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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Dominic M. Beggan

The purpose of this paper is to examine how an academic institution may more effectively respond to a disaster. In this particular situation the issues are being…

1836

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how an academic institution may more effectively respond to a disaster. In this particular situation the issues are being investigated in the context of a hurricane event. From 2005 to 2008 two hurricanes directly hit Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas. This paper examines the impact Hurricane Ike, the latter of these hurricanes, had on this academic institution. This research shares valuable insight into the vulnerabilities confronting academic institutions during natural disasters and highlights the lessons learned.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a practitioner paper which applies survey data and qualitative interviews of key decision makers.

Findings

Success in the aftermath of this disaster required serious consideration and forethought in institutional preparedness and continuity planning. Specifically, success relied on adequately prioritizing the recovery effort, effectively addressing communication and financial concerns, fostering administrative empowerment in the decision process, and devoting sufficient consideration to the development of alternative academic calendars.

Practical implications

The paper identifies issues of practical significance which academic institutions should consider when developing emergency plans related to natural disasters.

Originality/value

This paper contains new information about the impact of a natural disaster on an academic institution. The issues addressed are of value to comparable institutions in the process of developing their response and recovery plans.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 November 2008

59

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Cassandra R. Davis, Sarah R. Cannon and Sarah C. Fuller

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe the long-term impacts of hurricanes on schools and discuss approaches to improving recovery efforts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe the long-term impacts of hurricanes on schools and discuss approaches to improving recovery efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with 20 school districts in Texas and North Carolina after Hurricanes Harvey (2017) and Matthew (2016). In total, 115 interviews were conducted with teachers, principals, district superintendents and representatives from state education agencies. Interview questions focused on the impact of storms and strategies for recovery.

Findings

The authors uncovered three long-term impacts of hurricanes on schools: (1) constrained instructional time, (2) increased social-emotional needs and (3) the need to support educators.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on two storms, in two states, in two successive years. Data collection occurred in Texas, one academic year after the storm. As compared to the North Carolina, data collection occurred almost two academic years after the storm.

Practical implications

This paper illuminates strategies for stakeholders to implement and expedite hurricane recovery through; (1) updating curricula plans, (2) providing long-term counselors and (3) supporting educators in and out of school.

Originality/value

To date, very few studies have explored the ways in which schools face long-term impacts following a disaster. This paper provides insight to the challenges that prolong the impacts of disasters and impede recovery in schools. With hurricanes and related disasters continuing to affect schooling communities, more research is needed to identify the best ways to support schools, months to years after an event.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2022

Michelle McLeod

The purpose of this chapter is to report on the effects of a natural disaster on the tourism sector of Grand Bahama Island (GBI). This chapter explores the process of…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to report on the effects of a natural disaster on the tourism sector of Grand Bahama Island (GBI). This chapter explores the process of tourism destination recovery. Tourism destination recovery has become an important area of study in Small Island Developing States (SIDs). SIDs have been subject to increasing external shocks based on the state of the natural environment including climate change. GBI is the northernmost populated island in The Bahamas and the island has been impacted by several hurricanes within recent times including Hurricane Matthew in 2016 and Hurricane Dorian in 2019. A review of the tourism literature revealed that tourism destination recovery is an underresearched area in the Caribbean. Data were collected from stakeholder interviews to determine the process of tourism destination recovery. Findings revealed the importance to focus on product development, marketing, and coordination aspects of a tourism destination in recovery. This chapter offers a path towards tourism destination recovery by highlighting some of the challenges of the process, with consideration of a recovery framework for tourism destinations.

Details

Pandemics, Disasters, Sustainability, Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-105-4

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2022

Abstract

Details

Justice, Equity, and Emergency Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-332-9

Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

Cindy Pierard, Jason Shoup, Susanne K. Clement, Mark Emmons, Teresa Y. Neely and Frances C. Wilkinson

This chapter introduces Building Back Better Libraries (BBBL) as a critical concept for improved library planning both prior to and following a disaster or other…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter introduces Building Back Better Libraries (BBBL) as a critical concept for improved library planning both prior to and following a disaster or other emergency. Building Back Better, an idea widely discussed in the disaster recovery literature, seeks to use the difficulty of a disaster as an opportunity to go beyond the status quo and to promote changes that result in stronger, more resilient communities. The authors will define BBB elements and frameworks, building upon those to create a model for library disaster planning and recovery, and applying it to cases involving space and facilities, collections, services, and people.

Methodology/approach

Literature on the Building Back Better concept and frameworks, as well as library emergency response, was reviewed. This source material was used to develop a modified framework for improved library disaster planning and recovery. The Building Back Better Libraries framework is discussed and applied to cases involving library facilities and spaces, collections, and services, and its implementation through a disaster planning team is reviewed.

