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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Orsolya Csilla Bencze, Sudipta Dasmohapatra and David C. Tilotta

Citizens who live in disaster prone areas need to protect their properties – particularly their homes – against the destructive effects of natural disasters to avoid…

Abstract

Purpose

Citizens who live in disaster prone areas need to protect their properties – particularly their homes – against the destructive effects of natural disasters to avoid large‐scale economic losses. The purpose of this paper is to present the basic concepts and methodology for an improved system for rating the resilience of homes against natural disaster perils. This system is referred to as the Resilient Scoring Utility (ReScU) framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A two‐pronged approach was undertaken in developing the ReScU framework. Existing building programs for homes were studied as potential models for a system to rate the natural disaster resilience of homes. Simultaneously, a diverse 25‐member stakeholder panel (focus) group was queried periodically, using a Delphi technique, in order to better understand and gain a consensus about the issues surrounding homes, incentives and natural disasters.

Findings

Using the results from the above approach, the ReScU framework was designed with four key operational features: an output that can be tied to incentives; the use of performance‐based evaluation criteria; utilization of “threshold” adjustments to represent the variability due to the location of homes; and adaptability to new technologies, perils, and non‐perils.

Originality/value

There are few existing programs that offer assistance to homeowners by providing them with guidance on how to protect/reinforce their homes against natural disasters. Unlike these other programs, the ReScU framework proposed in this paper is location specific, performance‐driven, and may be tied readily to incentives. These features will assist homeowners, homebuilders, and others in designing, building, and maintaining more natural disaster resilient homes. It should, however be noted that the proposed ReScU framework is a concept, and future work will include testing the assumptions for their reliability and validity when rating homes.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Robert T. Burrus, Christopher F. Dumas and J. Edward Graham

The purpose of this paper is to contrast the behavior of a US homeowner exposed to hurricane risk with government policies designed to limit hurricane losses. Owners limit…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contrast the behavior of a US homeowner exposed to hurricane risk with government policies designed to limit hurricane losses. Owners limit these losses by selecting structural improvements or mitigation and wind and flood insurance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses mitigation costs, hurricane probabilities, and insurance premiums to frame rational cost‐minimizing choices for the homeowner.

Findings

First, even though nationwide hurricane damage costs are large, the cost‐minimizing response for an individual property owner may be to buy no mitigation or structural improvements, no flood insurance and minimal wind insurance, as probabilities of strong hurricanes striking particular locations are extremely low. Second, additional insurance is a less costly defense than structural improvement, even under much higher insurance premiums and hurricane strike probabilities. Third, federally subsidized flood insurance may reduce the effectiveness of government programs encouraging structural mitigation.

Originality/value

The last few years were underscored by the catastrophic damages of Hurricanes‐Katrina, Ike and Wilma. Enormous costs suffered by the public and private sectors could have been avoided with greater mitigation by homeowners. This paper examines the financial incentives for such mitigation. Those incentives are examined in a previously untested framework.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Dominic M. Beggan

The purpose of this paper is to examine how an academic institution may more effectively respond to a disaster. In this particular situation the issues are being…

1836

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how an academic institution may more effectively respond to a disaster. In this particular situation the issues are being investigated in the context of a hurricane event. From 2005 to 2008 two hurricanes directly hit Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas. This paper examines the impact Hurricane Ike, the latter of these hurricanes, had on this academic institution. This research shares valuable insight into the vulnerabilities confronting academic institutions during natural disasters and highlights the lessons learned.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a practitioner paper which applies survey data and qualitative interviews of key decision makers.

Findings

Success in the aftermath of this disaster required serious consideration and forethought in institutional preparedness and continuity planning. Specifically, success relied on adequately prioritizing the recovery effort, effectively addressing communication and financial concerns, fostering administrative empowerment in the decision process, and devoting sufficient consideration to the development of alternative academic calendars.

Practical implications

The paper identifies issues of practical significance which academic institutions should consider when developing emergency plans related to natural disasters.

Originality/value

This paper contains new information about the impact of a natural disaster on an academic institution. The issues addressed are of value to comparable institutions in the process of developing their response and recovery plans.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Transformational University Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-118-9

Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2022

Alessandra Jerolleman, Shirley Laska and Julie Torres

Changing climate dynamics have resulted in a confluence of disaster events to which Louisiana government leaders and emergency managers have never before had to respond…

Abstract

Changing climate dynamics have resulted in a confluence of disaster events to which Louisiana government leaders and emergency managers have never before had to respond simultaneously: a global pandemic and an “epidemic” of landfalling hurricanes during the 2020 season (eight cones over Louisiana) with challenging, unusual characteristics: (1) two hurricanes passing over the same location within 36 hours, a fujiwharaHurricanes Marco and Laura, (2) 150 mile-per-hour winds inadequately forecasted and of an almost unprecedented speed, (3) a difficult to forecast surge magnitude that led to incorrect immediate response, (4) delayed long-term recovery efforts from responders outside of the area because of initial reporting errors regarding surge heights and wind speed, and (5) a storm, Zeta, that passed directly over a densely populated area that would have been hard hit by rain if the storm had slowed. In addition, the number and closeness in dates of storm occurrences led to lengthy coastal high-water levels. To these co-occurring threats forecasters, state and local officials and residents responded with expertise and commitment, adhering to close collaboration, modifying evacuations and undertaking protective measures, all contributing to a low death rate from storms and a modest death rate from COVID. More just outcomes were supported by the general capacity of the responders, commitment to keep the residents informed about both risks and appropriate responses to them and the provision of special services, calculated for the new situation of the pandemic and the storm epidemic, for those without the means to respond adequately to both.

