence that firms respond to threats to their perceived legitimacy by increasing communication to the…

Abstract

Findings from earlier legitimacy based accounting studies provide evidence that firms respond to threats to their perceived legitimacy by increasing communication to the public. This communication is meant to demonstrate that their actions are commensurate with the values and norms of relevant stakeholder groups. Questions remain, however, as to whether it is merely a form of impression management or a reflection of the congruent activities of the firm. In the late 1990s, a unique situation arose in British Columbia’s coastal forestry industry that enabled us to examine this issue. For many years, this industry had been the target of environmental non‐government organisations’ (ENGOs) campaigns to influence change in forest management practices and conserve the coastal rainforests. In late 1999, a subset of the industry responded by forming a coalition with key ENGOs. The aim of the coalition was to develop a consensus package of recommendations for the Government of B. C. founded on eco‐system based forest management practices. Facing threats to their critical export markets, the firms viewed this initiative as their best chance for long‐term survival. We found that during this period of time there was an increase in the amount of environmental disclosure in coalition firm annual reports as compared to pre‐ and post‐coalition periods, as well as to that in a matched set of non‐coalition B.C. forestry firms. This finding provides evidence of the use of annual reports for social disclosure beyond their use as a vehicle for impression management.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Hussein Ahmed Warsame

The main argument of this paper is that the accounting profession in Canada exercises hegemonic leadership over the development of tax education in terms of cadence and…

Abstract

The main argument of this paper is that the accounting profession in Canada exercises hegemonic leadership over the development of tax education in terms of cadence and direction of reforms. To support this argument, the paper uses the development of the microeconomic approach to teaching taxation and the correlation between the numbers of tax courses taught in undergraduate programs and exemptions provided by the provincial institutes of the Canadian Chartered Accountants to students joining them. It uses arguments from institutional isomorphism to elucidate expected resistance to adopting new developments, such as the microeconomic approach, in the accounting field. The paper also builds on Gramsci’s theory of hegemony to imply that business schools have given their consent to the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants by closely linking their curriculum, at least the taxation courses, to that of the institute.

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Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Oliver N. Okafor, Mark Anderson and Hussein Warsame

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether financial information prepared and disclosed under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) has incremental…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether financial information prepared and disclosed under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) has incremental value relevance vs information prepared under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) in Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ a difference in differences methodology and estimate value relevance using: first, the adjusted R2 of regressions of stock price on book value and earnings; second, the adjusted R2 of regressions of stock returns on earnings and changes in earnings; and third, a time series incremental association return estimation. The authors use multiple models including a model similar to the Ohlson (1995) model and a modified Balachandran and Mohanram (2011) model to investigate value relevance in the period 2008-2013.

Findings

The authors provide empirical evidence, based on unique Canadian environment, that accounting information prepared and disclosed under IFRS exhibits higher price and returns value relevance than accounting information prepared previously under local GAAP. Sensitivity analyses and yearly trends regressions produce collaborating evidence.

Originality/value

The study provides early empirical evidence that value relevance increases in mandatory IFRS adoption, based on unique Canadian adoption. The Canadian adoption is unique because Canada: first, is the first G7 non-European country to adopt IFRS; second, had pursued a dual strategy of harmonizing with the US GAAP while supporting IFRS convergence; third, provided information environment that mitigates the problems associated with measuring the effects of IFRS adoption in the European countries where IFRS or its predecessor – international accounting standards – had permeated the reporting environment prior to the mandatory adoption in 2005; and fourth, allowed firms listed on the US exchanges to continue to use or adopt the US GAAP for financial reporting and thus, provided a group of benchmark firms drawn from the same social-political and economic environment as the treatment firms. The study clarifies prior inconsistent results from European samples.

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International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Jamal A. Nazari, Irene M. Herremans and Hussein A. Warsame

The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of internal variables, such as strategic governance and operational controls, along with external variables that…

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4190

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of internal variables, such as strategic governance and operational controls, along with external variables that influence sustainability reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on the corporate governance and sustainability reporting literature, the authors develop a model to integrate external motivators and internal facilitators to determine their impact on sustainability reporting. The authors also control for a number of financial and non-financial variables that may influence sustainability reporting. The authors limit their sample to the companies in extractive industries that report their greenhouse gas emission to the Government of Canada. The authors collected the data from several data sources including secondary archival databases, newspapers, Web sites and annual reports.

Findings

Using a sample of companies in high-polluting industries, the authors found that variables representing both external pressures that act as motivators and internal controls that act as facilitators are significantly associated with enhanced sustainability reporting.

Practical implications

Considering the formation of several international initiatives such as International Integrated Reporting Council to improve sustainability reporting for decision-making, the authors’ research provides interesting insights both to policymakers and managers about organizational characteristics that are important to make reporting useful and relevant.

Originality/value

Little academic research has investigated the role of internal variables in facilitating sustainability reporting. The authors use a robust model that combines external and internal variables to more thoroughly understand the reporting process.

