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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Zamzami Zainuddin, Hussein Haruna, Xiuhan Li, Yin Zhang and Samuel Kai Wah Chu

Despite the enhanced popularity of flipped classroom research, there is a lack of empirical evidence reported about the different impacts revealed by the implementation of…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the enhanced popularity of flipped classroom research, there is a lack of empirical evidence reported about the different impacts revealed by the implementation of this concept. Therefore, to respond to this issue, this study aims to review and analyze the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 48 studies recently published in 2017 and 2018. The analysis was based on flipped classroom impacts from various fields.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review and content analysis were used as a methodology to investigate positive impacts and challenges of flipped classroom implementation.

Findings

The results of the analysis were interpreted using descriptive analysis. Analysis of the impact revealed that the flipped classroom yielded positive impacts on students’ learning activities such as academic performance, learning motivation and/or engagement, social interaction and self-directed learning skills. Meanwhile, the most significant challenges encountered by the instructors is a lack of students’ motivation to watch the pre-recorded video lectures or to study the contents outside of the class time.

Practical implications

Several issues in this discussion become implications that can be taken into consideration for future research. The findings suggest that the flipped classroom concept might be effective in promoting the twenty-first century learning skills.

Originality/value

While highlighting the limitations of an ineffective flipped classroom implementation, this study proposes further recommendations for future research.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Hussein Haruna, Zamzami Zainuddin, Robin R. Mellecker, Samuel K.W. Chu and Xiao Hu

Digital technology has great potential for educating today’s digitally oriented adolescents on health. In particular, digital health gamified learning can make the…

Abstract

Purpose

Digital technology has great potential for educating today’s digitally oriented adolescents on health. In particular, digital health gamified learning can make the promotion of the sexual well-being of adolescents more effective. Although venereal diseases such as HIV/AIDS have become a greater problem in Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries than in any country outside of Africa, little is publicly known about the development of gamified learning for use in counter-measures. This paper aims to address that deficit by presenting the process of developing one such game. The paper highlights how the “My Future Begins Today” game for sexual health education was developed, evaluated and refined in the real-world of low-tech settings and made improvements based on the response of users.

Design/methodology/approach

Design-based research (DBR) was used to guide the design, develop, test and refine the digital game in iterative cycles. The evaluation of the effectiveness of iterations of the game was done using adolescent sexual health literacy tests and the validated Motivation, Attitude, Knowledge and Engagement framework, the authors developed based on existing approaches. That framework combines the elements of motivation, attitude, knowledge and engagement, effectiveness was evaluated based on the game’s ability to motivate students, improve their attitudes, increase their acquisition of knowledge and engage them in learning self-rating surveys and interviews. The whole process of game design, testing, evaluation and refinement were underpinned by the activity theory, DBR and participatory design (PD) research.

Findings

Participants in the gamified learning platforms demonstrated higher average scores on their post-tests than their counterparts subjected to the traditional teaching classroom. Also, gamified learning groups commented positively on the effectiveness of their instructional approach than their counterparts in the traditional learning group. The stakeholders’ involvement in developing gamified learning provided a good understanding of the importance of the game to the adolescent students and how it was going to be used to address the problem identified. The application of PD contributed to the effectiveness of the game. It involved various actors from various fields who were relevant to the game. Also, engaging targeted users from the beginning resulted in the creation of a better correspondence with the preferences of end-users.

Practical implications

This study has contributed to a better understanding of sex education and knowledge in the area of adolescent reproductive health issues, using developed innovative game mechanics features and its applicability in low-tech settings.

Originality/value

The study will be a recommendation for future researchers in applying this gamified learning concept and its suitability in their teaching practice, particularly regarding sexual health education and adolescent reproductive health issues in low-tech settings of SSA.

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Hussein Haruna, Asad Abbas, Zamzami Zainuddin, Xiao Hu, Robin R. Mellecker and Samira Hosseini

This paper aims to evaluate the students’ perception of their learning experiences concerning serious gaming and gamification instructions and determines whether they were…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the students’ perception of their learning experiences concerning serious gaming and gamification instructions and determines whether they were motivated enough and engaged during the educative process in a resource-poor context. Moreover, the study evaluated the impact of interactive instructional environment outcomes in terms of students’ perceptions of the learning catalysed by gamified systems, particularly in enhancing attitude change coupled with knowledge acquisition.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a qualitative research design technique to collect the data. A total of 108 first year secondary school students participated in a sexual health literacy course that lasted for a five-week learning period. Using a cluster-sampling technique, three classes were randomly assigned to serious gaming, gamification and teacher-centred instructions. Individual face-to-face interviews were used to assess students’ perceives required satisfaction with three instructions. Data were audio-recorded, and coding analysis was used using NVivo software facilitated qualitative data analysis.

Findings

The results show that serious gaming and gamification instructions trumped the traditional teacher-centred instruction method. While intervention students were all positive about the serious gaming and gamification instructions, non-intervention students were negative about conservative teacher-centered learning whose limited interactivity also undermined learning relative to the two innovative interventions.