Details

Justice, Equity, and Emergency Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-332-9

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Modern Energy Market Manipulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-386-1

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Hilary L. Coulson, Yali Zou and Frank Fernandez

Abstract

Details

Transformational University Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-118-9

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Michalis Diakakis, Georgios Deligiannakis, Katerina Katsetsiadou and Efthymios Lekkas

Tropical storms pose a significant threat to population despite the noteworthy improvements in forecasting and emergency management. Following the effects of Hurricane

1341

Abstract

Purpose

Tropical storms pose a significant threat to population despite the noteworthy improvements in forecasting and emergency management. Following the effects of Hurricane Sandy in the continental North America (USA and Canada) and the Caribbean, the purpose of this paper is to examine the mortality caused by the hurricane, focussing on differences in human vulnerability between these two regions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed a database of 233 deaths, consisting of variables that provided a description of the circumstances under which the fatal incidents occurred and demographic details of the victims.

Findings

Analysis of the database showed higher percentages of female and young victims in the Caribbean than in continental North America, where mortality increased progressively with age and the ratio of males to females was higher. The majority of deaths occurred outdoors especially during clean-up and in vehicle crashes related to the storm. Physical trauma and drowning were identified as the most common causes of death, followed by carbon monoxide poisoning, hypothermia and others, although substantially different percentages were recorded between the two regions. Overall, indirect deaths presented a higher percentage than direct ones. Among the latter, incidents caused by storm surge and tree falls showed the highest numbers. Power failure and car crashes were the most common cause of indirect incidents.

Originality/value

The paper provides a thorough analysis of the circumstances under which fatal incidents occurred. It identifies parameters that affected the vulnerability of human life to the storm and discusses the differences between the Caribbean and continental North America.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

David V. Rosowsky

This paper aims to address a critical aspect of post‐event recovery, namely the rebuilding of the housing stock following a devastating natural disaster. Using hurricanes

461

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address a critical aspect of post‐event recovery, namely the rebuilding of the housing stock following a devastating natural disaster. Using hurricanes as an example, challenges and opportunities are systematically discussed in hopes of sparking some further discussion and new economic models (including incentive‐based) that can help move communities toward greater resiliency and sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

As a viewpoint paper, this paper relies on the author's experience in post‐hurricane damage investigation, structural retrofit, and design to minimize loss.

Findings

In evaluating how best to rebuild following a natural disaster, there are clear opportunities (and needs) in the areas of structural damage/loss mitigation, codes and standards, building material and system selection, and risk communication. Specific suggestions are made in each of these areas and the importance of risk‐based decision is stressed in each area.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the ongoing and informed discussions on resiliency, sustainable design, and disaster‐resistant communities.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Frédéric Allamel

The Houma Indians reside in the backwaters of the Mississippi Delta, a coastal area that is disappearing due to natural subsidence, sea-level rise, and mismanagements of…

Abstract

Purpose

The Houma Indians reside in the backwaters of the Mississippi Delta, a coastal area that is disappearing due to natural subsidence, sea-level rise, and mismanagements of the ecosystems. The purpose of this paper is to scrutinize the causes of this ecocide and the responses addressing such environmental challenges, including scientific strategies, political non-intervention, and the United Houma Nation’s plans for preserving a sense of place and togetherness as a prerequisite for its cultural survival.

Design/methodology/approach

This ethnographic investigation relies on participant observation, and interviews with tribal leaders, fishermen, trappers, as well as scientists and local politicians. In order to grasp the emic perspective, most interviews were conducted in the Houma French dialect.

Findings

The Mississippi Delta epitomizes issues that will shape tomorrow’s world, namely, the vulnerability of coastal areas and the flows of environmental refugees. As shown by this study, coastal residents do not make a passive flux of evacuees responding to state/NGO-run plans. Actually, they are chief agents who either develop resilient strategies or proactive relocation stratagems to avoid ethnocide. Their pragmatic methodologies provide valuable data for any crisis management efforts.

Originality/value

This research gives a voice to the voiceless, and conveys their existential struggles from within – unlike most studies of endangered communities relying on outsiders’ viewpoints. This perspective depicts the Houmas as actors of their survival who implement diverse tribal strategies for coping with environmental change.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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