Details

Corporate Governance, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Tao Zeng

In this paper, I provide an empirical work in order to test the tax‐adjusted market valuation (residual income) model. Feltham‐Ohlson's (1995) residual income model can be…

Abstract

In this paper, I provide an empirical work in order to test the tax‐adjusted market valuation (residual income) model. Feltham‐Ohlson's (1995) residual income model can be extended by adding corporate tax: firm market value is a function of the bottom line after‐tax accounting data, e.g., book value and after‐tax earnings. Under this tax‐adjusted framework, certain issues are examined: the information from the firm's operating activities is not enough to measure the firm's market value; financial activities also affect firm market value. In particular, abnormal financial earnings are not equal to zero, due to the tax deduction on interest expenses. An empirical analysis, using the financial reporting data of Canadian firms for the years 1994–1999, demonstrates that the current book value of financial assets and operating assets, abnormal operating earnings, and abnormal financial earnings are all relevant to firm market value. The sensitivity tests, which define the corporate tax rates in different ways, do not change the results. The sensitivity test, which uses the financial analysts' forecasts, does not change the results, either. Furthermore, the empirical analysis shows that abnormal financial earnings enhance firm share price more when the firm has lower non‐tax costs, i.e., firm business risk (financial distress) and bankruptcy costs. It supports the previous research on capital structure to the extent that debt financing benefits a firm more when non‐tax costs are lower.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2009

Charles H. Cho and Dennis M. Patten

This investigation/report/reflection was motivated largely by the occasion of the first Centre for Social and Environmental Accounting Research (CSEAR) “Summer School” in…

Abstract

This investigation/report/reflection was motivated largely by the occasion of the first Centre for Social and Environmental Accounting Research (CSEAR) “Summer School” in North America.1 But its roots reach down as well to other recent reflection/investigation pieces, in particular, Mathews (1997), Gray (2002, 2006), and Deegan and Soltys (2007). The last of these authors note (p. 82) that CSEAR Summer Schools were initiated in Australasia, at least partly as a means to spur interest and activity in social and environmental accounting (SEA) research. So, too, was the first North American CSEAR Summer School.2 We believe, therefore, that it is worthwhile to attempt in some way to identify where SEA currently stands as a field of interest within the broader academic accounting domain in Canada and the United States.3 As well, however, we believe this is a meaningful time for integrating our views on the future of our chosen academic sub-discipline with those of Gray (2002), Deegan and Soltys (2007), and others. Thus, as the title suggests, we seek to identify (1) who the SEA researchers in North America are; (2) the degree to which North American–based accounting research journals publish SEA-related research; and (3) where we, the SEA sub-discipline within North America, might be headed. We begin with the who.

Details

Sustainability, Environmental Performance and Disclosures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-765-3

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Mohammed Hersi Warsame and Edward Mugambi Ireri

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect moderation effects of demographic and socio-economic(s) factors on the adoption of Islamic banking in UAE.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect moderation effects of demographic and socio-economic(s) factors on the adoption of Islamic banking in UAE.

Design/methodology/approach

Convenience sampling was done on the residents of Sharjah, Dubai, and Abu Dhabi. A closed-ended questionnaire with 30 items was designed and pre-tested before the start of the study. Path analysis and moderation testing were the main analytical approach. A total of 320 respondents completed the survey.

Findings

The research revealed that demographic and socio-economic(s) moderators may have direct and indirect moderation effects on the adoption of the Islamic banking in the UAE, which indicates the importance of these factors in the provision of Islamic banking products and services in the UAE.

Practical implications

This study further revealed that these moderators have huge practical implications for Islamic bank managers and marketers as they can exploit these demographics to enhance their market share in the UAE.

Social implications

In UAE, minimal attention has been directed toward the role moderators would play in the criterion that individual investors would use in the adoption of Islamic banking products and services in a cosmopolitan environment that is experiencing competition from conventional banks.

Originality/value

An extensive review of the existing literature on the adoption of Islamic banking reveals that no empirical research has been undertaken to explore the role played by demographic and socio-economic(s) moderators in the adoption of Islamic banking in UAE and internationally. This study attempts to fill this gap.

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 7 June 2021

The deal opens a consensual path to elections after the parties agreed on steps to address disputes that have delayed polls since last December.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB261922

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Executive summary
Publication date: 8 June 2021

SOMALIA: Election deal faces first bump in the road

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES261977

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2019

Andi Duqi and Hussein Al-Tamimi

The purpose of this study is to examine the perception of UAE investors regarding their investment preference of Sukuk versus conventional bonds.

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1563

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the perception of UAE investors regarding their investment preference of Sukuk versus conventional bonds.

Design/methodology/approach

A modified questionnaire was used in this study with the objective of answering the research questions and testing the developed hypothesis. The survey was conducted on a sample of investors of the UAE Dubai Financial Market, which is one of the main exchanges where Sukuk are traded.

Findings

The results indicate that Sukuk features (characteristics) represent the most important influencing factor in the willingness of UAE investors to invest in Islamic Sukuk, followed by the religious factor, as strongly predicted, followed by the expected return and followed by the availability of information. Finally, the results indicate that there is no significant difference in investment in Sukuk among UAE investors based on investors’ gender.

Originality/value

The current study is considered the first of its kind conducted on the UAE. As far as the authors know, there are no studies that focus specifically on social and economic factors that affect the propensity of investors to trade in Sukuk.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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