Research limitations/implications

As a justification to limit face-to-face classes, this study may be useful during an emergency phenomenon, including the current situation of amid COVID-19. The implementation of serious gaming and gamification as remotely instructional options could be among the measures to protect educational communities through reducing close-proximity, and eventually, control contamination and the spread of viruses.

Originality/value

The application of serious gaming and game elements should not be conceptualised as universal but context-specific. This study shows that particularism is essential to optimise the results in terms of coming up with a specific design based on the scope of evaluation for positive results and develop an intervention that will work, especially in the resource-poor context of the developing world.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 12 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Zamzami Zainuddin, Muhammad Shujahat, Samuel K.W. Chu, Hussein Haruna and Ratna Farida

This study aims to assess students’ learning performance and perceived need satisfaction between a gamified flipped classroom (GFC) and flipped classroom (FC) instruction…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess students’ learning performance and perceived need satisfaction between a gamified flipped classroom (GFC) and flipped classroom (FC) instruction in a low-tech setting. The iSpring Learn learning management system was used as a low-tech gamification application in gamifying the flipped learning class.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research approach was used for collecting the data. Three formative assessments were used to examine students’ learning performance during the intervention period, and a post-questionnaire survey was used to support the data collection process with regard to students’ perceived needs satisfaction. In total, 56 students were involved in a non-randomised experiment with a control group design.

Findings

The results reveal that Assessment 1 showed no significant difference between the two intervention groups (p > 0.05), while Assessments 2 and 3 were significantly different (p < 0.05). The survey results confirm that participants in the GFC have achieved a great level of motivation because their innate psychological needs for competence, autonomy and relatedness are satisfied.

Practical implications

The use of game-like features can be a powerful means to produce more engaging and fun activities in the FC context. The study has confirmed that integrating the gamification concept into FC instruction by adding challenges, incentives, points and rewards to quiz questions promoted a more engaging and enjoyable experience for learners.

Originality/value

Gamification as a current concept of a twenty-first-century instructional skill has proven to be remarkably influential. This study suggests that the FC and gamification concept might be possibly implemented in a low-tech information environment – without the required advanced technology platform.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Zamzami Zainuddin, Corinne Jacqueline Perera, Hussein Haruna and Habiburrahim Habiburrahim

The purpose of this study is twofold. Firstly, this research aims at helping countries implement an equitable, innovative and context-appropriate stay-home game plan for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold. Firstly, this research aims at helping countries implement an equitable, innovative and context-appropriate stay-home game plan for the millions of disadvantaged and under-privileged students severely affected by the forfeiture of school closures; and secondly, this study proclaims that the burgeoning popularity of gamification has the potential to lay the bedrock foundation for ‘Literacy in the New Norm’.

Design/methodology/approach

The temporal closure of schools around the world to limit the spread of the COVID-19 has resulted in massive educational disruptions triggering adverse effects and bringing much of education under grave threat. Through a review of the current empirical and conceptual literature, this study proposes a new gamification concept in a non-technology environment.

Findings

Well underway are global dialogues that hold conversations on implementing mitigation strategies to counter the looming global health crisis. This has generated the impetus for a more concerted effort by concerned governments and international organizations to identify appropriate solutions for the continuity of learning so that the learning never stops. While educators and learners plunge further into the core of reconstructing education, the authors recognize that the fundamentals of technology and virtual connectivity have all along contributed to the multi-faceted e-learning stage set. However, concerns regarding the paradigm shift to remote online learning would certainly exacerbate inequalities cardinally felt across disadvantaged communities around the globe.

Originality/value

As the world is currently bound by strict isolation measures, learners of all ages have been relegated to the confines of their homes. For the most part, the stark realities of technological mishaps that have befallen underprivileged school children, serve as a reminder to help target children all over the world who are in most peril of losing ground in terms of continued education. It is on these grounds that the criterion set out in this article elucidates the nature and scope of a supplementary stay-home game plan detailing the use of game affordances that bear intelligently in the creation of home-based activities for parents to give it their best effort in fostering a collaborative and meaningful parent-child relationship that spawns the new language of literacy in the new norm.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 121 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2019

Johanna Kiili and Johanna Moilanen

The purpose of this paper is to explore how children have been involved in research activities in recent international child protection research and what kinds of ethical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how children have been involved in research activities in recent international child protection research and what kinds of ethical and methodological decisions are made by researchers regarding children’s participation.

Design/methodology/approach

In the paper, the complexity of children’s participation in research activities is analysed through an integrative literature review.

Findings

Children’s right to self-determination and the right to make informed decisions were the most challenging ethical principles to implement in practice. The study shows that researchers usually decide on the research design, and child welfare professionals and parents assess the eligibility of the children as research subjects.

Originality/value

More ethical reflection and critical discussion on the rights that adults, both parents and professionals, have in deciding the involvement of children in research activities is required.

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