Findings

Though all libraries hope to avoid disaster, few succeed. One survey found that as many as 75% of academic library respondents had experienced a disaster or emergency. Evidence also suggests that few libraries are prepared, with as many as 66–80% of libraries reporting that they have no emergency plan with staff trained to carry it out. Even when plans are in place, the rush to respond to immediate needs following a disaster can overwhelm the ability to pursue effective long-term planning. Building Back Better, when framed for libraries, provides a planning tool to balance short-term response with long-term recovery and resilience. The Building Back Better Libraries framework focuses on the areas of risk assessment for library collections and spaces; recovery and rejuvenation for facilities, collections, and services; and implementation and monitoring, with particular discussion of the human element and the role of a library disaster planning team.

Practical implications

The proposed framework, Building Back Better Libraries (BBBL), can be used to strengthen disaster planning in a manner that balances meeting immediate needs with implementing longer term plans to create stronger and more resilient libraries.

Originality/value

Although aspects of BBB ideas are present in existing library literature, the concept is not formally defined for the library context.

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Jennifer Horney, Matt C. Simon, Kristen Ricchetti-Masterson and Philip Berke

This paper aims to determine household perceptions of disaster recovery plan development and implementation, and to identify groups that may be less aware of the recovery

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine household perceptions of disaster recovery plan development and implementation, and to identify groups that may be less aware of the recovery planning process to provide recommendations to officials for improving participation in planning and resident support of implementation priorities.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 194 residents of a US Atlantic coast county impacted by Hurricane Irene. Respondents were selected via a two-stage cluster sampling method automated through the use of a Geographic Information Systems toolkit.

Findings

Although few households reported participation in the county’s recovery planning process, a majority felt that the plan would be better if it incorporated input from a wide range of stakeholders. The number one reason residents did not participate was the lack of knowledge that they could. Some vulnerable populations were less aware of the recovery plan, including the elderly and those living in poverty, while others were more aware, including those with children and those without access to a working vehicle. Respondents prioritized recovery activities around infrastructure and public safety, yet ranked activities related to public information and housing as less important.

Practical implications

This paper highlights potential successes of emergency management outreach and identifies groups that are not being reached during recovery planning. The paper provides insight on resident priorities for recovery after disaster.

Originality/value

There has been little research on the implementation of recovery plans and few studies that have examined the behaviors and opinions of households with regard to recovery plan development and implementation.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Elisa F. Topper

The purpose of this paper is to examine one academic library and how the staff dealt with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine one academic library and how the staff dealt with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of the Tulane Recovery Center in New Orleans that was created after Hurricane Katrina in cooperation with Library Associates Companies (LAC).

Findings

Institutions may have a disaster plan outlined as to what to do in an emergency but in actuality one is never fully prepared for a natural disaster.

Originality/value

This paper examines the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina on the Howard‐Tilton Memorial Library at Tulane University and the creation of the Tulane Recovery Center, which can serve as a model for other to follow.

Details

New Library World, vol. 112 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Jamie Ellis

The purpose of this paper is to explain the procedures taken by public library staff in response to extensive damage to a research collection due to a large natural disaster.

1655

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the procedures taken by public library staff in response to extensive damage to a research collection due to a large natural disaster.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the methodology used by one research collection in response to a large‐scale disaster, recommendations are presented in the paper for future disaster planning and creating an individualized disaster response.

Findings

The study finds that each institution develops different procedures in the wake of disasters, and creating a unique disaster plan and response is key to the successful recovery of collections.

Research limitations/implications

The methods used in response to Hurricane Katrina may not necessarily correspond to other types of disasters or all institutions; however, planning for all types of disasters is encouraged. A selected bibliography is included that provides current resources on the subject.

Practical implications

Methods utilized in the Biloxi Public Library's response to Hurricane Katrina and lessons learned may be applicable to other institutions and the future of disaster response and collection recovery.

Originality/value

While recounting the impact of Hurricane Katrina on one collection, there are recommendations for the future of disaster planning at the institutional level.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Stefanie Haeffele-Balch and Virgil Henry Storr

Austrian insights on the limits of central planning, the pervasiveness of knowledge problems, and the importance of the entrepreneur in coordinating social change have…

Abstract

Austrian insights on the limits of central planning, the pervasiveness of knowledge problems, and the importance of the entrepreneur in coordinating social change have yielded substantive contributions to the literature on how individuals and communities respond to both natural and unnatural, or manmade, disasters. Austrian economists have examined the political economy of natural disasters, disaster relief and recovery efforts, the economic effects of extended wars, post-conflict societal reconstitution, and the effectiveness of humanitarian aid. This literature advances two main findings: (1) that centralized governments are likely to be ineffective at providing the goods and services that are necessary for community recovery and (2) that decentralized efforts are better suited to address the needs of society, to discover the best course of action for producing and distributing these goods and services, and to adapt to changing needs, circumstances, and technology. This paper examines the Austrian theories utilized to examine disasters, provides a summary of the recent research on both natural and unnatural disasters, and proposes areas for future research.

Details

New Thinking in Austrian Political Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-137-8

Keywords

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